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Spring 2019, Fall 2018, and Summer 2018 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses

Departmental Courses

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  • Professor: Dr. Neill Hadder

    Day/Time: MW 11:00-12:20

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 39422

     

  • Professor: Dr. Suni Dharmasiri

    Day/Time: MW 2:00-3:20

    Location: IGRM 3203

    CRN: 37914

    Description: This course provides the students with a strong foundation in cellular and molecular biology. Topics include biochemistry, energy metabolism, molecular bases of gene regulation and protein functions, cell division and control, and cell signaling. This course is required for all biology majors and is not recommended for non-science majors.

  • Professor: Dr. David Johnson

    Day/Time: MW 11:00 - 12:20

    Location: SUPP 326

    CRN: 37929

    Description: This course provides science majors with a foundation in organismal biology, Mendelian and population genetics, evolution and ecology. Topics include: patterns of inheritance, genetics, evolution, speciation, phylogenetics, and behavioral population, community, and ecosystem ecology. This course is required for all biology majors and is not recommended for non-science majors.

  • Professor: Dr. Sean Kerwin

    Day/Time: TR 2:00 - 3:20

    Location: CHEM 233

    CRN: 35219

  • Professor: Prof. Christopher Dorsey

    Day/Time: T  3:30-6:20pm

    Location: CHEM 232

    CRN: 31472

  • Professor: Dr. Jennifer Forrest

    Day/Time: MW 9:30-10:50

    Location: CENT G02

    CRN: 39214

  • Professor: Prof. Christina Moore

    Lecture:
    Day/Time: TR 11:00-12:20
    Location: MCOY 333
    CRN: 37235

    Lab:
    Day/Time: T 10:00-10:50
    Location: MCOY 333
    CRN: 37237

  • Professor: Dr. Linda Alkire

    Day/Time: TR 12:30-1:50

    Location: MCOY 335

    CRN: 36344

  • Professor: Dr. Eugene Curtin

    Lecture:
    Day/Time: MWF 9:00A - 9:50A
    Location: LAMP 502B
    CRN: 35428

    Lab:
    Day/Time: TR 8:00A - 9:20A
    Location: LAMP 502B
    CRN: 35429

    Description: This is the first course in differential and integral calculus which stresses limits as well as the applications of calculus to the problems of science.

  • Professor: Dr. Vaughn Baltzly

    Day/Time: TR 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 38616

    Description: A study of universal philosophical problems and their solutions with a view toward developing clear thinking about knowledge, belief, and value. Approximately one half of this course will focus on the student’s critical thinking skills. Credit cannot be given for both PHIL 1305 and PHIL 3301.

  • Professor: Dr. Anthony Cross

    Day/Time: MW 2:00-3:20

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 35821

    Description: A study of universal philosophical problems and their solutions with a view toward developing clear thinking about knowledge, belief, and value. Approximately one half of this course will focus on the student’s critical thinking skills. Credit cannot be given for both PHIL 1305 and PHIL 3301.

  • Professor: Dr. Anthony Cross

    Day/Time: MW 12:30-1:50

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 35828

    Description: A study of universal philosophical problems and their solutions with a view toward developing clear thinking about knowledge, belief, and value. Approximately one half of this course will focus on the student’s critical thinking skills. Credit cannot be given for both PHIL 1305 and PHIL 3301.

  • Professor: Prof. Jordan Morille

    Day/Time: TR 3:30-4:50

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 37793

    Description: An introductory course designed to give the student a fundamental understanding of the creation and appreciation of diverse modes of expression through the visual and performing arts. This course may not be repeated for credit by taking ART 2313, DAN 2313, or MU 2313.

Core Curriculum Courses

  • Professor: Dr. Daniela Ferrero

    Day/Time: MW 5:00 - 6:20

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 39168

    Description: This course will present the most important topics of graph theory through its applications and in a lively style, including some examples of proofs designed to strengthen mathematical techniques, offer challenging opportunities to have fun while doing mathematical research. The course is intended to be self-contained, so no prior knowledge of graph theory is required.

    Counts As: Mathematics Code 020 or may count as MATH 4336

  • Professor: Dr. Nico Schuler

    Day/Time: TR 12:30 - 1:50

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 39169

    Description: This course is a reading, writing, and listening intensive,
    interdisciplinary survey of African-American popular music in America and its relationship to American culture, society, politics, and the other arts.

    Counts As: Creative Arts Code 050

  • Professor: Dr. Ron Haas

    Day/Time: MW 2:00-3:20

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 39170

    Description: This course in the history of American social and protest movements from the end of Reconstruction through Occupy focuses in particular on the movements of the 1960s - the Civil Rights Movement, the New Left, the Women's and Homosexual Liberation Movements, and the Counterculture - and their enduring legacies in contemporary society.

    Counts As: American History Code 060

  • Professor: Dr. Vince Bangulo

    Day/Time: MW 11:00 - 12:20

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 39171

    Description: This course is a study of functions performed in the American system of government, understood through the framework of Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville's seminal study of American social and political life, the nature and distinctive character of modern democratic societies, and the problems and perils these societies confront.

    Counts As: Government/Political Science Component Code 070 

  • Professor: Dr. Michael Burns

    Day/Time: TF 2:00-3:20

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 39172

    Description: This course examines technology's impact on human communication. Students will examine their dependency on technology in order to re-humanize communication. Students will learn to express ideas through the development of interpersonal, small group, and presentational communication skills, developing command of oral, aural, written, and visual literacy in appropriate contexts.

    Counts As: Texas State Component Code 090 (Communications)

  • Professor: Dr. Sharon Ugalde

    Day/Time: TR 11:00-12:20

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 39173

    Description: A study of selected works of Nobel Prize author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, this course offers unique insights into Latin American culture, filtered through the literary and journalistic vision of Colombia's world renowned author. Additional readings and films emphasize the complex nature of the Latin American culture and literature.

    Counts as: Texas State Component Area Code 090 (Literature) or may be taken for SPAN 4350, 4330, or 3371, ENG 2340, 3341, or 3316, or HIST 3325H, or Advanced English Group C

  • Professor: Dr. Steven Beebe

    Day/Time: TR 12:30-1:50

    Location: CENT 206

    CRN: 39174

    Description: This course uses the writing and life of C.S. to examine communication theory and principles. Lewis's work as a speaker, teacher, broadcaster and educator provides a comprehensive body of work that students can evaluate as they master and apply rhetorical and communication theories.  

    Counts as:  Texas State Area Option Code 090 (Communications)

  • Professor: Drs. Catherine Jaffe & Louie Valencia

    Day/Time: TR 9:30-10:50

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 39175

    Description: This interdisciplinary course examines popular political ideologies of the 1930s, such as liberalism, fascism, socialism, anarchism, and communism, to understand the context of the Spanish Civil War. In addition to creating a digital humanities project, students will analyze exemplary, original texts from the period, and study literature, film, and other secondary sources that reflect back on the memory of the war from both the Franco Dictatorship and the current Spanish Democracy.

    Counts as: Texas State Area Option Code 090 (Literature); or may count as advanced English; or may substitute for HIST 4318O "The History of Modern Spain."

  • Professor: Prof. Christopher Marquiss

    Day/Time: MW 11:00-12:20

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 39176

    Description: This course examines plot in major contemporary American novels and stories (1985-present), both as a driving force in the work(s) and as a reflection of recent American history. Students will have an opportunity to explore living writers and an unfolding literary landscape in terms of plot, conventions, and source material -- an interdisciplinary study of the real and imagined events that shape who we are in this place and time.

    Counts as: Texas State Area Option Code 090 (Literature) or may count as ENG 3336 or 3340

  • Professor: Prof. Amanda North

    Day/Time: MW 3:30P - 4:50P

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 39177

    Description: Students will read and analyze representative authors and works from British Literature. The course examines works in historical, social, and cultural context as a record of human experience. Courses employ a variety of teaching methods.

    Counts as: Communication Code 090 and 094 (Literature)

Honors Courses

  • Professor: Dr. Peter Hutcheson

    Day/Time: MW 12:30-1:50

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 39178

    Description: Is it reasonable to believe that there is an all-knowing, all-powerful, and all-good God, despite the appearance of pointless evil? The course consists of attempts to answer this question with rational arguments.

    Counts As:  Advanced Philosophy or counts toward the minor in Religious Studies

  • Professor: Dr. Rebecca Raphael

    Day/Time: TR 2:00-3:20

    Location: CMAL 103

    CRN: 39989

    Description: The focus of the course will be contemporary democracy and the threats, internal and external, that challenge its health and continued existence. The course will take a global and interdisciplinary approach to the study of democracy and its enemies.

    Counts As:  Advanced philosophy, advanced political science, or international studies/international relations elective.

  • Professor: Dr. Vicente Lopes

    Day/Time: MW 3:30PM-4:50PM

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 39717

    Description: What is the future of humanity on earth?  How do the intuitive awareness of the oneness of life, the interdependence of its multiple manifestations, and its cycles of change affect that future?  How does science affect our attitude toward the natural world?

    Counts As: Advanced Biology or Advanced Philosophy

     

  • Professor: Dr. Alberto Giordano

    Day/Time: MW 2:00-3:20

    Location: ELA 384

    CRN: 39907

    Description: This course examines the Holocaust as a complex historical event and frames the Holocaust in the context of, and in comparison to, other genocides. The course is explicitly geographical in methods and subject matter, focusing on how the Holocaust and genocide are planned, implemented, and experienced differently in different places.

    Counts As: GEO 4393F

  • Professor: Prof. Jordan Morille

    Day/Time: TR 11:00A - 12:20P

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 39179

    Description: Develop basic professional techniques and skills used in writing for the screen. Analyze contemporary scripts, perform practical exercises in story and character development, study screenplay structure and format, and develop a full-length screenplay. The seminar and workshop format provide opportunities for weekly readings and critiques to assist writers in refining their scripts.

    Counts As: Adv Theatre, Adv. English Group D, or counts toward the Minor in Media Studies

  • Professor: Dr. Gilbert Martinez

    Day/Time: TR 9:30A - 10:50A

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 39180

    Description: This course focuses on U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to the First Amendment and the five rights of religion, speech, press assembly, and petition.  By examining how the high court has interpreted the First Amendment, students will learn about the government’s sometimes wavering commitment to our nation’s most cherished rights.

    Counts As: MC 4301 or advanced Political Science

  • Professor: Prof. Anne Winchell

    Day/Time: TR 3:30-4:50

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 39181

    Description: Anyone who tries to make a distinction between education and entertainment doesn't know the first thing about either." - Marshal McLuhan
    This course will examine how stories are crafted to fit new interactive media, how these new stories resemble traditional stories from the literary canon, and what these unorthodox plots, characters, and games reveal about the players and video game writers.

    Counts As: ANTH 3309 or ENG 3307, 3327, 3328, 3329, or 3340

  • Professor: Dr. Frances Le Duc

    Day/Time: MW 3:30-4:50

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 39182

    Description: This course introduces students to urban landscape and the regional environment and the role the two play in the quality of life. Students will look at people-plant interactions as they relate to art, science, practice, and commercial products and services of Horticulture, and the impact that land use decisions have on the sustainability of the environment.

    Counts As: Advanced Horticulture elective

  • Professor: Dr. Richard Warms

    Day/Time: MW 12:30-1:50

    Location: ELA 220

    CRN: 39429

    Description: Reviews central issues in economic anthropology, using both case studies and theoretical writings. Analyzes production, exchange, distribution, consumption, property, economic surplus, inheritance, and types of economic structure. Materials will cover hunter-gatherer societies, simple agricultural societies, pre-capitalist complex state societies, and issues of development in non-industrialized countries.

    Counts As: ANTH 3360

  • Professor: Dr. Augustine Agwuele

    Day/Time: MW 2:00-3:20

    Location: ELA 229

    CRN: 39895

    Description: This course is an introductory overview of human speech sounds. It describes speech anatomy and pays particular attention to the description of the acoustic and articulatory properties of speech as it occurs in real time. Students will study articulatory, acoustic, and auditory phonetics.

    Counts As: Advanced Anthropology elective

  • Professor: Dr. Shaunna Smith

    Day/Time: MW 12:30-1:50

    Location: ED 2112

    CRN: 39183

    Description:  Examine multidisciplinary concepts applied within makerspaces and complete hands-on design projects using beginner-level do-it-yourself techniques, including “upcycling” recyclable materials, 2D subtractive manufacturing (i.e. CNC machines that trim acrylic, cardboard, vinyl), 3D additive manufacturing (i.e. 3D modeling, printing), textiles (i.e. embroidery, sewing), and electrical circuits (i.e. micro-controllers, sensors).

    Counts As: MU 3370, ARTT 3370 (for non-art majors), or TH 3370 component for Interdisciplinary Studies (EC-6) majors.

  • Professor: Dr. Maria Czyzewska

    Day/Time: T 6:30P - 9:20P

    Location: UAC 205

    CRN: 39990

    Description: The course examines clinical, legal and psychosocial conditions of adults who, due to mental illness, developmental impairments, brain injuries or aging, are declared "incapacitated" and have court-appointed guardians. Students will serve as probate court representatives, (i.e., Court Visitors) who inspect living conditions/services for individuals under court-ordered guardianships (service learning component).

    Counts As: PSY 3338 (may require additional instructor approval)

  • Professor: Dr. Flore Chevaillier

    Day/Time: TR 9:30-10:50

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 39184

    Description: Today, the human body interrelates with ideas of identity, society, and fashion; it has become something that can be written and read. In this class, we will focus on writings and artifacts about the body’s cultural significance. At the end of the semester, we will attempt to define (or re-define) what our bodies mean to us and to society. In the process, you will perfect your skills of careful reading, sound researching, and convincing arguing.

    Counts As: ENG 3336

  • Professor: Dr. Robert Price

    Day/Time: TR 12:30-1:50

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 39185

    Description: Economic changes such as continued workplace automation and markedly slower growth imply big changes in social stratification in coming years. This course explores work and stratification in light of the “jobless economy” thesis, recent proposals for a universal basic income, and related likely cultural consequences.

    Counts As: SOCI 3324 or counts as a Business Advanced Elective

  • Professor: Dr. Shuying Sun

    Day/Time: TR 12:30-1:50

    Location: DERR 235

    CRN: 39186

    Description: This is an interdisciplinary course with a focus on the analysis of genetics and bioinformatics data. This course will cover basic genetics, statistics, programming, and cutting-edge research topics on statistical genetics and bioinformatics. Students will have hands-on experience of analyzing different types of genetic and bioinformatic data.

    Counts As: Advanced BIO elective, advanced MATH elective or advanced Computer Science elective

  • Professor: Prof. Jordan Morille

    Day/Time: MW 12:30-1:50

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 39718

    Description: Dramatic Adaptation is a writing course where students will be adapting non-dramatic works into stage plays. The course will begin with an introduction of the dramatic form, with regards to adaptation, in both principles and structure. Students will then create and write their own adaptations for the stage.

    Counts As: TH 4330X

  • Professor: Dr. Lawrence Fulton

    Day/Time: TR 3:30-4:50

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 39904

    Description: This course uses the scaffolding of gambling and sports betting to engage students in applied probability and statistical modeling. The course covers both descriptive and inferential methods. Topics include measures of central tendency, dispersion, and shape; probability and probability distributions; sampling distributions; estimation, hypothesis testing, linear models, and non-parametric analysis.

    Counts As: QMST 2333 "Business Statistics"; MATH 2328 "Elementary Statistics"

  • Professor: Dr. Nicole Taylor

    Day/Time: TR 11:00-12:20

    Location: ELA 229

    CRN: 39906

    Description: Linguistic anthropologists believe that language not only reflects but also shapes and creates our social worlds. This class will focus on how language shapes our embodied identities and our deeply held beliefs through exploration of linguistic, cultural, and medical anthropological research and that of related social sciences.

    Counts As: Counts as upper-level anthropology elective; course may be offered coincident with ANTH 3376Z  - "Language and the Body."

  • Professor: Dr. Claire Canavan

    Day/Time: TR 2:00-3:20

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 39188

    Description: From technology to the arts, the ideals of creativity and innovation are hotter then ever. But what exactly is creativity? This interdisciplinary course will draw on diverse perspectives (psychology, science, and arts) as we explore what it means to be creative and how to be more creative in our lives.

    Counts As: TH 3361 or TH 4330D

  • Professor: Dr. Colleen Myles

    Day/Time: TR 2:00-3:20

    Location: ELA 384

    CRN: 39905

    Description: Political ecology considers how power relations and politics, as a form of society and culture, influence environmental systems and management. This course applies the concepts of political ecology to science fiction case studies as a means to uncover latent human-environment interactions and explore similar processes in the real world.

    Counts As: Geography upper-level elective or GEO 4309 

  • Professor: TBD

    Day/Time: ARR

    Location: ARR

    CRN: 39189

    Description: This course is designed for students to pursue an independent project of research, study, or creative achievement to fulfill the thesis requirement for graduating in the Honors College. Students in this non-credit bearing version of a thesis course are often enrolled in a similar course in their discipline. Visit www.txstate.edu/honors/thesis/process for enrollment instructions.

  • Professor: TBD

    Day/Time: MW 2:00P - 3:20P

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 39190

    Description: This course will assist Honors students by exposing them to a systematic study of contemporary research methods appropriate for research on their theses. Prospective thesis supervisors and library research facilitators will insure that participating students understand both the mechanics and expectations of preparing an Honors Thesis.

  • Professor: Dr. Ron Haas

    Day/Time: ARR

    Location: ARR

    CRN: 39191

    Description: A course designed to allow students in the Honors College to pursue an independent project of research, study or creative achievement, culminating in a paper, laboratory problem, field research problem or creative effort of some size and scope. Visit www.txstate.edu/honors/thesis/process for enrollment instructions.

  • Professor: Dr. Ron Haas

    Day/Time: W 6:30-9:20

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 39192

    Description: Individual study under direct supervision of a professor for Honors credit. May involve field trips. This course may be repeated for credit but a student may not a exceed six hours of credit in Honors Independent Study. Interested students should contact Dr. Ron Haas at rmh109@txstate.edu for more information.



Fall 2018 Courses

Departmental Courses

  • Professor: Dr. Ann Watkins

    Day/Time: TR 2:00 - 3:20

    Location: MCOY 125

    CRN: 17289

    Description: This course introduces financial accounting concepts and their application in the accounting process for business organizations, including financial statement preparation, analysis and communication of financial information and related ethical responsibilities.

  • Professor: Dr. Suni Dharmasiri

    Day/Time: TR 9:30 - 10:50

    Location: SUPP 153

    CRN: 17874

    Description: This course provides the students with a strong foundation in cellular and molecular biology. Topics include biochemistry, energy metabolism, molecular bases of gene regulation and protein functions, cell division and control, and cell signaling. This course is required for all biology majors and is not recommended for non-science majors.

  • Professor: Dr. Andrea Aspbury

    Day/Time: MW 11:00A - 12:20P

    Location: IGRM 3203

    CRN: 16005

    Description: This course provides science majors with a foundation in organismal biology, Mendelian and population genetics, evolution and ecology. Topic include: patterns of inheritance, genetics, evolution, speciation, phylogenetics, and behavioral population, community, and ecosystem ecology. This course is required for all biology majors and is not recommended for non-science majors.

  • Professor: Dr. Alexis Stokes

    Day/Time: MW 12:30P - 1:50P

    Location: MCOY 225

    CRN: 13239

    Description: A survey of basic features of the American legal system and legal aspects of business transactions. Topics include the nature and sources of law, court systems and procedures, agency, torts, contracts, ethics, and government regulation of business.

  • Professor: Dr. Sean Kerwin

    Day/Time: TR 2:00P - 3:20P

    Location: CHEM 304

    CRN: 14705

    Description: TBD

  • ***Students must also choose CS 1428 HL1 or HL2 as the lab component.

    Professor: Dr. Apan Qasem

    Day/Time: TR 11:00A-12:20P

    Location: DERR 240

    CRN: 11096

    Description: Introductory course for computer science majors, minors and others desiring technical introduction to computer science. Contains overview of history and structure of the digital computer, including binary data representation. Problem solving, algorithm development, structured programming, good coding style, and control structures of C++ are emphasized.

  • Professor: Prof. Jaya Kommuru

    Day/Time: R 12:30P - 1:50P

    Location: DERR 325

    CRN: 11107

    Description:

    Introductory course for computer science majors, minors and others desiring technical introduction to computer science. Contains overview of history and structure of the digital computer, including binary data representation. Problem solving, algorithm development, structured programming, good coding style, and control structures of C++ are emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 1315 or MATH 1317 or MATH 1319 or MATH 1329 or MATH 2417 or MATH 2471, with a grade of "C" or better, or ACT Mathematics score of 24 or more, SAT Mathematics score of 520 or more, SAT Math Section score of 550 or more. 
  • Professor: Prof. Jaya Kommuru

    Day/Time: T 12:30P - 1:50P

    Location: DERR 325

    CRN: 11106

    Description:

    Introductory course for computer science majors, minors and others desiring technical introduction to computer science. Contains overview of history and structure of the digital computer, including binary data representation. Problem solving, algorithm development, structured programming, good coding style, and control structures of C++ are emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 1315 or MATH 1317 or MATH 1319 or MATH 1329 or MATH 2417 or MATH 2471, with a grade of "C" or better, or ACT Mathematics score of 24 or more, SAT Mathematics score of 520 or more, SAT Math Section score of 550 or more. 
  • Professor: Dr. Jennifer Forrest

    Day/Time: MW 2:00PM - 3:20

    Location: CENT G02

    CRN: 16686

    Description: This course introduces students to the history of French Cinema from the medium's origins in 1895 to the late 1950s. Students will learn about major developments in film narrative and technology in France from the silent to the classic eras. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

  • Professor: Dr. Eugene Curtin

    Day/Time: MWF 9:00A - 9:50A

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 16232

    Description: This is the first course in differential and integral calculus which stresses limits as well as the applications of calculus to the problems of science.

  • Professor: Dr. Eugene Curtin

    Day/Time: TR 8:00A - 9:20A

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 16233

    Description: TBD

  • Professor: Dr. Vaughn Baltzly

    Day/Time: TR 9:30A - 10:50A

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 13530

    Description: A study of universal philosophical problems and their solutions with a view toward developing clear thinking about knowledge, belief, and value. Approximately one half of this course will focus on the student’s critical thinking skills. Credit cannot be given for both PHIL 1305 and PHIL 3301.

  • Professor: Dr. Cynthia Opheim

    Day/Time: MW 2:00P - 3:20P

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 18047

    Description: A survey of the principles of political science, of the American system of government, and of the origins and development of the constitutions of the United States and Texas. Satisfies the legislative requirements for teacher certification.

  • Professor: Dr. Vince Bagnulo

    Day/Time: MWF 10:00A - 10:50A

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 18048

    Description: This course is a study of functions performed in the American system of government, both national and state, within the framework of the U.S. and Texas Constitutions.

  • Professor: Dr. Vicki Brittain

    Day/Time: TR 9:30am-10:50am

    Location: UAC 305

    CRN: 19632

    Description: This course examines the American Legal System. Emphasis will be placed on the origins and development of law, the different sources of law, the process of legal research and analysis, and methods for interpreting and applying constitutional, statutory and case law.

  • Professor: Prof. Jordan Morille

    Day/Time: MWF 10:00A - 10:50A

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: TBD

    Description: An introductory course designed to give the student a fundamental understanding of the creation and appreciation of diverse modes of expression through the visual and performing arts. This course may not be repeated for credit by taking ART 2313, DAN 2313, or MU 2313.

Core Curriculum Courses

  • Professor: Prof. Anne Winchell

    Day/Time: TR 5:00P - 6:30P

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 19097

    Description: This course examines communication through writing to promote positive change in the world. This course will enable students to communicate their own arguments appropriate to the subject, occasion and audience. Students will choose a global issue on which to focus their writing, and perform related community service.

    **Satisfies Communication - Writing Emphasis (010)

  • Professor: Drs. Bob Fischer & James McWilliams

    Day/Time: MW 2:00P - 3:20P

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 14977

    Description: This course examines the changing nature of, and views about, the production and consumption of animals in America from the 18th century to the present. The course will focus on the ethical and philosophical issues raised by eating animals.

    **Satisfies Language, Philosophy, and Culture Component Code 040

  • Professor: Dr. Greg Moses

    Day/Time: MW 11:00A - 12:20P

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 15650

    Description: This course examines nonviolence as the systematic endeavor to break cycles of violence, poverty, and racism. The course will focus on investigating the ongoing force of such cycles and to formulate effective understandings for subverting and reversing such trends to offer productive contributions toward more sustainable human development.

    **Satisfies Language, Philosophy, and Culture Component Code 040

  • Professor: Dr. Kevin Mooney

    Day/Time: MW 12:30P - 1:50P

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 18491

    Description: This course examines the lives and creative contributions of Texas women composers, performers, historians, and patrons, and their roles in the promotion and advancement of the arts, especially music, in Texas. This course will address topic-related issues of class, race, and identity formation. 

    **Satisfies Creative Arts Code 050

  • Professor: Dr. Peter Siegenthaler

    Day/Time: MW 11:00A - 12:20P

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 15044

    Description: Through studying memoirs this course focuses on American history since the end of the Reconstruction period. The memoirs, depicting interactions among individuals, communities, states, the nation, and the world, provide an understanding of how these interactions have contributed to the development of the United States and its global role. 

    **Satisfies American History Code 060

  • Professor: Prof. Oren Renick

    Day/Time: TR 12:30P - 1:50P

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 14978

    Description: This study of baseball focuses on American history since the end of the Reconstruction period. As a testing ground for the persistence of racial prejudice and the expansion of civil rights, and with advances in technology and management structure, the study of baseball will expose the American experience. 

    **Satisfies American History Code 060

  • Professor: Dr. Ron Haas

    Day/Time: TR 11:00A - 12:20P

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 18951

    Description: This course introduces students to the major political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural developments in American history through Reconstruction with a special emphasis on the origins and evolution of the tradition of American exceptionalism. Students will evaluate America’s national ideology through an analysis of primary source documents and scholarly debate.

    **Satisfies American History Code 060

  • Professor: Dr. Ron Haas

    Day/Time: TR 2:00P - 3:20P

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 18952

    Description: This course introduces students to the major political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural developments in American history through Reconstruction with a special emphasis on the origins and evolution of the tradition of American exceptionalism. Students will evaluate America’s national ideology through an analysis of primary source documents and scholarly debate.

     

    **Satisfies American History Code 060

  • Professor: Prof. Amanda North

    Day/Time: MW 12:30P - 1:50P

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 17805

    Description: By studying literary, mythic and philosophical works selected with special attention to narratives about the origins of humanity and civilization, students will encounter a variety of explanations of human existence. The course will broaden students' perspectives and provide insight into the background of contemporary world cultures.

    **Satisfies Communication Code 090 and 094 (Literature)

  • Professor: Prof. Stephanie Noll

    Day/Time: TR 12:30P-1:50P

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: TBD

    Description: This course provides students the opportunity to consider the human impact of several global conflicts that have occurred over the past forty years by focusing on novels, short stories, essays, and a memoir written about post-World War II conflicts in Vietnam, the Balkans, Iraq, and Afghanistan.

    **Satisfies Communication Code 090 and 094 (Literature)

     

  • Professor: Dr. Debra Monroe

    Day/Time: TR 3:30P - 4:50P

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 17806

    Description: Students will read, discuss, and write about poems, fiction, and essays to analyze the end of life. Analysis will encompass literary, sociological, and psychological perspectives on death.

    **Satisfies Texas State Area Communication Code Option 090 (Literature) or may count as advanced English elective (Group B) with prior approval

  • Professor: Dr. Catherine Jaffe

    Day/Time: TR 9:30A - 10:50A

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 17807

    Description: An in-depth study of 16-17th century Spanish, medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque ideas, values, and culture in the study of Cervantes' Don Quixote, the first truly modern novel. Students will examine the novel's literary antecedents and its reception through the twenty-first century. 

    **Satisfies Texas State Communication Code 090 (Literature), may count as SPAN 3301, 4380B, or 4390 with prior approval, or may count toward the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Minor with prior approval

  • Professor: Dr. Michael Burns

    Day/Time: MW 3:30P - 4:50P

    Location:ASBN 353

    CRN: 17808

    Description: This course develops presentational speaking and storytelling skills through the lens of TED Talks. Students will view and discuss well-received TED Talks and practice the verbal and nonverbal behaviors related to effective communication. This course also focuses on interpersonal and small group communication skills related to presentational speaking.

    **Satisfies Texas State Communication Code 090 (Communication)

  • Professor: Prof. Amanda North

    Day/Time: MW 3:30P - 4:50P

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 19173

    Description: Students will read and analyze representative authors and works from British Literature. The course examines works in historical, social, and cultural context as a record of human experience. Courses employ a variety of teaching methods.

    **Satisfies Communication Code 090 and 094 (Literature)

Honors Courses

  • Professor: Dr. Max Warshauer

    Day/Time: MW 3:30P - 4:50P

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 11911

    Description: This course is the systematic study of problems using definitions and logical deductions from these definitions. Elementary number theory provides an ideal medium for such a study since all basic types of mathematical proofs occur in a setting requiring no prior background. 

    **Counts as MATH 3330 or may be taken for Mathematics Core 020 with prior approval

  • Professor: Prof. Jordan Morille

    Day/Time: MW 11:00A - 12:20P

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 15545

    Description: This course develops the basic professional techniques and skills used in writing for the theatrical stage. Students analyze scripts and perform practical exercises in story and character development, study dramatic play and structure and develop a full-length dramatic play. Weekly readings and critiques assist writers in refining their scripts.

    **Counts for Advanced Theater elective or may count as advanced English elective (Group D)

  • Professor: Dr. Dianne Rahm

    Day/Time: TR 3:30P - 4:50P

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 14420

    Description: This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to U.S. policy for energy, the environment, and sustainability. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the laws, regulations, and treaties that oversee air and water pollution, solid waste, hazardous waste, energy use, natural resources, climate change, and global governance for energy, environment, and sustainability. 

    **Counts for International Studies elective or POSI 4322

  • Professor: Dr. Jessica Pliley

    Day/Time: TR 9:30A - 10:50A

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 17809

    Description: This course seeks to historicize the global migration of sex workers and the modern-day anti-sex trafficking movement by tracing the origins of the anti-white slavery movement in the late nineteenth century to the debates about sex work and sex trafficking of the twenty-first century. 

    **Counts for Advanced HIST elective, Advanced Criminal Justice elective, POSI 3395, POSI 4330-Group II, POSI 4304-Group III, POSI 4326-Group V, or International Studies elective

  • Professor: Prof. Bill Poston

    Day/Time: M 5:00P - 7:50P

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 15957

    Description: This course is designed to elevate the performance of leaders. Students are challenged to develop their potential in seminar-style sessions covering leadership definitions, theory, frameworks, and the global application of skills. Students explore their behaviors, motivations, values, influences, and character in an effort to increase self-awareness and to think critically. 

    **Counts for Advanced Business elective for Business majors or MGT 3303 for Business minors

  • Professor: Prof. Diann McCabe

    Day/Time: TR 12:30P - 1:50P

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 17810

    Description: What has the act of walking meant historically and what does it mean today? What has been written about the experience of walking? What insights can walking with reflection bring? Students will explore these questions through readings in literature, history, and philosophy, and through art and the act of walking. 

    **Counts for ENG 3311 or ENG 3340

  • Professor: Dr. Peter Golato

    Day/Time: TR 3:30P - 4:50P

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 18766

    Description: Readings and discussions will concern human language's evolution, its representation in the mind/brain, and its learning by native and non-native speakers. Topics will include: evidence for language in other species including homo neanderthalensis; whether human language is innately specified; and similarities and differences between first and second language acquisition. 

    **Counts as: FR 4390, SPAN 4390, GER 4390, or LING 4390

  • Professor: Dr. Maria Czyzewska

    Day/Time: T 6:30P - 9:20P

    Location: UAC 205

    CRN: 16699

    Description: The course examines clinical, legal and psychosocial conditions of adults who, due to mental illness, developmental impairments, brain injuries or aging, are declared "incapacitated" and have court-appointed guardians. Students will serve as probate court representatives, (i.e., Court Visitors) who inspect living conditions/services for individuals under court-ordered guardianships (service learning component).

    **Counts for PSY 3338

  • Professor: Dr. Rachel Romero

    Day/Time: MW 12:30P - 1:50P

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 16599

    Description: Both art and science attempt to shed light on aspects of the human experience; yet modern society often presents these forms as dissimilar, merely opposites. In this course we will explore arts-based methodological research tools, and use artistic means in the process and presentation of social inquiry.

    **Counts as Advanced Sociology elective

  • Professor: Dr. Vaughn Baltzly

    Day/Time: TR 11:00AM - 12:20PM

    Location: LAMP 502B

    CRN: 19326

    Description: What are an individual’s moral obligations to their community, nation, and world? How do governments and economic systems shape these obligations? Are capitalism and socialism really opposites? This course investigates these questions, and others, through the interdisciplinary study of “PPE,” an emerging field that draws from philosophy, politics, and economics.

     

    **Counts as PS 3313 "Contemporary Political Theory" or advanced philosophy elective.

  • Professor: TBD

    Day/Time: ARR

    Location: ARR

    CRN: 18767

    Description: This course is designed for students to pursue an independent project of research, study, or creative achievement to fulfill the thesis requirement for graduating in the Honors College. Students in this non-credit bearing version of a thesis course are often enrolled in a similar course in their discipline.

  • Professor: Dr. Peter Tschirhart

    Day/Time: MW 2:00P - 3:20P

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 11912

    Description: This course will assist Honors students by exposing them to a systematic study of contemporary research methods appropriate for research on their theses. Prospective thesis supervisors and library research facilitators will insure that participating students understand both the mechanics and expectations of preparing an Honors Thesis.

  • Professor: Dr. Peter Tschirhart

    Day/Time: MW 5:00P - 6:30P

    Location: ASBN 353

    CRN: 14418

    Description: This course will assist Honors students by exposing them to a systematic study of contemporary research methods appropriate for research on their theses. Prospective thesis supervisors and library research facilitators will insure that participating students understand both the mechanics and expectations of preparing an Honors Thesis.

  • Professor: Dr. Ron Haas

    Day/Time: ARR

    Location: ARR

    CRN: 11913

    Description: A course designed to allow students in the Honors College to pursue an independent project of research, study or creative achievement, culminating in a paper, laboratory problem, field research problem or creative effort of some size and scope.

  • Professor: Dr. Ron Haas

    Day/Time: ARR

    Location: ARR

    CRN: 11914

    Description: Individual study under direct supervision of a professor for Honors credit. May involve field trips. This course may be repeated for credit but a student may not a exceed six hours of credit in Honors Independent Study.

Summer 2018 Course List

  • Summer I

    Professor: Dr. Bob Fischer
    Day/Time: MTWRF  12:00P - 1:40P
    Location: CMAL 103
    CRN: 52943

    Description: By examining the moral and existential questions raised by our own mortality, students in this course will practice critical thinking and examine the variety of human responses to and understanding of death by focusing on how ideas, values, beliefs, and other aspects of culture express and affect human experience.

     

    *Satisfies Language, Philosophy, and Culture Component (3 hours) Code 040

  • Summer I

    Professor: Dr. Ron Haas
    Day/Time: MTWRF 2:00P - 3:40P
    Location: LAMP 502B
    CRN: 51383

    Description: This course in the history of American social and protest movements from the end of Reconstruction through Occupy focuses in particular on the movements of the 1960s - the Civil Rights Movement, the New Left, the Women's and Homosexual Liberation Movements, and the Counterculture - and their enduring legacies in contemporary society. Course meets every weekday during the summer session.

    **Satisfies American History Code 060

  • Summer II

    Professor: Prof. Amanda North
    Day/Time: MWF 4:00 - 6:50P
    Location: LAMP 502B
    CRN: 52986

    Description: By studying literary, mythic and philosophical works selected with special attention to narratives about the origins of humanity and civilization, students will encounter a variety of explanations of human existence. The course will broaden students' perspectives and provide insight into the background of contemporary world cultures.

    **Satisfies Communication Code 090 and 094 (Literature)

  • Summer II

    Professor: Dr. Michael Burns
    Day/Time: MTWRF 12:00P - 1:40P
    Location: LAMP 502B
    CRN: 51613

    Description: This course examines technology's impact on human communication. Students will examine their dependency on technology in order to re-humanize communication. Students will learn to express ideas through the development of interpersonal, small group, and presentational communication skills, developing command of oral, aural, written, and visual literacy in appropriate contexts. Course meets every weekday during the summer session.

    **Texas State Area Option Code 090 (Communication)

  • Summer I

    Professor: Prof. Jordan Morille
    Day/Time: MTWRF 2:00P - 3:40P
    Location: ASBN 353
    CRN: 52944

    Description: This course develops the basic professional techniques and skills used in writing for the writing and theatrical stage. Students analyze scripts and perform practical exercises in story and character development, study dramatic play and structure, and develop a full-length dramatic play. Weekly readings and critiques assist writers in refining their scripts. Course meets every weekday during the summer session.

     

    **Advanced Theatre or advanced English Group D

  • Summer II

    Professor: Prof. Jordan Morille
    Day/Time: MTWRF 2:00P - 3:40P
    Location: ASBN 353
    CRN: 52945

    Description: This course develops the basic professional techniques and skills used in writing for the screen. Students analyze contemporary scripts and perform practical exercises in story and character development, study screenplay structure and format, and develop a full-length dramatic screenplay. Course meets every weekday during the summer session.

    **Advanced Theatre, advanced ENG Group D, or counts toward the minor in Media Studies

  • Professor: Dr. Ron Haas

    Day/Time: ARR

    Location: ARR

    CRN: 51615

    Description: Individual study under direct supervision of a professor for Honors credit. This course may be repeated for credit but a student may not a exceed six hours of credit in Honors Independent Study. Contact Dr. Ron Haas at rmh109@txstate.edu for more information.