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The Art of Gentrification | A Book Talk by Cary Cordova
Monday, November 27, 2017 | 2:00 pm | TMH 201

The Heart of the MissionSan Francisco has been home to political and cultural movements that have reshaped America. Cary Cordova’s The Heart of the Mission: Latino Art and Politics in San Francisco explores how Latina/o artists, residents and migrants both, produced art that spoke to their vision of themselves, their city, their transnational social movements, to the wealth-driven gentrification, and their American cultures.

Learn more about her work.


Emiliano Zapata in American Memory | A Talk and Book Signing by Paul Hart
Thursday, October 12, 2017 | 12:30 pm | Brazos Hall

Zapata Book CoverThe talk explores the afterlife of Emiliano Zapata in North America, tracking the ways his life, his actions, and his myths inspired many movements and cultures across North America, from 1950s rural guerrillas to urban Chicana/os and from Agraristas to the current Zapatistas.

Paul Hart is a Professor of History and Associate Director for the Center for International Studies at Texas State University. He is also the author of Bitter Harvest: The Social Transformation of Morelos, Mexico and the Origins of the Zapatista Revolution, 1840-1910 (2005).


Blue Texas: Back to the Future | A Reflection by Max Krochmal
Wednesday, October 25, 2017 | 12:30-2:30 pm | Flowers Hall 230

Blue TexasBlue Texas is about the other Texas, a mid-twentieth-century hotbed of community organizing, liberal politics, and civil rights activism. At the ballot box and in the streets, Mexican Americans, African Americans and labor activists demanded not only integration but economic justice, labor rights, and real political power for all. And it worked, permanently changing the racial political order in Texas.

In this talk, Max Krochmal goes back to the politics of community organizing in Jim Crow Texas to consider all of our futures in Texas after Trump and after Hurricane Harvey.

 


Fairy Tales for Truth and Justice | Exhibit
On View - September 13 - December 13, 2017 | Opening Reception and Reading - September 13 | 12:00pm | Brazos Hall

Fairy Tales for Truth and JusticeDeveloped through a one-year onsite artist-in-residence program at Grand Central Art Center in Santa Ana, California, SanTana’s Fairy Tales is a visual art installation, oral history, storytelling project initiated by artist/author Sarah Rafael García. The project integrates community-based narratives to create contemporary fairytales and fables that represent the history and stories of Mexican/Mexican-American residents of Santa Ana (inspired by the Grimm’s’ fairy tales).


Steve Schafer: The Border, book reading and panel
Thursday, September 28, 2017 | Reading 5:30pm; Panel Discussion 6pm | The Wittliff Collections

Steve Schafer, The BorderSteve Schafer visits Texas State University to read from his new book, The Border, a novel about four Mexican teenagers who flee to the U.S. through the scorching Sonoran Desert after getting caught in the cross fire of the narco-violence along the U.S./Mexico border.  After the reading, a panel discussion entitled “Immigration and the Refugee Experience” will focus on the experiences and criminalization of immigrants with insights from Dr. Jose Coll (Director, School of Social Work at Texas State), Dr. Luis Torres (College of Social Work, University of Houston), Chief Benjamine “Carry” Huffman (Chief of Strategic Planning and Analysis Directorate at U.S. Border Patrol Headquarters), and Dr. John Mckiernen-Gonzalez (Director, Center for the Study of the Southwest).


All the Agents and Saints: Dispatches from the U.S. Borderlands
A reading by Stephanie Elizondo Griest
Thursday, September 7, 2017 | 11:00am – 12:20pm | The Wittliff Collections

Agents and SaintsAfter a decade of chasing stories around the globe, intrepid travel writer Stephanie Elizondo Griest followed the magnetic pull home—only to discover that her native South Texas had been radically transformed in her absence. Ravaged by drug wars and barricaded by an eighteen-foot steel wall, her ancestral land had become the nation’s foremost crossing ground for undocumented workers, many of whom perished along the way.  In All the Agents and Saints, Elizondo Griest weaves seven years of stories into a meditation on the existential impact of international borderlines by illuminating the spaces in between and the people who live there.


William Jensen: Cities of Men
April 27, 2017 | 5:30 pm Reception | 6:00 pm Reading | Brazos Hall

William Jensen Cities of MenJoin the Center for the Study of the Southwest in celebrating the release of their own William Jensen's first novel, Cities of Men.  A book signing with advanced copies of Cities of Men will follow the reading. 

In 1987, twelve-year-old Cooper Balsam's mother, Arden, disappears without a trace. As days pass, Cooper and his father search for the most important woman in their lives. From the hills of Southern California, to the deserts of Arizona, and down to the beaches of Mexico, the father and son will look for someone who may not want to be found for reasons they don't yet understand.


Tim Z. Hernandez: And They Will Call You
April 6, 2017 | 12:30 pm. in Brazos Hall | 5:30 pm at the Wittliff Collections

And They Will Call YouTim Z. Hernandez shares the harrowing account of “the worst airplane disaster in California’s history,” which claimed the lives of thirty-two passengers, including twenty-eight Mexican citizens—farmworkers who were being deported by the U.S. government. Outraged that media reports omitted only the names of the Mexican passengers, American folk icon Woody Guthrie penned a poem that went on to become one of the most important protest songs of the twentieth century, “Plane Wreck at Los Gatos (Deportee).” Combining years of painstaking investigative research and masterful storytelling, Hernandez’ weaves a captivating narrative from testimony, historical records, and eyewitness accounts, reconstructing the incident and the lives behind the legendary song.


Landscapes, Peoples, and Institutions: Constructing the Borderlands
An International Symposium Sponsored by the Center for the Study of the Southwest

Saturday, April 1, 2017 | 9:30 am – 5 pm | Flowers Hall 230

Constructing the BorderlandsDevelopments along US-Mexico Borderlands in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries had long-lasting effects and contributed decisively to give the region its current configuration. This symposium offers a fresh look at some of the ways in which peoples of diverse ethnic backgrounds and geographical origins adapted to the borderlands environment and to one another during that period.

English Program Español

A Fresh Look at the Fort Parker Raid of 1836
Wednesday, March 29 | 3:30 p.m. | Brazos Hall

Dr. Daniel GeloTexas was an independent Republic for just a few years, between 1836 and 1846. This relatively short time span was, however, particularly prolific in producing frontier myths, heroes, and antiheroes, some of which have resisted the test of time surprisingly well. The Comanche Indians of the southern plains are doubtlessly one of the most enduring icons of that mythical legacy. On May 19, 1836, an Indian raid on Fort Parker, in today’s Limestone County, Texas, resulted in the killing and capture of several Anglo settlers, including Cynthia Ann Parker –future mother of the famous Comanche leader Quanah. This fabled incident has become one of the foundational myths of the Texas Republic. Dr. Gelo’s careful scrutiny of eyewitness accounts, and his understanding of indigenous geopolitical strategies at the time will reveal what actually happened at Fort Paker, the exact identity of the attackers, and what their motivations were, redressing both the standard account of the raid and some recent interpretations.


An Anthology of Poetry, Short Fiction, and Nonfiction Reading
Brazos Hall | March 2, 2017 | 12:30 pm

Texas Weather PosterPublished by Lamar University Press, Texas Weather: An Anthology of Poetry, Short Fiction, and Nonfiction is a collection of works that “celebrates with intimate detail and incredible scope why Texans are so fascinated with, wary of, confounded by, and thankful for their weather.” Edited by Laurence Musgrove and Terry Dalrymple, this anthology includes an amazing array of 59 writers. Of these writers and editors, Jason Harris, Vanessa Johnson, Laurence Musgrove, Charles Taylor, and Steve Wilson will share their work. William Jensen will moderate the discussion panel to follow.

Book signing to follow.


A Land without Borders: The Comanche Range
An exhibit about Comanche geography and adaptation to the land

On view February 7 – May 10, 2017

Comanche Exhibit

Exhibit Opening Reception: Tuesday, February 7

Center for the Study of the Southwest

Brazos Hall, 5:00-6:00 p.m.

Texas State University, San Marcos, TX


Book Talk by Andrés Reséndez on The Other Slavery: Indian Enslavement in North America
Thursday, February 16, 2017 | Flowers Hall 230 | 12:30 p.m.

Other SlaveryProf. Andrés Reséndez’s presentation argues that native enslavement and slave raids are central to the settlement and economic growth of North America. His book, The Other Slavery, is the first broad history of the long co-existence of Indian enslavement, depopulation, chattel slavery and abolition in the West from the 1500s to the 1900s.


Editorial Fellowship, Center for the Study of the Southwest

The Center for the Study of the Southwest (CSSW), announces the availability of a Research Assistant position to serve as Editorial Fellow at the Center during the 2017-2018 academic year (renewable based on evaluation of first year’s work). The Editorial Fellow will assist the CSSW staff in production of Texas Books in Review (TBR), Southwestern American Literature (SAL), and Sound Historian. Related duties include text and graphics layout and copyediting on all journals, and book review support and mail-out supervision on TBR and SAL, with other duties as assigned. The fellow is also expected to carry out one personal research project on a self-chosen topic related to the region.

The Fellowship consists of an RA position (nine-month appointment at $9,855) plus a tuition scholarship of $1,500 per semester and some support for research and conference travel.

Click here for more information.


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