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Department of Anthropology

Anthropology Events

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Anthropology Speakers' Series

Location:
Evans Liberal Arts Building (ELA); Room 225
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Nicole Taylor
Campus Sponsor:
Department of Anthropology

Anthropology Department Speakers' Series

Presents

Annalisa Cappella

Post-doc researcher, LABANOF (Laboratorio di Antropologia e Odontologia Forense), Department of Biomedical Science for Health, University of Milan (Italy)

Common Forensic Protocols and Strategies for the Identification of Dead Migrants

Hundreds of thousands of victims from Africa and the Middle East are fleeing war and violation of human rights via the Mediterranean Sea. Recently, the increase of this migratory flow has caused a humanitarian tragedy with global implications, resulting often in an “epidemic” of deaths. Many of the bodies recovered are unidentified, and so far no proper actions have been taken in Europe on a large scale for dealing with this issue, except for an initial, isolated attempt in Italy. In the past few years, the Italian Government’s Office of the Commissioner for Missing Persons together with the University of Milan, specifically with LABANOF (Laboratorio di Antropologia e Odontologia Forense), started a pilot project focused on the identification of a large number of victims who died in three recent, major shipwrecks which occurred in the Mediterranean Sea.

The activities performed in this Italian experience represented an important precedent and effort in Europe, demonstrating it to be a significant step towards a potential standard for the management of future similar emergencies. It also highlighted the complexity of the problem from a logistic, administrative, technical and legal point of view. The OpID project carried out by FACTS at Texas State University represents a US model with which to compare the Italian project: sharing such experiences may be useful for developing solutions that should be adopted also in other European Countries with the intent to achieve higher percentages of success in the personal identification of dead migrants.

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more about event

Anthropology Speakers' Series

Location:
Evans Liberal Arts Building (ELA); 114
Cost:
free
Contact:
Nicole Taylor
Campus Sponsor:
Anthropology Department

Anthropology Department Speakers' Series

Presents

Andrew Richardson
Outreach and Archives Manager, Canterbury Archaeological Trust

On the Edge of Rome: a late Iron Age and Roman Centre of Power on Britain's Channel Coast

This lecture will outline discoveries made since the 1920's at East Wear Bay, Folkestone, England. The site, which is situated on the cliff top overlooking the English Channel, with the coast of France easily visible on clear days, has produced evidence of a remarkable prehistoric and Roman settlement. Whilst human activity at the site may date back as far as the Upper Palaeolithic, over 10,000 years ago, the height of activity seems to have been around 2,000 years ago, in the decades between Julius Caesar's conquest of Gaul (modern France and Belgium) and the Roman invasion of Britain under the Emperor Claudius in AD 43. During this time, East Wear Bay appears to have become one of the key points of contact between late Iron Age Britain and the Roman world. Today, an annual training excavation, the East Wear Bay Archaeological Field School, takes place every summer, with students from Texas State attending in 2015-16. This internationally important site is threatened by coastal erosion, and the talk will outline work to date and future plans to excavate the threatened areas before they are lost to the sea.

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Departmental News

Texas State University was well-represented at the 2017 AAFS conference!

Several current and former Texas State Anthropology graduate students presented work at the 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences conference in New Orleans, Louisiana.  Visit our news page for pictures and more information.

Dr. Carolyn Boyd wins the Society for American Archaeology Book Award

Carolyn Boyd has been selected by the Society for American Archaeology as the 2017 recipient of their book award for her new book, The White Shaman Mural: An Enduring Creation Narrative in Rock Art of the Lower Pecos.  You can find more information her work as well as a video highlighting her work in the Lower Pecos on our news page.

Graduate student, Jessica Galea, wins American Association of Physical Anthropology (AAPA) Pollitzer Essay award.

Jessica's essay calls for a renaming of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.  It was ranked in the top 10 essays, so she has been invited to participate in the AAPA Presidential panel on, “What’s in a Name.” Jessica’s essay can be found here.

Dr. Wescott will give a presentation about the Forensic Anthropology Center at Texas State to the National Sojourners meeting on February 22.

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