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Course Archives

(Discontinued Honors Course Numbers)

The Honors College maintains an archival record of discontinued course numbers for academic advising purposes. These are courses which have only changed course numbers and will still be offered under a new course number.


 

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  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309A

    Substitution(s):  ENG 1310 or ENG 1320 or ENG 2330 or ENG 3341 or humanities or ethnic studies minor
    Professor(s):  D. Lochman, R. Randolph, D. McCabe, N. Wilson, L. Kosmitis
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 1998, Fall 1999, Fall 2000, Fall 2001, Fall 2003, Fall 2004, Fall 2005, Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015
    Course Description:  A study of literary, mythic and philosophical works selected with special attention to narratives about the origins of humanity and civilization. The course assumes that study of a variety of explanations of human existence will broaden students' perspectives and provide insight into the background of contemporary world cultures. Students will respond to readings in short papers designed to stimulate class discussion, class presentations, a documented paper, and a final examination. Students in this course will be treated to guest lectures from a rabbi and representatives from the Islamic center in Austin. In addition, students will take a field trip to visit a Buddhist place of worship and a Hindu place of worship.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309F

    Substitution(s):  COMM 1310
    Professor(s):  S. Beebe
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2004, Summer 2007, Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2014, Spring 2016
    Course Description:  This course uses the writing and life of C.S. to examine communication theory and principles. Lewis's work as a speaker, teacher, broadcaster and educator provides a comprehensive body of work that students can evaluate as they master and apply rhetorical and communication theories

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2301A

    Counts As: Communication Component Code 010
    Professor(s): A. Winchell
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2014
    Course Description: This course examines communication through writing to promote positive change in the world. This course will enable students to communicate their own arguments appropriate to the subject, occasion and audience. Students will choose a global issue on which to focus their writing, and perform related community service.
  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2303B

    Counts As: Math/Science/Logic for BA or PHYS 1340 or PHYS 1350, Life and Physical Sciences 030
    Professor(s):  D. Olson
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 1994, Spring 1996, Spring 1998, Spring 2000, Spring 2002, Spring 2004, Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2016
    Course Description:  In this class, students will combine astronomy and humanities. They will create computer simulations of past celestial events. These results will be combined with evidence gathered from primary sources to investigate how astronomy affected history or appeared in historical art or literature. 

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2302B

    Substitutions(s):  MATH 1315 or 4336
    Professor(s):  D. Ferrero
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2004, Spring 2005, Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015
    Course Description:  This course will present the most important topics of graph theory through its applications and in a lively style, including some examples of proofs designed to strengthen mathematical techniques, and offer challenging opportunities to have fun while doing mathematical research. The course is intended to be self-contained, so no prior knowledge of graph theory is required.

  • Counts as Life and Physical Science Component Code 030

    Professor: H. Galloway

    Semester offered: Summer 2015 in Cambodia

    Course Description: Students will use basic scientific principles to investigate resource usage in our daily lives from the production of electrical energy and construction of housing to daily consumption including HVAC systems and major utilities. Students will compare energy conservation programs across the glove and evaluate how public policy effects energy consumption.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2303A

    Counts As: Life and Physical Sciences Component Code 030
    Professor(s):  E. Close, H. Galloway
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2014, Summer II 2015
    Course Description: Course content includes both physics concepts and research findings on physics teaching and learning. Students will develop a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in physical science and how these concepts relate to making sense of everyday experiences. This studio-styled physics course is ideal for pre-service K-8 teachers.
  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309B

    Counts As: Texas State Component Code 090
    Professor(s): M. Burns
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2015
    Course Description: This course examines technology's impact on human communication. Students will examine their dependency on technology in order to re-humanize communication. Students will learn to express ideas through the development of interpersonal, small group, and presentational communication skills, developing command of oral, aural, written, and visual literacy in appropriate contexts.
  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2306B

    Counts As: American History Component (6 hours) Code 060
    Professor(s): T. Hindson, C. Renick
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 1993, Fall 1996, Fall 1999, Fall 2002, Fall 2005, Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015
    Course Description: This study of baseball focuses on American history since the end of the Reconstruction period. As a testing ground for the persistence of racial prejudice and the expansion of civil rights, and with advances in technology and management structure, the study of baseball will expose the American experience.
  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2306C

    Counts As: American History Component Code 060
    Professor(s): R. Brown, M. Brennan, R. Haas
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 1990, Fall 1991, Fall 1992, Fall 1993, Fall 1994, Spring 1995, Spring 1996, Spring 1998, Spring 2000, Spring 2001, Spring 2002, Spring 2005, Spring 2007, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015
    Course Description: This course in the history of American social and protest movements from the end of Reconstruction through Occupy focuses in particular on the movements of the 1960s - the Civil Rights Movement, the New Left, the Women's and Homosexual Liberation Movements, and the Counterculture - and their enduring legacies in contemporary society.
  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309G

    Substitution(s):  ENG 1320 or ENG 2360 or humanities
    Professor(s):  S. Hanson
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 1997, Spring 2000, Spring 2001, Fall 2002, Spring 2004, Spring 2005, Spring 2006, Spring 2007, Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015
    Course Description:  After exploring the origins of American nature writing, we will read and discuss the works of a number of contemporary authors. In the process, we will consider the ways in which human beings experience the natural world — as an object of study, as a reflection of themselves and as a lens through which they look for meaning in their lives.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2307A

    Counts As: Government/Political Science Component Code 070
    Professor(s):  K. Grasso
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2002, Spring 2003, Spring 2005, Spring 2007, spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013
    Course Description: This course is a study of functions performed in the American system of government, understood through the framework of Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville's seminal study of American social and political life, the nature and distinctive character of modern democratic societies, and the problems and perils these societies confront.
  • Counts as:  Sophomore literature, SPAN 3301, 4380B, or 4390, or may count toward the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Minor
    Professor(s):  C. Jaffe
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 1997, Fall 2003, Fall 2006, Fall 2009, Spring 2015, Spring 2017
    Course Description:  What is truly modern about the novel, Don Quixote? How does it compare to the historical context of 17th century Europe? Students will examine the novel to uncover the lasting influence of Cervantes' groundbreaking work. As of Spring 2017 this course will be offered as HON 2309N.

  • Counts as: MATH 2328, SOCI 3307 or Advanced Theatre
    Professor(s):  S. Zinkgraf and J. Hood
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2011
    Course Description: This introductory course applies descriptive statistics, probability and inferential statistics to the study of Shakespeare.  Students will also apply these statistical tools to the study of other liberal arts disciplines such as psychology, sociology, education, geography and others.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309L

    Substitution(s):  COMM 1310 or advanced speech communication
    Professor(s):  R. Mandziuk
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2000, Fall 2001, Fall 2002, Fall 2003, Fall 2004, Fall 2007, Fall 2009, Fall 2011, Fall 2013
    Course Description:  Communication is a complex human process, enveloping perceptions, values, self-concepts, meanings and behaviors. All of these elements are rooted in the cultural context. Indeed, we are shaped and defined by the contemporary culture into which we are born more than we may realize; the culture gives us images to model, goals to aspire to, values to espouse, and tells us who we are or who we should want to be. To understand our contemporary culture and its influence on communication, this course takes a historical step backward to look at its roots. At the turn of the 20th century, roughly 1880-1930, we can find the beginnings of so much of what we now take for granted: social patterns, mass media, modern technologies, interpersonal perceptions and world views. This period of time initiated the cultural fabric that we are still enmeshed in: consumerism.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2305A

    Counts As: Creative Arts Component (3 hours) Code 050
    Professor(s): N. Schuler
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2003, Fall 2005, Fall 2011, Spring 2016
    Course Description: This course is a reading-, writing-, and listening-intensive interdisciplinary survey of African-American popular music in America and its relationship to American culture, society, politics and the other arts.
  • Counts as: Advanced English
    Professor(s):  D. Gilb
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2006
    Course Description: Latinos are becoming the largest "minority" group in the country. This course will cover "la onda"--the wave of Latino writers of fiction, essays, and poetry and their literary contributions to life in the U.S.

  • Counts as: PSY 3314 or 3341
    Professor(s):  G. Lumina
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2006
    Course Description: This course addresses the philosophical, evolutionary, behavioral, neural and cultural nature of consciousness. Students will study the role of consciousness and the relationship to concepts of self, and to psychiatric and neurological medicine.

  • Counts as: Advanced Mass Comm, Advanced POSI, or counts toward the U.S. Ethnic Studies Minor
    Professor(s):  F. Subervi
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2008
    Course Description: This course examines the relationship between mass media and politics, with a special focus on Latinos. Key literature is reviewed, but the goal is to engage in original research to assess the role of media and the DNC's and GOP's communication strategies in the 2008 elections, especially among Latino voters.

  • Counts as: Advanced History Group A or counts toward the Medieval and Renaissance minor
    Professor(s): E. Makowski
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2006
    Course Description: Using literature, art, and film, this course examines the popular image of the European Middle Ages known as the Dark Ages. Students will investigate the concept which originated in the Renaissance, and manifested into the 21st century.

  • Counts as: Sophomore literature, advanced English, or International Studies: Asian Focus
    Professor(s): N. Wilson
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2006
    Course Description: Study of the history, anthropology, sociology, art, literature and music of the South Pacific will capture an informed image of the region.

  • Substitution(s):  PSY 3334
    Professor(s):  H. Ginsburg
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2006
    Course Description:  This course is intended to help students appreciate cultural diversity and common unifying experiences leading to jazz, a uniquely American musical form.
     

  • Counts as: Advanced Philosophy or counts toward the Religious Studies minor
    Professor(s): J. Gordon
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2006
    Course Description: This course will examine critical arguments against religion.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309M

    Substitution(s):  Sophomore literature, advanced English, or counts toward U.S. ethnic studies minor
    Professor(s):  Holt, E
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2007
    Course Description:  Students will examine/analyze selected raps in terms of the artists' use of African American language practices such as narrativizing, braggadocio, signifying and semantic inversion, a practice hip-hoppers call "flippin' the script." When the script is flipped, bad means good and down means up. The course will also consider other aspects of hip-hop culture such as film, literature, fashion, identity and politics.

  • Counts as: ART 2313 or 4301
    Professor(s): J. Housefield
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2007
    Course Description: This course explores the interaction between the visual arts and music since the late 19th century. Students will see from "behind the scenes" the process of curating and presenting a major museum exhibition of contemporary art.

  • Counts as: Advanced Mass Communication or MC 4382P
    Professor(s): D. Laird and J. Oskam
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2011
    Course Description: This class will provide an overview of the theory and practice of designing, producing and evaluating health-communication campaigns.  We will examine persuasive approaches to behavioral change; audience, message and channel factors in campaign development.  Our work will include communication approaches, including mass media, but with emphasis on social marketing and "new media."        

  • Counts as: Art 2313 or upper division Art History
    Professor(s): E. Chiles
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2011
    Course Description: This course explores how nature and phenomena are rendered in art through looking at both historical and contemporary art in the mediums of drawing, painting, sculpture, video, photography, performance and installation.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309C

    Substitution(s):  Sophomore Literature, Advanced English Group C, Advanced Philosophy, or Advanced Political Science
    Professor(s):  S. Morrison; E. Makowski
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2014, Fall 2015
    Course Description:  This interdisciplinary course examines the dilemmas that arise when individual desires conflict with the needs of society. Students analyze exemplary, original texts from the humanities tradition from the Classical period through the early modern era using the perspectives of literature, political theory, history and philosophy.
  • Counts as: Advanced Philosophy or counts toward the Media Studies minor
    Professor(s): J. Gordon
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2007
    Course Description: This course examines films concerned with the meaningfulness of life.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309H

    Substitutions(s):  Sophomore literature, advanced English, or arranged (varies by semester)
    Professors(s): Castillo and Harney, Weimer, Grasso and Martin, Raphael and Martin, Jaffe and DeHart
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015
    Course Description:  This interdisciplinary course examines the dilemmas that arise when individual desires conflict with the needs of society. Students analyze exemplary, original texts from the humanities tradition from the Enlightenment through the present using the perspectives of literature, political theory, history and philosophy.

  • HON 3394R, Modern Art and Life: A Curatorial Seminar.
    Substitutions(s):  ART 2313
    Professors(s): Housefield
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2008
    Course Description:  This interdisciplinary course examines the intersection of art and life in the careers of artists who contributed to the birth of modern art. Students will learn about modern art’s history and museum operations as they help to curate a major exhibition based on works in a local collection.
     

  • Counts as: Sophomore literature or advanced English
    Professor(s): D. Monroe
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2008
    Course Description: This course examines post WWII British novels to better understand social life, dialogue, and the collision of incompatible belief systems.

  • Counts as: Advanced Theatre, advanced English, sophomore literature, or advanced Management
    Professor(s): J. Hood and S. Zinkgraf
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2009
    Course Description: This seminar course examines Shakespeare’s approaches to leadership and management through the perspective of his dramatic works.  In combination with lectures and class discussions, this study is accomplished through individual and collaborative research and presentation projects conducted by students during the semester.

  • Counts as: International Studies elective, ECO 3322, POSI 4350, or counts toward the Women's Studies minor
    Professor(s): A. Brooks
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2011
    Course Description: This seminar examines the ways in which international development is implemented in Southeast Asia. 

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309D

    Substitution(s):  SPAN 4350, 4330, or 3371, ENG 2340, 3341, or 3316, or HIST 3325H, Advanced English Group C
    Professor(s): S. Ugalde             
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2010, Spring 2013, Spring 2015, Fall 2015
    A study of selected works of Nobel Prize author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, focusing on literature, history, politics, and popular culture of Latin America.
  • Substitution(s): Advanced elective for the Religious Studies minor, Sophomore Literature, or Advanced Political Science
    Professor(s): Monroe, D            
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2010
    Course description: The Protestant Reformation weakened the notion of a homogenous, central religion, as did the theories of Charles Darwin and Sigmund Freud.  Yet the sense that God was no longer a collective concept, but a private belief did not seem mainstream until the twentieth century.  We will study five novels that explore this shift.

  • Substitution(s): Art 2313 or Upper Division Art History
    Professor(s): Duganne, E
    Semster(s) Offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2011
    This course focuses on images of blackness in the postwar period in the United States. It explores the complex ways in which blackness has been figured and represented in postwar America. Students will gain a historical sense of the variegated ways that artists have represented blackness in their works through conceptual art and performance.
     

  • Counts as: Advanced Biology or Natural Science Component
    Professor(s): P. Williams, H. Flores
    Semster(s) Offered: Spring 2008

    Course Description: A course which focuses on the uses of plants and the roles plants have played in shaping the history of the world. The course stresses interdisciplinary, diversity, and multiculturalism, and is designed to provide an in-depth integrated overview of the biology, chemistry and culture of plants placed in historical perspective.
     

  • Counts as:  Advanced Fashion Merchandising or Family & Consumer Science Elective
    Professor(s):  G. Hustvedt
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2009, Spring 2011
    Course Description:  Fibers to Fabric focuses on the role of fiber products in the development of a sustainable future. Through interdisciplinary investigations, the course seeks to provide an in-depth understanding of fiber science and examine various environmental, historic, economic, and social issues in order to evaluate current and emerging approaches to sustainability.

  • Counts as: Geography required elective for the following Geography majors: Resources and Environmental Studies, Urban and Regional Planning, or general Geography major
    Professor(s):  J. Vaughn
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2012
    Course Description:  This course examines the human and environmental impacts of urbanization and critically assesses applied techniques that are being made, or proposed, to develop cities in truly sustainable ways. Students will investigate the origins and concepts of sustainable development, as well as the application of sustainable solutions to today's urban problems.

  • Counts as: FCC 4347, SOC 3337, SOC 3338, or counts toward the SOC GER minor
    Professor(s): M. Canabal
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2008
    Course Description: This course focuses on the study of the interaction/interface between the demands of work and family roles, especially toward policies in the US and the effect on diverse family structures.

  • Counts as: Social and Behavioral Science Component or advanced Anthropology
    Professor(s): N. Hadder
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2008
    Course Description: This course explores how cultural and aesthetic values, history, and the scientific record are constructed and interpreted by the process of representation in museum exhibits.

  • Counts as: MATH 1315 or 4302
    Professor(s): A. Sorto & T. McCabe
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2009
    Course Description: This course provides students the opportunity to create and teach mathematical lessons for children that integrate algebra and geometry--building their own mathematical understanding using inquiry based methods.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2304A

    Counts as: upper division elective in Philosophy, PHIL 1320 with approval
    Professor(s: J. Gordon, R. Fischer
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2008, Fall 2012
    Course Description: By examining the moral and existential questions raised by our own mortality, students in this course will practice critical thinking and examine the variety of human responses to and understanding of death by focusing on how ideas, values, beliefs, and other aspects of culture express and affect human experience.
  • Counts as: Sophomore literature, advanced English, or advanced Theatre
    Professor(s): J. Hood
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2008
    Course Description: This seminar examines contemporary human issues and values through the perspective of dramatic works for the stage. In combination with lectures and class discussions, this study is accomplished through research and critique projects conducted and presented by each student during the semester.

  • Counts as: MC 3355
    Professor(s): E. Subervi
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2010
    Course Description: This course provides frameworks for critical thinking, analyses and teaching about media.  It also explores the increasingly large and diverse organizations and resources that have been developed over the last two decades pertaining to media and news literacy.  Creative hands-on production projects will also be optional learning tools.

  • Counts as: TH 4330C or upper level Theatre elective
    Professor(s): P. Bishop
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2011
    Course Description: This course examines contemporary social and political folly through the use of improvisational skills via the use of theatre games and experiential exercises. Through class participation, students will consider and sharpen their personal points of view through humor and satire, improve their listening skills, learn to think on their feet, trust their instincts, and improve their ability to concentrate and focus.

     

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309E

    Substitution(s): ENG 1310, 1320, Sophomore Literature, or Advanced English Group C
    Professor(s): S. Noll
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015
    Course Description: Examines the human impact of several global conflicts that have occured over the past forty years. Students will explore interdisciplinary knowledge of various aspects of the human experience in times of conflict.
  • Counts as: Sophomore literature, advanced English, or International Studies elective
    Professor(s): N. Wilson
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2011
    Course Description: This course explores the culture of South Asia via its highly provocative literature, including religious texts such as The Bhagavad Gita, as well as contemporary texts by writers such as Salman Rushdie and Manil Suri.  We will contextualize our literary discussions by examining the region’s history, religious history, religions, and culture.

  • Counts as: Advanced English
    Professor(s): K. Ledbetter
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2012
    Course Description:  This course will explore literature published during the English Victorian period in tandem with articles, literature, illustrations, advertising, and news items published in popular Victorian periodicals. By considering periodicals and literature in context with each other, students will be able to examine a cross-section of Victorian culture, get a more intimate understanding of the development of communication and mass media in western civilization, and learn the relevance of the Victorian period to our own media moment.

  •  

    Substitution(s): MC 4382O
    Professor(s): S. Rao
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2012
    Course Description: This seminar/lab explores techniques of writing journalistic travel narratives for the media including (online and traditional) newspapers and blogs. Students will develop and write travel stories using diverse, interdisciplinary approaches. Students will learn information-gathering and interviewing skills, and narrative techniques pertinent to travel writing.

  • Counts as: Advanced Art History, advanced Theatre, advanced English, or counts toward the Media Studies minor
    Professor(s): A. Macor
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2012
    Course Description:  This course explores the history of screenwriting in American film making. It is not a class that teaches screenwriting technique. Rather, this course examines how the script has been regarded within the film industry over time, taking a historical perspective on screenwriting and the role of the screenwriter as each has developed throughout film history.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2301B

    Counts as: Communication Component (6 hours) Code 010
    Professor(s): L. Ellis-Lai
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2015
    Course Description: By studying a person, a group of people, an institution, or a concept, students will create carefully researched written "portraits" that integrate personal narrative, interviews, and academic research. Students will communicate their own arguments and develop ideas about the effect of the message to foster understanding and to communicate persuasively.
  • Counts as: MC 3355 or upper division POSI Group II
    Professor(s): F. Subervi
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2012
    Course Description:  The course examines the relationships between mass media and politics, with a special focus on ethnic minority groups, particularly Latinos, during the current presidential campaign. Key literature is reviewed, but the goal is to engage in original research to assess the role of ethnic-targeted communication processes in the current election.

  • Counts as: Advanced English
    Professor(s): S. Morrison
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2009
    Course Description: This course explores the field of waste studies to integrate the material reality and historical practices regarding excrement in written and figurative texts.

  • Counts as: Advanced English or advanced Art
    Professor(s): A. Campbell
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2010
    Course Description: The purpose of this course is to familiarize students, from analysis to creation, with the graphic novel. Because graphic novels don't easily fit into prescribed categories, this course is based on the assumption that graphic novels are a form/media unto themselves, necessarily in dialogue with a variety of other forms/media.

  • Counts as: Sophomore literature or advanced English
    Professor(s): C. Jones
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2010
    Course Description: This course will explore contemporary issues of childhood and teen human sexuality, including depictions of gender and orientation, in fiction and nonfiction for children and adolescents.  We will additionally explore pedagogical, social, and political issues arising from and informing societal perceptions and enactments of sexuality.

  • Counts as: FR 4390, LING 4390, SPAN 4312 or 4390
    Professor(s): Y. Beale-Rivaya
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2010
    Course Description: This course aims to address the gap between learning a second language and the skills needed for teaching through first hand observational experience in the second language classroom. 

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2306E

    Substitution(s): HIST 1310 or HIST 3342
    Professor(s):  A. Murphy
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013
    Course Description: What is the individual and human element in the study of history? How have individuals both affected and been affected by larger historical events and trends like the American Revolution, the expansion of white democracy, western expansion, the market revolution, the slave labor system, the sectional crisis, and the Civil War? Students will assess the ways in which biography as a genre can serve as a vital form of history.
  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2306A

    Substitution(s): HIST 1320
    Professor(s): P. Seigenthaler
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2015
    Course Description: This course presents American history since the late 19th century in a way that differs from the standard survey format. The memoir-centered approach will provide students with an opportunity to build their own understanding of historical events by seeing them first hand through the eyes of the thoughtful observers of the times and then in the content of broader secondary literature. Featured memoirs will relate American history "from the margins," including voices of Native peoples, African-Americans, political and cultural dissidents, and recent immigrants.
  • Counts as: ART 2313 or advanced Art & Design
    Professor(s): E. Chiles
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2012
    Course Description: In this course we will discuss and discover how artists and writers from all over the world have approached finding or being present to the Everyday. We will discuss political and social ramifications of involvement: what it means for us to reconfigure a prescribed space.

  • Counts as: ART 2313
    Professor(s): A. Campbell
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2012
    Course Description: This course investigates what it means to have bad taste and in so doing students will gain an understanding of how discussions of taste are linked to the innumerable ways in which people (though their behavior or choice of aesthetic objects) place themselves/are placed into hierarchies of knowledge and power.

  • Counts as: MU 2313, advanced Sociology elective, or counts toward the Popular Culture minor
    Professor(s): J. Hood
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2012
    Course Description:  This workshop course engages students in the cultural history and sociology of the United States from the perspective of songs, which are studied as persuasive exemplars that subtly shape public opinion and boldly inspire public action. Students integrate their study and interests by creating effective songs and lyrics.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2306D

    Substitution(s): HIST 1310 or 3368B
    Professor(s): S. Duffy
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2014
    Course Description: This course is an in-depth investigation into the social and legal culture of Early America through the study of microhistories. This course concentrates on a series of capital crimes, ranging from murder to witchcraft. The time period from the 17th century through the Age of Jackson. Microhistories, a relatively new form of history, use the legal records surrounding a single court case, in combination with other primary records such as probates, wills, execution sermons and newspaper accounts, to open a window into the lives of a community at that particular time and place.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2304B

    Substitution(s): PHIL 1320 or Advanced HIST elective
    Professor(s): R. Fischer; J. McWilliams
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015
    Course Description: This course has two aims: first, to introduce students to the changing nature of, and views about, the production and consumption of animals in America from the 18th century to the present; second, to introduce students to the philosophical issues raised by the practice of eating animals.
  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309I

    Substitution(s): ENG 2360, 3336, or 3340
    Professor(s): C. Marquiss
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2015
    Course Description: This course examines plot in major contemporary American novels and stories (1985-present), both as a driving force in the work(s) and as a reflection of recent American history. Students will have an opportunity to explore living writers and an unfolding literary landscape in terms of plot, conventions, and source material -- an interdisciplinary study of the real and imagined events that shape who we are in this place and time.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309J

    Substitution(s): ENG 2360 (Group-B American), or ENG 3340
    Professor(s): R. LeBlanc
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2014
    Course Description: Whether due to improved diagnostic testing, the effects of an increasingly toxic environment, heritability, or a combination of these, the population with disabilities, disorders, and mental diseases is expanding. To understand the growing neurologically disabled, disordered, and mentally ill population and our perceptions of them and ourselves, we will analyze memoirs and aesthetic works by this true fringe group. We will also consider what being fundamentally different means, and how labels affect people in and out of the neurotypical majority.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2308A

    Substitution(s):  ANTH 3360
    Professor(s):  R. Warms
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2015
    Course Description: Reviews central issues in economic anthropology, using both case studies and theoretical writings. Analyzes production, exchange, distribution, consumption, property, economic surplus, inheritance, and types of economic structure. Materials will cover hunter-gatherer societies, simple agricultural societies, pre-capitalist complex state societies, and issues of development in non-industrialized countries.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2309K

    Substitution(s):  ENG 2340 or advanced English Group B
    Professor(s):  D. Monroe
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2015
    Course Description: A story or poem is finite. Life is too. When we arrive at its end, we hope to understand its meaning, or, as Peter Brooks said, “to connect ends and beginnings and make of the middle a highly charged field of force.” Stories and poems about death provide this opportunity.

  • Removed: Spring 2016 - Replaced with course number HON 2305B

    Substitution(s): MU 2313 or Counts towards the Women's Studies Minor or the Music Minor
    Professor(s):  K. Mooney
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2015
    Course Description: This honors course examines the lives and contributions of Texas women composers, performers, historians, and patrons and their roles in the promotion and advancement of the state’s music. Conducted in both lecture and class discussion formats, this course will address topic-related issues of class, race, and identity formation.
  • This course examines the arts, culture and society of the island of Bali, Indonesia, with special attention to the practice and study of traditional musical forms and structures. The course also explores contemporary artistic trends and the impact of technology and tourism on the arts.