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Honors Course Catalog

The Honors College maintains an archival record of all currently and previously taught courses for academic advising purposes. If you do not see a course you may have taken on this page please take a look at our Course Archives page because the course number may have changed.

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  • Counts as: Communication Component Code 010
    Professor(s): A. Winchell
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2017
    Course Description: This course examines communication through writing to promote positive change in the world. This course will enable students to communicate their own arguments appropriate to the subject, occasion and audience. Students will choose a global issue on which to focus their writing, and perform related community service.

    Taught under previous course number HON 1390L: Fall 2013, Fall 2014

  • Counts as: Communication Component (6 hours) Code 010
    Professor(s): L. Ellis-Lai
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2016
    Course Description: By studying a person, a group of people, an institution, or a concept, students will create carefully researched written "portraits" that integrate personal narrative, interviews, and academic research. Students will communicate their own arguments and develop ideas about the effect of the message to foster understanding and to communicate persuasively. Previously taught under HON 3395X.
  • Counts as: Mathematics Component (3 hours) Code 020
    Professor(s): M. Warshauer
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2015
    Course Description: Students will examine ideas about integers to construct proofs of some of the basic theorems of number theory. Working in groups, students will rediscover a love of mathematics. See HON 3392V
  • Counts as:  Mathematics Code 020 or Math 4336
    Professor(s):  D. Ferrero
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2016, Spring 2018
    Course Description:  This course will present the most important topics of graph theory through its applications and in a lively style, including some examples of proofs designed to strengthen mathematical techniques, and offer challenging opportunities to have fun while doing mathematical research. The course is intended to be self-contained, so no prior knowledge of graph theory is required.

    Taught under previous course number HON 2380D: Fall 2004, Spring 2005, Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014,

  • Counts As: Life and Physical Sciences Component Code 030

    Professor(s):  H. Galloway
    Semester(s) Offered: 
    Course Description: Course content includes both physics concepts and research findings on physics teaching and learning. Students will develop a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in physical science and how these concepts relate to making sense of everyday experiences. This studio-styled physics course is ideal for pre-service K-8 teachers. Previously taught by Dr. Eleanor Close under HON 2380I.
  • Counts as: Life and Physical Sciences Code 030 or may also count as Math/Science/Logic for BA.
    Professor(s):  D. Olson
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2016, Spring 2018
    Course Description: In this class, students will combine astronomy and humanities. They will create computer simulations of past celestial events. These results will be combined with evidence gathered from primary sources to investigate how astronomy affected history or appeared in historical art or literature. 

    Taught under previous course number HON 2380B: Spring 1994, Spring 1996, Spring 1998, Spring 2000, Spring 2002, Spring 2004, Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2012, Spring 2014,

  • Counts as: Language, Philosophy, and Culture Component (3 hours) Code 040
    Professor(s: R. Fischer
    Semester(s) Offered: Summer 2017
    Course Description: By examining the moral and existential questions raised by our own mortality, students in this course will practice critical thinking and examine the variety of human responses to and understanding of death by focusing on how ideas, values, beliefs, and other aspects of culture express and affect human experience.
     
    Taught under previous course number HON3395J.
  • Counts as: Language, Philosophy, and Culture Component (3 hours) Code 040
    Professor(s): R. Fischer & J. McWilliams
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2016
    Course Description: This course examines the changing nature of, and views about, the production and consumption of animals in America from the 18th century to the present. The course will focus on the ethical and philosophical issues raised by eating animals.
     
    Taught under previous course number HON 3396Z: Fall 2013, Fall 2014
  • Counts as: Language, Philosophy, and Culture Code 040
    Professor: R. Moses
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2016
    Day/Time: TR 3:30 - 4:50PM
    Course Description: Nonviolence is often understood as the lack of violence, but this course will explore nonviolence as the presence of a certain discipline of discernment and empowerment that can be investigated in relation to emerging calls for sustainable development. Nonviolence as articulated by Martin Luther King, Jr. may be understood as a systematic endeavor to break cycles of violence, poverty, and racism. Students will investigate the ongoing force of such cycles and formulate effective understandings for subverting and reversing such trends. Since the cycles of violence, poverty, and racism tend to be degrading and destructive to human living conditions, a considered reversal of these cycles would offer productive contributions toward more sustainable human development. Therefore, a presentation of nonviolence in the context of sustainability would foster dialogue between two important areas of concern.

  • Substitution(s):  Creative Arts Code 050.
    Professor(s):  N. Schuler
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2016, Spring 2018
    Course Description: This course is a reading, writing, and listening intensive,
    interdisciplinary survey of African-American popular music in America and its relationship to American culture, society, politics and the other arts. Previously taught as HON 3393U.

  • Counts as: Creative Arts Component (3 hours) Code 050
    Professor(s): K. Mooney
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2018
    Course Description: This course examines the lives and creative contributions of Texas women composers, performers, historians, and patrons, and their roles in the promotion and advancement of the arts, especially music, in Texas. This course will address topic-related issues of class, race, and identity formation.
     
    Taught under previous course number HON 3397Q.
  • *Also listed as HON 3398A

    Counts as: Creative Arts Code 050 or may be taken for an Advanced Art History elective
    Professor: K. Moore
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2016
    Course Description: This course will challenge the traditional account of the development of Italian Renaissance art by exploring connections to Islamic culture of the surrounding Mediterranean world.  Students will be introduced to visual analysis and interdisciplinary research techniques by which art and architecture can be used as documents in the interpretation of history.

  • Counts as: American History Component (6 hours) Code 060
    Professor(s): P. Siegenthaler
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2016
    Course Description: Through studying memoirs this course focuses on American history since the end of the Reconstruction period. The memoirs, depicting interactions among individuals, communities, states, the nation, and the world, provide an understanding of how these interactions have contributed to the development of the United States and its global role. Previously taught as HON 3396N
  • Counts as: American History Component (6 hours) Code 060
    Professor(s): T. Hindson, C. Renick
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2016
    Course Description: This study of baseball focuses on American history since the end of the Reconstruction period. As a testing ground for the persistence of racial prejudice and the expansion of civil rights, and with advances in technology and management structure, the study of baseball will expose the American experience.
     
    Taught under previous course number HON 2391F: Fall 1993, Fall 1996, Fall 1999, Fall 2002, Fall 2005, Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015
  • Counts as: American History Component Code 060
    Professor(s): R. Brown, M. Brennan, R. Haas
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018
    Course Description: This course in the history of American social and protest movements from the end of Reconstruction through Occupy focuses in particular on the movements of the 1960s - the Civil Rights Movement, the New Left, the Women's and Homosexual Liberation Movements, and the Counterculture - and their enduring legacies in contemporary society.
     
    Taught under previous course number HON 2391G: Fall 1990, Fall 1991, Fall 1992, Fall 1993, Fall 1994, Spring 1995, Spring 1996, Spring 1998, Spring 2000, Spring 2001, Spring 2002, Spring 2005, Spring 2007, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015
  • Counts as: American History Code 060 or can be taken for HIST 3368B

    Professor: S. Duffy

    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2016

    Description: This course is an in-depth investigation into the social and legal culture of Early America through the study of microhistories. This course concentrates on a series of capital crimes, ranging from murder to witchcraft. The time period from the 17th century through the Age of Jackson. Microhistories, a relatively new form of history, use the legal records surrounding a single court case, in combination with other primary records such as probates, wills, execution sermons and newspaper accounts, to open a window into the lives of a community at that particular time and place.

    Taught under previous course number HON 3396V: Spring 2014

  • Counts as: American History Component (6 hours) Code 060
    Professor(s): A. Murphy
    Semester(s) Offered:
    Course Description: This course will examine early American history, from colonial times through 1877, through the lens of biography. Students will not only read biographical works on past figures but also analyze autobiographical writings that shed light on their lives. 
     
    Taught under previous course number HON 3396L
  • Professor: Dr. Ron Haas

    Day/Time: TR 11:00A - 12:20P

    Location: LAMP 501

    CRN: 18951

    Description: This course introduces students to the major political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural developments in American history through Reconstruction with a special emphasis on the origins and evolution of the tradition of American exceptionalism. Students will evaluate America’s national ideology through an analysis of primary source documents and scholarly debate.

    **Satisfies American History Code 060

  • Counts As: Government/Political Science Component Code 070
    Professor(s):  K. Grasso
    Semester(s) Offered: 
    Course Description: This course is a study of functions performed in the American system of government, understood through the framework of Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville's seminal study of American social and political life, the nature and distinctive character of modern democratic societies, and the problems and perils these societies confront.
     
    Taught under previous course number HON 2391X: Spring 2002, Spring 2003, Spring 2005, Spring 2007, spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013
  • Counts as: Government/Political Science Code 070 or may be taken for Advanced Political Science
    Professor: K. Ward
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2016
    Course Description: Students will consider conflicts between liberty and equality with emphasis on how these principles are defined within the American system of constitutional government. Students will examine literature addressing race, gender, class, and sexuality in relation to events such as national elections, and to works in modern and contemporary political thought.

    Taught under previous course number HON 3394S.

  • Counts as: Social and Behavioral Sciences Component (3 hours) Code 080

    Professor(s): R. Warms

    Semester(s) Offered:

    Course Description: This course covers central issues in economic anthropology including the production, exchange, distribution, consumption, property, economic surplus, inheritance, and types of economic structure in various cultures. Materials will cover hunter-gatherer societies, simple agricultural societies, pre-capitalist complex state societies, and issues of development in non-industrial countries.
     
    Taught under previous course number HON 3397L: Spring 2015
  • Counts as: Texas State Area Option Code 090 (Literature) or may count as ENG 3341 or may count toward the Minor in Ethnic Studies
    Professor(s): D. Lochman, D. McCabe, N. Wilson, L. Kosmitis, A. North
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018

    Course Description: By studying literary, mythic, and philosophical works selected with special attention to narratives about the origins of humanity and civilization, students will encounter a variety of explanations of human existence. The course will broaden students' perspectives and provide insight into the background of contemporary world cultures.

    Taught under previous course number HON 1390E: Fall 1998, Fall 1999, Fall 2000, Fall 2001, Fall 2003, Fall 2004, Fall 2005, Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015

  • Counts as: Texas State Component Code 090 (Communications)
    Professor(s): M. Burns
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2017
    Course Description: This course examines technology's impact on human communication. Students will examine their dependency on technology in order to re-humanize communication. Students will learn to express ideas through the development of interpersonal, small group, and presentational communication skills, developing command of oral, aural, written, and visual literacy in appropriate contexts.
     
    Taught under previous course number HON 2390N: Fall 2014, Fall 2015
  • Counts as: Texas State Component Area Code 090 (Literature) or may be taken for advanced ENG Group C
    Professor(s): S. Morrison & E. Makowski, E. Skerpan-Wheeler & K. Ward, R. Tally & R. Raphael,
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2016
    Course Description: By studying classical foundational texts in Western culture from interdisciplinary perspectives, students will understand the origin of great ideas and relate them to today's world. Texts are chosen around a particular theme by a team of instructors to focus on the earliest recorded works up to the Renaissance.
     
    Taught under previous course number HON 3394N: Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2014
  • Counts as: Texas State Component Area Code 090 (Literature) or may be taken for SPAN 4350, 4330, or 3371, ENG 2340, 3341, or 3316, or HIST 3325H, orAdvanced English Group C
    Professor(s): S. Ugalde
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2015
    Course Description: A study of selected works of Nobel Prize author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, this course offers unique insights into Latin American culture, filtered through the literary and journalistic vision of Colombia's world renowned author. Additional readings and films emphasize the complex nature of the Latin American culture and literature.
     
    Taught under previous course number HON 3394X: Spring 2010, Spring 2013, Spring 2015
  • Counts as: Texas State Component Area Code 090 (Literature) or may be taken for advanced English Group C

    Professor(s): S. Noll
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2016
    Course Description: This course provides students the opportunity to consider the human impact of several global conflicts that have occurred over the past forty years by focusing on novels, short stories, essays, and a memoir written about post-World War II conflicts in Vietnam, the Balkans, Iraq, and Afghanistan.
     
    Taught under previous course number HON 3395P: Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014
  • Counts as:  Texas State Area Option Code 090 (Communications)
    Professor(s):  Beebe, S.
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2018

    Course Description: This course uses the writing and life of C.S. to examine communication theory and principles. Lewis's work as a speaker, teacher, broadcaster and educator provides a comprehensive body of work that students can evaluate as they master and apply rhetorical and communication theories.  

    Taught under previous course number HON 1390G: Fall 2004, Summer 2007, Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2014

  • Counts as:  Texas State Area Option Code 090 (Literature)
    Professor(s):  S. Hanson
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2017
    Course Description:  After exploring the origins of American nature writing, we will read and discuss the works of a number of contemporary authors. In the process, we will consider the ways in which human beings experience the natural world — as an object of study, as a reflection of themselves and as a lens through which they look for meaning in their lives.

    Taught under previous course number HON 2391V: Fall 1997, Spring 2000, Spring 2001, Fall 2002, Spring 2004, Spring 2005, Spring 2006, Spring 2007, Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

  • Counts as: Texas State Area Option Code 090 (Literature) or may count as advanced English or arranged

    Professors: C. Castillo & L. Harney, Jaffee & P. DeHart, R. Raphael & R. Tally, C. Martin & R. Raphael, B. Locklin & K. Ward, C. Martin & K. Grasso, T. Weimer, J. Helgeson & K. Ward

    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018

    Course Description: By studying foundational texts in Western culture from interdisciplinary perspectives, students will understand the origin of great ideas and relate them to an understanding of today’s world. Texts are chosen around a particular theme by a team of instructors to focus on works from the Early Modern period to the present.

     

    Taught under previous course number HON 3394P.

  • Counts as: Texas State Area Option 090 or may be taken for ENG 3336 or 3340

    Professor: C. Marquiss

    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018

    Description: This course examines plot in major contemporary American novels and stories (1985-present), both as a driving force in the work(s) and as a reflection of recent American history. Students will have an opportunity to explore living writers and an unfolding literary landscape in terms of plot, conventions, and source material -- an interdisciplinary study of the real and imagined events that shape who we are in this place and time.

    Taught under previous course number HON 3397B

  • Counts as: Texas State Area Option Code 090 (Literature) or may be taken for ENG 3340

    Professor: R. LeBlanc

    Semesters offered: Spring 14, Spring 16

    Course Description: To understand the growing neurologically differently abled/disabled, –ordered, and mentally different/ill population and our perceptions of them and ourselves, we will analyze memoirs and aesthetic works by this true fringe group and consider what being fundamentally different means, and how labels affect people in and out of the neurotypical majority.

    Previously taught as HON 3397G.

  • Counts as: Texas State Area Code Option 090 (Literature) or may be taken for advanced English Group B

    Professor: D. Monroe

    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2017

    Description: A story or poem is finite. Life is too. When we arrive at its end, we hope to understand its meaning, or, as Peter Brooks said, “to connect ends and beginnings and make of the middle a highly charged field of force.” Stories and poems about death provide this opportunity.

    Taught under previous course number HON 3397M.

  • Counts as Texas State Area Option 090 (Communication) or can be taken as an advanced speech communication
    Professor(s):  R. Mandziuk
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2000, Fall 2001, Fall 2002, Fall 2003, Fall 2004, Fall 2007, Fall 2009, Fall 2011, Fall 2013, Spring 2016, Spring 2018
    Course Description:  Communication is a complex human process, enveloping perceptions, values, self-concepts, meanings and behaviors. All of these elements are rooted in the cultural context. Indeed, we are shaped and defined by the contemporary culture into which we are born more than we may realize; the culture gives us images to model, goals to aspire to, values to espouse, and tells us who we are or who we should want to be. To understand our contemporary culture and its influence on communication, this course takes a historical step backward to look at its roots. At the turn of the 20th century, roughly 1880-1930, we can find the beginnings of so much of what we now take for granted: social patterns, mass media, modern technologies, interpersonal perceptions and world views. This period of time initiated the cultural fabric that we are still enmeshed in: consumerism. Previously offered as HON 3393F.

  • Counts as: Texas State Area Option Code 090 (Literature) or may count as advanced English or towards the minor in Ethnic Studies
    Professor(s): E. Holt
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2016
    Course Description: Using poetry by Jay-Z and Kendrick Lamar as primary texts, students will analyze the artists’ political engagement, power to effect change, command of language and poetics, and struggle with identity formation. Students will also read and discuss The Plot Against Hip Hop as an introduction to the hip hop novel. Students will engage their critical thinking and reading skills to assess the literary merits of the selected texts and write their own original hip hop poetry or fiction.

    Taught under previous course number HON 3394J.

  • Counts as:  Texas State Area Option 090 (Literature) or make be taken for SPAN 3301, 4380B, or 4390, or may count toward the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Minor
    Professor(s):  C. Jaffe
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 1997, Fall 2003, Fall 2006, Fall 2009, Spring 2015, Spring 2017
    Course Description:  What is truly modern about the novel, Don Quixote? How does it compare to the historical context of 17th century Europe? Students will examine the novel to uncover the lasting influence of Cervantes' groundbreaking work.

    Taught under previous course number HON 3390J.

  • Counts as:  Health administration elective
    Professor(s):  E. Morrison
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2005, Fall 2007, Fall 2014
    Course Description:  This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and the practices of complementary/alternative medicine and how they integrate with the traditional health care system. Emphasis is placed on historical, cultural, social, research and consumer aspects of complementary/alternative medicine. Specific modalities will be studied with emphasis on use for self-care. Implications for changes in health care environments and health care provider roles will also be analyzed. Complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) is a consumer-driven and rapidly growing area in health care that is becoming more recognized by mainstream medicine. This course is designed to provide undergraduate students who are engaged in any aspect of health care with a basic understanding of CAM and its practices, which is based on current literature.

  • Counts as: MATH 2328
    Professor: A. Walker
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2018
    Course Description: This course engages students in active learning through statistical software, research studies, and simulations. Students will explore the elements of statistical thinking by collecting, modeling, and drawing conclusions from data while taking into account the nature of variability. Emphasis will be on engaging with real data and understanding statistical conclusions.

    Substitutes for PSY 2301 "Introduction to Statistics," but students must also enroll in PSY 2101 "Introduction to Statistics Laboratory."

  • Counts as:  Group A history
    Professor(s):  J. Yick
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 1992, Fall 1996
    Course Description:  This course will explore the Chinese Communist quest for an ideal society and the revolutionary and post-revolutionary ideologies that quest has produced from 1919 to present. The course will focus on the evolution of these ideologies and the political practice in consonance or disharmony with them.

  • Counts as:  ENG 2359
    Professor(s):  S. Wilson
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 1996, Spring 2009, Spring 2015
    Course Description:  An examination, through reading of significant works as well as a trip to important sites in New England, of the roots of American culture as it was influenced by the Puritans and Transcendentalists.

  • Counts as: International Studies or counts toward the Minor in Religious Studies
    Professor(s): A. Abunseir
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2009
    Course Description: This course will focus on educating students about basic history and cultural practicies related to Islam, the profit of Islam and Islam's holy book, The Koran. It will also focus on the relationship between the Arabic language, the Arabic culture and Islam so students will be able to distinguish between what is cultural and what is religious.
  • Counts as: International Studies or counts toward the Minor in Religious Studies
    Professor(s): A. Abunseir
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2009
    Course Description: This course will focus on educating students about basic history and cultural practicies related to Islam, the profit of Islam and Islam's holy book, The Koran. It will also focus on the relationship between the Arabic language, the Arabic culture and Islam so students will be able to distinguish between what is cultural and what is religious.
  • Counts as:  Social Work elective, Humanities core (040/041), or International studies: Asian, ME/Af, Interamerican, or European focus
    Professor(s): Hawkins, C
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2012, Fall 2013
    Course Description:  This course will examine spirituality and religion as a universal component of human life, explore the world’s major faith traditions, engage in critical inquiry of these traditions, investigate personal and cultural biases, and engage in focused self-awareness to assist students in expanding their global perspective.

  • Counts as: English 2360 or 3336
    Professor(s):  S. Wilson
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 1997, Spring 2001, Fall 2006, Spring 2011, Spring 2013
    Course Description:  An overview of the Beat movement of the 1940s and 1950s that will explore the Beat’s influence on social norms, literature and politics. We will also consider the enduring influences this small group of social outcasts has on modern America.

  • Counts as:  Advanced Philosophy or counts toward the minor in Religious Studies
    Professor(s):  P. Hutcheson
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 1995, Fall 1996, Fall 1997, Fall 1999, Fall 2001, Spring 2005, Spring 2007, Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2015, Spring 2017
    Course Description:  Is it reasonable to believe that there is an all-knowing, all-powerful, and all-good God, despite the appearance of pointless evil? The course consists of attempts to answer this question with rational arguments.

  • HON 3390K, Modern Democracy and its Enemies
    Substitution(s):  PHIL 1320 (prior to 2013 only), advanced philosophy, advanced political science, or international studies/international relations elective.
    Professor(s):  J. Gordon, R. Raphael
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2005, Fall 2006, Fall 2009, Fall 2012
    Course Description:  The focus of the course will be contemporary democracy and the threats, internal and external, that challenge its health and continued existence. The course will take a global and interdisciplinary approach to the study of democracy and its enemies.
     

  • Counts as:  Sophomore Literature, Humanities, Advanced English Group D, or Media Studies minor
    Professor(s):  R. Bell-Metereau
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2005, Spring 2009, Spring 2013
    Course Description:  This course offers a historical overview of a topic that appears with increasing frequency in films of the last decade — various forms of memory loss. We will explore how films about various forms of amnesia satisfy a viewer’s desire to come to terms with memory loss in an aging society and how the project of creating a state of constant cultural amnesia satisfies the needs of larger governmental and economic engines. (Prerequisites: English 1310 and 1320)

  • Counts as:  HIST 3311, ENG 3343, ENG 2340, SPAN 3370, SPAN 4380 or SPAN 3302
    Professor(s):  S. Ugalde
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2003
    Course Description:  How do the life and works of this 20th century Spanish playwright and poet reflect Spanish history, Andalusian folklore, gender and society, and literary styles? Themes will include the Spanish Civil War, gypsies and flamenco music, surrealism, and oral poetic traditions.

  • Counts as:  ENG 3311, 3316, International Studies: European focus, or counts towards the Media Studies Minor
    Professor(s):  C. Martin, U. Bach, A. Schaefer
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2004, Spring 2009, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2016, Spring 2018
    Course Description:  Students will examine the artistic, social, and critical concerns that emerged during this pivotal decade in  European film-making. Assigned screenings will include a diverse selection of films from France, Italy, Czechoslovakia, Spain, and Poland. Students will produce a vast body of writing on cinema, including screening reports, industry-related writing, and a conference-length paper. 

  • Counts as:  FR 4390 or SPAN 4390 or GER 4390 or LING 4390 or Group D English
    Professor(s):  A. Gragera
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2004, Fall 2014
    Course Description:  This course is designed for students who want to gain an understanding of psycholinguistics. Psycholinguistics provides insights into human cognition through the study of syntax, semantics and pragmatics. The study of language development in first and second language acquisition seeks to find universal principles that make human knowledge possible. The course will use lecture format as well as discussion groups. The students will be asked to solve linguistics problems related to each chapter in which the course is divided, as well as to write brief essays summarizing the scope of inquiry of the different fields of research within the field of linguistics and their respective state of the art.

  • Counts as:  Advanced Philosophy or advanced Psychology (for semesters prior to fall 2011, contact honors@txstate.edu for clarification).
    Professor(s):  D. Stimmel, P. Hutcheson, T. Hulsey
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 1991, Spring 1993, Spring 1994, Spring 1995, Spring 1997, Spring 1998, Spring 1999, Spring 2004, Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2015
    Course Description:  How does the neurobiological composition of your brain affect your beliefs? This course will examine modern theories concerning psychological, biological and philosophical origins of cognition.

  • Counts as:  Honors
    Professor(s):  M. DiMauro-Jackson
    Semester(s) Offered:  Summer 2015, summer 2016, summer 2017

    Course Description:  This study abroad course will center on students' experiences volunteering with non-profit or government institutions abroad. Discussions and written assignments will provide opportunities to analyze the volunteer experiences. Field trips will provide cultural components to add to the discussions and written assignments.

  • Counts as:  ENG 2360 or advanced English or media studies minor
    Professor(s):  R. Bell-Metereau
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 1999, Fall 2000, Fall 2002, Spring 2004
    Course Description:  How are gender, technology and body images depicted in film? This course examines the connection between film portrayals of gender and perceptions of the body of the "Other", as mediated through technology.

  • Counts as:  Advanced English Group D or RDG 3320
    Professor(s):  D. McCabe
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 1998, Spring 2000, Spring 2001, Spring 2005, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013
    Course Description:  Students will study the work of poet Kenneth Koch to learn how to teach children to read and write poetry. Using classical poetry and a "poetry idea," students will teach poetry to children in elementary and middle school classes, prepare books of the children's original poems, and hold children's poetry readings in the classrooms and in the library. Read about this course on the Texas State blog.

  • Counts as:  MATH 1315 or MATH 3330
    Professor(s):  M. Warshauer, T. McCabe
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 1997, Fall 1998, Fall 1999, Fall 1999, Fall 2000, Fall 2001, Fall 2003, Fall 2004, Fall 2005, Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016
    Course Description:  Elementary Number Theory allows students at different levels of mathematical maturity to participate and work together. Students will study simple ideas about the integers, where they already have a well-developed intuition. To paraphrase David Gries (Science of Programming), one should never take basic principles for granted, for it is only through careful application of simple fundamental ideas that progress is made. The division algorithm is studied in detail, and is seen to have far-reaching consequences throughout the course; it yields Euclid’s algorithm and the solution to linear Diophantine equations. Properties of divisibility also lead naturally to modular arithmetic and related questions about quadratic forms. Students explore quadratic residues, culminating w/ Legendre Symbols and a development of the Law of Quadratic Reciprocity.  See HON 2302A.
     
    For information on the Mathworks Math Explorations curriculum, which will be used in middle schools as of 2014-2015 school year, see this link.
  • Counts as:  Humanities or Advanced English Group C
    Professor(s):  E. Holt
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 1999, Fall 2001, Spring 2013
    Course Description:  Novels by contemporary African writers from western and southern Africa will be read and discussed. The class will also study the effects of colonialism on traditional African cultures. Students will consider problems of language in the African novel.

  • Counts as:  Advanced Philosophy or counts toward the Religious Studies Minor
    Professor(s):  P. Hutcheson
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2010, Spring 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2016, Spring 2018
    Course Description: Can it be shown that it is reasonable (unreasonable) to believe in life after death? What must a person be like in order to survive death? Is reincarnation plausible? What are the requirements for being one and the same person? The course will consist of attempts to answer these questions with rational arguments.

  • Counts as:  Advanced History Group A or Advanced English Group C
    Professor(s):  M. Menninger
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2001, Spring 2002, Spring 2005, Fall 2008, Fall 2011, Fall 2016
    Course Description:  Why does the turn of the 19th century seem an awful lot like the turn of the 20th century?  Why do recurrent themes emerge at the end of centuries?  This writing-intensive seminar considers European life in the years around 1900 with particular emphasis on Vienna and Paris.

  • Counts as: MGT 3360
    Professor(s):  J. Bell
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2003, Fall 2004, Spring 2007, Spring 2009, Fall 2011, Fall 2013, Spring 2016, Fall 2016
    Course Description:  This writing-intensive seminar examines the life stories of selected entrepreneurs, identifies leadership qualities that may have contributed to success, and explores research-based principles necessary for groups to become teams and for teams to become high performing. Using selected video tapes of successful entrepreneurs representing the public and private sectors who have spoken at Texas State, this course targets freshman- and sophomore-level students, and is designed to spark genuine interest in creating and identifying opportunities, but especially for turning ideas into substance and tangibles. Seeks to identify characteristics needed to become an entrepreneur or intrapreneur (someone who works within a large enterprise). The course also examines how to build a team and collation and explores leadership principles necessary for team-initiated and directed projects to prosper and succeed.

  • Counts as:  ENG 2330 or ENG 3341
    Professor(s):  K. Peirce
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2003, Spring 2007, Spring 2010, Fall 2012, Spring 2017
    Course Description:  What erotic reality lives in the most private and intense of verbal arts: the poem? What are the concepts of Eros when the other is the opposite? When the other is the same? When the other is divine? How do Neruda, Sappho, Rumi and the Song of Solomon treat these subjects?


  • Substitution(s):  NUTR 2360 or NUTR 3362
    Professor(s):  S. Crixell
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2003, Spring 2008, Fall 2009
    Course Description:  Is the Atkins Diet sound? How does diet affect health, weight and the prospect of successful aging? What is the scientific foundation of human nutrition and how does one evaluate the plethora of diet advice?
     

  • Counts as:  Advanced philosophy or international studies - Asian studies or counts toward women's studies minor
    Professor(s):  L. Yuan
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2005, Spring 2008, Fall 2012, Fall 2016
    Course Description:  This course compares contemporary Western feminist ethics and ancient Eastern thoughts regarding care. Each stresses personal relations and high moral value placed on care. The course is interdisciplinary and studies gender and multicultural issues through a focus on care-giving.

  • Counts as:  ENG 3341, HIST 4344, or International Studies: Asian Studies
    Professor(s):  P. Siegenthaler
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2006, Spring 2011, Spring 2014, Spring 2017
    Course Description:  Anchored by the world’s largest city, Edo, in the 18th century, Japanese society has long been shaped by a vibrant and distinctive urban culture. Using as primary texts readings in history, anthropology, literature and urban studies, as well as feature films, this course offers a historical look at the notable characteristics of the Japanese city.

  • Counts as:  Advanced history Group B, international studies: travel and tourism, international business or Asian studies
    Professors(s): P. Siegenthaler
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2008, Fall 2015
    Course Description:  Tourism in East Asia is growing at a remarkable rate. Looking at both its contemporary conditions and historical development, this course uses several disciplines to introduce students to the dynamics surrounding tourism in East Asia at the opening of the 21st century.

  • Counts as:  advanced English Group C
    Professor(s):  E. Makowski, E. & S. Morrison, E. Skerphan-Wheeler & K. Ward, R. Tally & R. Raphael
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015
    Course Description: By studying classical foundational texts in Western culture from interdisciplinary perspectives, students will understand the origin of great ideas and relate them to today's world. Texts are chosen around a particular theme by a team of instructors to focus on the earliest recorded works up to the Renaissance.

    Also offered as HON 2309C as of Fall 2016.

  • Counts as: ENG 2340, 3341, or advanced POSI Groups 1 and 2
    Professor(s):  C. Castillo & L. Harney, Jaffee & P. DeHart, R. Raphael & R. Tally, C. Martin & R. Raphael, B. Locklin & K. Ward, C. Martin & K. Grasso, T. Weimer
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Sp 2011, Sp 2012, Sp 2013, Sp 2014, Sp 2015, Spring 2016
    Course Description:  By studying foundational texts in Western culture from interdisciplinary perspectives, students will understand the origin of great ideas and relate them to an understanding of today’s world. Texts are chosen around a particular theme by a team of instructors to focus on works from the Early Modern period to the present. Also offered as HON 2309H beginning spring 2017.
  • Counts as:  Advanced theatre or Advanced English Group C
    Professors(s): Hood, J.
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2008, Fall 2014
    Course Description:  This seminar and process-oriented course examines the era of modern drama (late 19th century to 20th century) through text and performance. It provides an in-depth examination of selected playwrights, and provides a historical, literary and production perspective of modern drama.

  • Counts as:  POSI 2320 or Advanced Political Science
    Professor(s):  K. Ward Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2008

    Students will consider conflicts between liberty and equality with emphasis on how these principles are defined within the American system of constitutional government. Students will examine literature addressing race, gender, class, and sexuality in relation to events such as national elections, and to works in modern and contemporary political thought. As of Fall 2016, offered as HON 2307B.

  • HON 3394T, Social Class Collision: The Post WWII British Novel of Manners
    Substitution(s):  Sophomore Literature or Advanced English Group A
    Professor(s):  D. Monroe
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2008
    Course Description:  How did evacuations, air raid shelters, the rationing of food, clothes, and gas leveled material prospects and conditions force people who previously had limited interaction into unprecedented contact?  Study six novels that depict both the fluidity and eerie persistence of class distinctions in the post WWII the social landscape.
     

  • Counts as: International Studies, SoWk 3339 or SoWk 4360

    Professor(s): Hawkins, C.

    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Spring 2013

    Course Description: What are the significant social, political, philosophical, historical, legal, economic, geographic, and cultural factors that impact universal human rights? What are the challenges involved in implementing universal human rights; what efforts effectively redress inequity and what are the opposing viewpoints? Students will engage in critical intellectual inquiry and personal self-reflection in order to facilitate the development of a global perspective for the 21st century.

  • Counts as:  Advanced Biology or Advanced Philosophy

    Professor(s):  V. Lopes
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016
    Course Description:  What is the future of humanity on earth?  How do the intuitive awareness of the oneness of life, the interdependence of its multiple manifestations, and its cycles of change affect that future?  How does science affect our attitude toward the natural world?

  • Counts as:  Advanced Fashion Merchandising or Family & Consumer Science Elective
    Professor(s):  G. Hustvedt
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2009, Spring 2011
    Course Description:  Fibers to Fabric focuses on the role of fiber products in the development of a sustainable future.   Through interdisciplinary investigations, the course seeks to provide an in-depth understanding of fiber science and examine various environmental, historic, economic, and social issues in order to evaluate current and emerging approaches to sustainability.

  • Counts as:  MU 2313 or Advanced Music
    Professor(s):  C. Gonzales
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2009, Spring 2014, Spring 2015
    Course Description:  19th-century German songs engage musical structures to represent literary ideas of poetry.  What are the text-music relationships of the poetry and the music of Lieder?  What makes up the history, primary composers, most important repertoire, and continuing tradition into the 20th century of the German Lieder?  Students will analyze songs for the meaning and structure of lyrics, the musical structure, and propose correspondences between the poem and the music.  Students will compose a song in the style of a 19th-century German Lied.
  • Counts as:  PSY 3323 or PSY 4391*
    Professor(s):  H. Ginsburg
    Semester(s) Offered:  *Spring 2009, *Fall 2010, Spring 2012, Spring 2014, Fall 2016
    Course Description: Students will examine Darwin’s theories of natural and sexual selection applied to animal/human behavior emotion and cognition. Perspectives from modern, anthropology, ethology and psychology are incorporated, examining theories and empirical data related to the evolution of human behavior.

  • Counts as: French 2310, 2320 or advanced French
    Professor(s): C. Martin, Modern Languages.  Course location is in Rennes, France with optional week in Paris
    Semester(s) Offered: Summer 2009, 2010, 2014
    Course Description: This total immersion program in French language and culture will provide students with a comprehensive approach and authentic language environment to continue the development of proficiency in French. Students will also achieve greater cultural understanding by becoming immediately and personally involved with different values inherent in a foreign culture. 

  • Counts as:  Advanced Biology 
    Professor(s): W. Rast
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2015
    Course Description: An interdisciplinary introduction to the interdependence between humans and their natural environment, emphasizing linkages between human activities and their impacts on environmental resources and sustainability, including the ecosystem goods and services provided by a healthy environment.
  • Counts as: SOWK 3339 or counts toward the Diversity Studies Minor
    Professor(s): R. Travis
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2012
    Course Description: Hip-Hop Culture is examined within the context of human development over the life course. Cultural dynamics are viewed alongside the social and political history of the United States. Through the lens of Hip-Hop, students will use skills in reflection, discussion, and creative expression to develop strategies for personal growth and development.
  • Counts as: SOWK 3339 or counts toward the Diversity Studies Minor
    Professor(s): Hawkins, Catherine
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2012
    Course Description: This course is an introduction to LGBT Studies, combining three academic disciplines: social, political, and historical; drama and fine arts; and English and queer theory. These disciplines will be integrated throughout the semester to assist students in developing a perspective of local, national, and global LGBT themes and issues. In this course, students will analyze the contributions and marginalization of LGBT people and their straight allies throughout history, particularly in the more recent sexual and gender rights movement. Students will also conduct and present scholarly research of a topic of their interest within LGBT Studies to gain a deeper understanding of the subject.

  • Counts as: ENG 1320 or ENG 3311
    Professor(s): L. Ellis-Lai
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015
    Course Description: Portraiture is a cross-genre research methodology in which writers study a person, a group of people, an institution, or a concept. Students will create carefully researched portraits that integrate personal narrative, interviews, and academic research. Portraiture values students’ lived experiences and has roots in anthropology, sociology, journalism, and creative nonfiction. The course provides an opportunity for students to learn how to integrate their lived experiences and personal perspectives with the published work of advanced scholars in various disciplines. Students will reflect on the nature of knowledge as it exists both within and outside of academia. Offered as HON 2301B as of Fall 2016.
  • Counts as: HIST1320 or upper division HIST C
    Professor(s): J. Mellard
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2012
    Course Description: Amongst the genres of American popular music, styles heavily associated with the U.S. South tend to predominate, and the history of eac seems to be entangled with that region's contentious racial history. This course will engage the history of musical production and performance in the South while also examining the hagiography of the South, its music, and its people.
  • Counts as: Advanced Theater or may count as advanced English Group D
    Professor(s): J. Hood, J. Morille
    Semester(s) Offered:  Fall 2016, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2016
    Course Description: This course develops the basic professional techniques and skills used in writing for the writing and theatrical stage. Students analyze scripts and perform practical exercises in story and character development, study dramatic play and structure, and develop a full-length dramatic play. Weekly readings and critiques assist writers in refining their scripts.
  • Counts as: Adv Theatre, Adv. English Group D, or counts toward the Minor in Media Studies
    Crosslisted with TH 3358 Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, and Fall 2014
    Professor(s): J. Hood, J. Morille
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Spring 2017
    Course Description: Develop basic professional techniques and skills used in writing for the screen. Analyze contemporary scripts, perform practical exercises in story and character development, study screenplay structure and format, and develop a full-length screenplay. The seminar and workshop format provide opportunities for weekly readings and critiques to assist writers in refining their scripts.

  • Counts as: Adv Philosophy or Adv English Group C or counts toward the Religious Studies Minor
    Professor(s): R. Raphael
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2010
    Course Description: Using religious studies scholarship on myth, the course surveys creation mythologies from around the world. Native American, African, Near Eastern (including Biblical), Greco-Roman, Old European, and Asian myths will be included. Cosmological myths will then be compared to scientific cosmology and the current model(s) of the Universe’s origin. 
  • Counts as: MC 4301 or advanced Political Science

    Professor(s): G. Martinez
    Semester(s) Offered:  Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018
    Course Description: This course focuses on U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to the First Amendment and the five rights of religion, speech, press assembly, and petition.  By examining how the high court has interpreted the First Amendment, students will learn about the government’s sometimes wavering commitment to our nation’s most cherished rights.
  • Counts as: Sophomore Literature, advanced Theatre, or advanced English Group D

    Professor(s): J. Hood
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Summer 2014, Spring 2015
    Course Description: This course examines the art and culture of storytelling from ancient to contemporary times.  Students read and analyze stories from oral and written traditions and develop skills in creating and applying storytelling in social, business, political, and entertainment environments.
  • Counts as: Advanced Theatre or English 3354

    Professor(s):  J. Hood
    Semester(s) offered: Summer 2010
    Course Description: This new collaborative course melds the study of dramatic literature with the practicalities of presenting Shakespeare's earlier plays (1590 – 1600). Professor John Hood focuses on presentation, performance, and production; in the parallel English 3354 Earlier Shakespeare course, Professor Dan Lochman focuses on literary and critical values.

    Students in both courses will attend the same lecture sessions and study the same resources, and will form collaborative teams to adapt and stage presentations of three early plays by Shakespeare: The Taming of the Shrew, Richard III, and The Merchant of Venice. Students in this Honors course will concentrate on adaptation, direction, staging, and production using an ensemble of performers from both courses.

  • Counts as: Advanced Theatre or ENG 4355
    Professor(s): J. Hood
    Semester(s) Offered: Summer II 2011; Summer I 2012; Summer II 2015

    Course Description: This seminar/workshop series examines the transformation of literature into performance using three examples from Shakespeare's later plays.  Through close reading and analysis, students develop a critical understanding of literary, sociological, and cultural attributes of written works, and then develop approaches to transforming and presenting the works into dramatic performances.

  • Counts as: International Studies Elective or POSI 4322
    Professor(s): D. Rahm
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015, Fall 2016
    Course Description: How do we find ways for the world's growing population to live sustainability? This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to U.S. policy for energy, the environment, and sustainability. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the laws, regulations, and treaties that oversee air and water pollution, solid waste, hazardous waste, energy use, natural resources, climate change, and global governance for energy, environment, and sustainability.
  • Counts as: Advanced Business Elective or counts toward the minor in Leadership Studies

    Professor(s): M. Dickinson
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016
    Course Description: Can’t make a decision? Need tools to evaluate alternatives? Want help reaching group decisions? Facing a high future-impact decision? (What college student isn’t?) How can you make ‘good’ decisions? This course uses hands-on case studies to help students gain valuable tools and techniques for these and other types of decisions.

  • Counts as: Advanced HIST elective, Advanced Criminal Justice elective, POSI 3395, POSI 4330-Group II, POSI 4304-Group III, POSI 4326-Group V, or International Studies elective

    Professor(s): J. Pliley
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2015
    Course Description: What is the history of the anti-white slavery movement of the late nineteenth century and how has that history affected the migration of sex workers across the globe? How has that history affected the modern day anti-sex trafficking movement?  What are the debates about sex work and sex trafficking of the twenty-first century?

  • Counts as: ENG 2330, 2340, or 3341
    Professor(s): R. Tally
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2013
    Course Description: This is a course on world literature that looks specifically at otherworldly literature, or what China Miéville has recently referred to as the fiction of estrangement, including works frequently categorized as utopia or dystopia, fantasy, and science fiction. Prerequisites: First-year writing (English 1310, 1320) or the equivalent. Texts include: Jameson, Archaeologies of the Future; Bellamy, Looking Backward, 2000–1887 ; Zamyatin, We; Orwell, Animal Farm; Tolkien, The Hobbit; Vonnegut, Cat’s Cradle; Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy; and Collins, The Hunger Games. 

  • Counts as: ANTH 3309 or ENG 3307, 3327, 3328, 3329, or 3340
    Professor(s): A. Winchell
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2017
    Course Description: "Anyone who tries to make a distinction between education and entertainment doesn't know the first thing about either." - Marshal McLuhan
    This course will examine how stories are crafted to fit new interactive media, how these new stories resemble traditional stories from the literary canon, and what these unorthodox plots, characters, and games reveal about the players and video game writers.

  • Counts as: Advanced Horticulture elective
    Professor(s): A. LeDuc
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018
    Course Description: This course introduces students to urban landscape and the regional environment and the role the two play in the quality of life. Students will look at people-plant interactions as they relate to art, science, practice, and commercial products and services of Horticulture, and the impact that land use decisions have on the sustainability of the environment.

  • Counts as: HIST 1320 or advanced History elective
    Professor(s): J. Mellard.
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2014
    Course Description: This course revisits the reputation of a decade in which it seemed like nothing happened. To the contrary, many recent commentators have claimed the Seventies as a pivotal historical moment. We will engage questions regarding why this is so, and how an understanding of the 1970's helps us to orient ourselves in the contemporary political, economic, and cultural milieu.

  • Counts as: Advanced Geography elective
    Professor(s): L. Hammon
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2015
    Course Description: This course is a systematic approach to the multifaceted aspects of the physical and human geography of the African continent.  It will include an examination of the effects of globalization on changing environmental, cultural, economic, urban, and political landscapes exposing the student to a variety of contemporary ideas, theories, and concepts in African geography, and their applicability to “real world” situations.

  • Counts as: Advanced Geography elective
    Professor(s): J. Vaughan
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2015
    Course Description: This course explores themes in urban studies using full-length films and selected readings.  Students will study the geo-political, economic, and socio-cultural dimensions of cities and urban society.  Using cinema as a pedagogical tool immerses students in the urban experience more than traditional instructional methods, resulting in a richer and more impactful understanding of the subject. 

  • Counts as: ENG 3322, 3323, 3340, 3341, or International Studies Elective
    Professor(s): C. Cassells
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2014
    Course Description: Students will gain a vibrant glimpse into memoir, novels, poetry, plays, and short stories enhanced with photography, film, and music, that affirm Barcelona as a place of literary imagination and vitality.

  • Counts as: HIST 2320, 3342, 3343, or International Studies Elective
    Professor(s): R. Haas
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2015
    Course Description: Is America an "exceptional" country? Does it have a special role to play in world affairs? The hotly debated theory of "American exceptionalism" holds that the American people and the American polity are fundamentally "different," and that this distinctiveness, furthermore, is related to America's unique status as a "city upon a hill." Proponents of American exceptionalism maintain that its vision and ideals continue to inspire the best in our national traditions. To most of the rest of the world, however, the theory of “American exceptionalism” is not only egocentric and self-serving, but downright dangerous.  Since 9/11 and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, there seems to be a steady rise in European and global anti-Americanism, both in its most virulent form—terrorism—and in its more common and widespread expressions.  In this interdisciplinary course in the history of ideas, we will investigate the history of both “American Exceptionalism” and “Anti-Americanism” from the European colonization of the New World up to the present in order to gain a deeper understanding of America’s position in the world and the love-hate relationship between America and the rest.

  • Counts as: Honors
    Professor(s): M. DiMauro-Jackson
    Semester(s) Offered: Summer 2015
    Course Description: This study abroad course will cultivate student knowledge of the similarities and differences among international cultures, values, traditions, beliefs, and customs. Discussions and written assignments will provide opportunities to understand the cultural achievements and human conditions of the specific target country. Field trips will provide cultural components to add to the discussion and written assignments.

  • Counts as: Advanced History Group A or International Studies Elective: Inter-American Focus
    Professor(s): M. Miller
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2015
    Course Description: This seminar will investigate the landscape of state and culture in the Republic of Mexico in the 20th Century.  This investigation will explore the creators, as well as the political supporters and detractors, of popular culture as well as the fine arts, plastic arts, dance and theatre arts, poetry, music, literature, photography, the entire cultural landscape of the Republic of Mexico in the 20th Century.

  • Counts as: Advanced Business Elective
    Professor(s): B. Poston
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2015
    Course Description: This course is designed to elevate the performance of leaders. Students are challenged to develop their potential in seminar-style sessions covering leadership definitions, theory, frameworks, and the global application of skills. Students explore their behaviors, motivations, values, influences, and character in an effort to increase self-awareness and to think critically.

  • Counts as: POSI Group 1 or Group II upper-level course
    Professor(s): P. Burka
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2015
    Course Description: Using classic texts and works from literature and film, and current event videos, this course provides students with a foundation for understanding the intersection of politics and ethics and for achieving an understanding of how politics works. (Note, Paul Burka, the instructor, is the senior executive editor for Texas Monthly.)

  • Counts as: ANTH 3360

    Professor: Dr. R. Warms

    Semester offered: Spring 2015

    Description: Reviews central issues in economic anthropology, using both case studies and theoretical writings. Analyzes production, exchange, distribution, consumption, property, economic surplus, inheritance, and types of economic structure. Materials will cover hunter-gatherer societies, simple agricultural societies, pre-capitalist complex state societies, and issues of development in non-industrialized countries.

  • Counts as:  ENG 3315
    Professor(s):  A. Winchell
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2018
    Course Description: This course will teach students to write for video games based on techniques learned from observation and study. The course focuses on creativity and flexibility, two traits essential to game writing, and students will develop a marketable design document for an original video game working in design teams.

     

  • Counts as:  ENG 3311 or 3340
    Professor(s):  D. McCabe
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017
    Course Description: What has the act of walking meant historically and what does it mean today? What has been written about the experience of walking? What insights can walking with reflection bring? Students will explore these questions through readings in literature, history, and philosophy, and through art and the act of walking.    

  • Counts as:  SOCI 3375L; Consumption or any advanced POSI - Group II
    Professor(s): B. Price
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2017
    Course Description: Hostility to science, experts, and “book learning” is a common impulse that shapes contemporary American culture and politics. In this course, we will explore how anti-intellectualism promotes notions about media bias, encourages belief in implausible conspiracies, and spurs hyperpolarized politics, among other topics.

  • Counts as:  Advanced Religion, advanced Philosophy, International Studies/International Relations, or counts toward the Medieval/Renaissance Studies minor
    Professor(s): J. Laycock
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2017
    Course Description: People have believed in demons throughout Western civilization and continue to, despite advances in science and medicine.  This course explores the social significance of demonology.  What are the historical, psychological, political, and economic consequences of believing in demons? To explore such questions, students will examine demonology across cultures and employ a variety of disciplinary approaches.

  • Counts as: FR 4390, SPAN 4390, GER 4390, or LING 4390
    Professor(s):  P. Golato
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2017
    Course Description: Readings and discussions will concern human language’s evolution, its representation in the mind/brain, and its learning by native and non-native speakers.  Topics will include:  evidence for language in other species including homo neanderthalensis; whether human language is innately specified; and similarities and differences between first and second language acquisition.

  • Counts as: Advanced Psychology Elective

    Professor: N. Ceballos

    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2016

    Description: In this course, we will identify and discuss psychological concepts in popular films from a variety of genres. We will address issues of conformity, consciousness, motivation, addiction and psychological disorders. The approach to the material will be interdisciplinary in nature with a special focus on modern behavioral neuroscience.

  • Counts as: ENG 3341 or counts toward the Minor in Religious Studies

    Professor: R. Raphael

    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2016

    Description: The course surveys the Celtic and Christian sources of grail legends, the major medieval grail quests, and post-medieval appropriation of the grail quest. Primary sources shall be examined through the methods of literary criticism, anthropology, and religious studies.

  • Counts as: Advanced Anthropology elective

    Professor: A. Agwuele

    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2016

    Description: This course is an introductory overview of human speech sounds. It describes speech anatomy and pays particular attention to the description of the acoustic and articulatory properties of speech as it occurs in real time. Students will study articulatory, acoustic, and auditory phonetics.

  • Counts as: Advanced European History or International Studies: European Focus
    Professor: R. Haas
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2016
    Course Description: To be a “modern” self is to live a life of paradox and contradiction: to be torn between a passion for creation and innovation and a profound wariness of the future, between a restless search for individuality and a nostalgia for the intimate communities of the past.  To be a “modern” self is to live in a world in which, as Marx and Engels wrote, “all that is solid melts into air,” and in which the struggle to preserve something authentic against the forces of alienation is never assured.   In this course we will investigate the origins of modern alienation in the intellectual and cultural revolutions of the 18th and 19th centuries and trace the search for authenticity through the literature, philosophy, and art of Europe and the United States.  From romanticism and transcendentalism to surrealism and existentialism, we will explore how some of the Western tradition's most influential intellectuals and artists such Friedrich Nietzsche, Charles Baudelaire, and Sigmund Freud dissected the “modern condition” and dreamed of rising above it.

  • Counts as: ENG 3340 or SPAN 4390

    Professor: C. Wall

    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2016

    Description: This course offers an inter-American multidisciplinary approach to Hispanic and Latino writers and artists in New York City from the late nineteenth century to the present.  Topics include exile, migration, identity, bilingualism, and civil rights through a variety of literary genres, artistic forms, cultural organizations, and academic disciplines.

  • Counts as: Advanced Psychology elective

    Professor(s): J. Lasser

    Semester Offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2018

    Description: This course introduces the key ethical concerns related to human subject research. Students will analyze research projects in which scholars place individuals at risk in the interest of reaping some benefit to those individuals and/or society. A case-study approach will actively engage students in ethical decision-making.

  • Counts as: MU 3370, ART 3370 & DANCE 3370

    Professor(s): S. Smith

    Semester Offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2018

    Description: Examine multidisciplinary concepts applied within makerspaces and complete hands-on design projects using beginner-level do-it-yourself techniques, including “upcycling” recyclable materials, 2D subtractive manufacturing (i.e. CNC machines that trim acrylic, cardboard, vinyl), 3D additive manufacturing (i.e. 3D modeling, printing), textiles (i.e. embroidery, sewing), and electrical circuits (i.e. micro-controllers, sensors).

  • *Also listed as HON 2305C

    Counts as: Creative Arts Code 050 or may be taken for an Advanced Art History elective
    Professor: K. Moore
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2016
    Day/Time: MW 5:00 - 6:20PM
    Course Description: This course will challenge the traditional account of the development of Italian Renaissance art by exploring connections to Islamic culture of the surrounding Mediterranean world.  Students will be introduced to visual analysis and interdisciplinary research techniques by which art and architecture can be used as documents in the interpretation of history.

  • Counts as: International Studies elective, counts toward the Diversity Minor, or advanced Geography elective with special approval
    Professor: P. Schiaffini
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2016
    Course Description: This course attempts to shed light on the political, religious, economic, environmental and cultural situation of modern Tibet, by reading the latest works by Tibetan, Chinese and Western scholars, and by analyzing and questioning propaganda and stereotypes. Besides the academic readings, students will be exposed to a wide variety of resources that speak eloquently about modern Tibet: Modern Tibetan literature, art, pop music and film, as well as a chance to hear some first-hand accounts by class guests.

  • Counts as: Advanced Curriculum & Instruction elective
    Crosslisted with CI5388 during Fall 2016
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2016
    Professor: C. Pimentel
    Course Description: This course examines sociopolitical aspects of language in local, national, and global contexts. Students learn about language ideologies and gain a profound understanding for how languages and language practices are intricately tied to the racial and economic power relations embedded in schools and society. This class is stacked with C & I 5388.

  • Counts as: POSI 4304

    Professor(s): J. Harrington

    Semester Offered: Spring 2017

    Description: This course explores major civil liberties themes in depth, both historical and contemporary, such as religious free exercise, free speech and press, criminal procedure, capital punishment, right to privacy, equal protection (race and gender), due process, political participation, and disabilities rights.

  • Counts as: ANTHR 3397V
    Crosslisted with ANTH 3376V during Spring 2017.
    Semester(s) Taught: Spring 2017
    Professor(s): R. Warms
    Course Description: The class explores anthropological perspectives on peace and violence.  It focuses on understanding violent practices within both traditional and current day societies including everyday violence and warfare.  It explores the contributions of social structure, gender, religion, race, and ethnicity to violence.  It examines efforts to build peace and reconciliation.

  • Counts as: PSY 3338

    Professor: M. Czyzewska

    Semester Offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2018

    Course Description: The course examines clinical, legal and psychosocial conditions of adults who, due to mental illness, developmental impairments, brain injuries or aging, are declared “incapacitated” and have court-appointed guardians. Students will serve as probate court representatives (i.e., Court Visitors) who inspect living conditions/services for individuals under court-ordered guardianships (service learning component). Instructor approval required.

    Instructor Approval Required.

  • Counts as: Advanced International Studies elective or counts towards the minor in Diversity Studies; substitutes for HIST 4343 "History of Modern China"
    Professor: P. Schiaffini
    Semester Offered: Spring 2018
    Course Description: This course offers an overview of the main political developments in contemporary China through the cultural production of Chinese writers and filmmakers who, following the tradition of the Chinese literati of imperial times, became main characters in the modern Chinese political scene. A combination of modern China related readings in the fields of political science, literature, and cultural studies, as well as films and documentaries, will inform in-class discussions on China’s modern political history, state control and popular protest, the development of civil society, social and gender inequalities, China-Taiwan and China-Hong Kong relations, and ethnic policies.

  • Counts as: ENG 3336

    Professor(s): Dr. Flore Chevaillier

    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2018

    Description: Today, the human body interrelates with ideas of identity, society, and fashion; it has become something that can be written and read. In this class, we will focus on writings and artifacts about the body’s cultural significance. At the end of the semester, we will attempt to define (or re-define) what our bodies mean to us and to society. In the process, you will perfect your skills of careful reading, sound researching, and convincing arguing.

     

     

  • Counts as: SOCI 3324 or counts as a Business Advanced Elective
    Professor: B. Price
    Semester Offered: Spring 2018
    Course Description: Economic changes such as continued workplace automation and markedly slower growth imply big changes in social stratification in coming years. This course explores work and stratification in light of the “jobless economy” thesis, recent proposals for a universal basic income, and related likely cultural consequences.

  • Counts as: ANTH 3327
    Professor: R. Warms
    Semester Offered: Spring 2018
    Course Description: This course provides students with current and historical approaches to the anthropology of religion with a particular emphasis on fundamentalism.  It focuses on the development of religious fundamentalism in different cultural contexts, geopolitical situations, and religious traditions. 

  • Counts as: Advanced BIO elective, advanced MATH elective or advanced Computer Science elective
    Professor: S. Sun
    Time: TR 11:00-12:20
    Course Description: This is an interdisciplinary course with a focus on the analysis of genetics and bioinformatics data. This course will cover basic genetics, statistics, programming, and cutting-edge research topics on statistical genetics and bioinformatics. Students will have hands-on experience of analyzing different types of genetic and bioinformatic data.

  • Counts as: ENG 3336
    Professor: C. Parks
    Semester Offered: Spring 2018
    Course Description: This course is a multidisciplinary study of the cultural, historical, and ecological significance of the night as revealed in poetry, fiction, and drama. The semester will begin with a historical study of the night pre-electricity, and will end with a consideration of the endangered nights of our post-electrical present and future.

  • Counts as: Advanced Philosophy
    Professor: A. Cross
    Semester Offered: Spring 2018
    Course Description: Increasingly, our lives are lived online: we communicate, learn, play, and love on the internet. In this course, we investigate the epistemological, ethical, and cultural implications of this shift. Topics discussed include: fake news and internet hoaxes; the digital self; online relationships and “social” media; online privacy; and the aesthetics and ethics of online gaming and internet memes.

  • Counts as: ANTH 4309
    Professor: E. Brunson
    Semester Offered: Spring 2018
    Course Description: This course explores how the human body, bodily functions, and the practice of medicine and healing are situated and contextualized within cultural frameworks. While medical anthropology is broadly concerned with issues of health and healing on a global scale, most of the material covered in this course will focus on issues specific to the United States.

  • Counts as: GEO 4393D
    Professor: C. Myles
    Semester Offered: Spring 2018
    Course Description: This course will critically evaluate local and global food systems, considering the implications of varying forms of production and consumption and exploring topics related to sociocultural, economic, and environmental landscape change, the role of agriculture in both rural and urban places, and sustainability writ large.

  • Counts as: TH 4330X
    Professor: J. Morille
    Semester Offered: Spring 2018
    Course Description: Dramatic Adaptation is a writing course where students will be adapting non-dramatic works into stage plays. The course will begin with an introduction of the dramatic form, with regards to adaptation, in both principles and structure. Students will then create and write their own adaptations for the stage.

  • Counts as: TBD
    Professor(s): TBD
    Semester(s) Offered: TBD
    Course Description: This course will center on identifying community needs and working with non-profit and/or government institutions in response to those needs. Courses will combine community service with academic instruction and will focus on critical, reflective thinking and personal and social responsibility. 

  • Counts as: Upper-level Philosophy; PS 3313 "Contemporary Political Theory"
    Professor(s): V. Baltzly
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2018
    Course Description: What are an individual’s moral obligations to their community, nation, and world? How do governments and economic systems shape these obligations? Are capitalism and socialism really opposites? This course investigates these questions, and others, through the interdisciplinary study of “PPE,” an emerging field that draws from philosophy, politics, and economics.

  • Counts as: QMST 2333 "Business Statistics"; MATH 2328 "Elementary Statistics"
    Professor(s): L. Fulton
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2019
    Course Description: This course uses the scaffolding of gambling and sports betting to engage students in applied probability and statistical modeling. The course covers both descriptive and inferential methods. Topics include measures of central tendency, dispersion, and shape; probability and probability distributions; sampling distributions; estimation, hypothesis testing, linear models, and non-parametric analysis.

  • Counts as: ANTH 3376Z "Language & the Body"
    Professor(s): N. Taylor
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2019
    Course Description: Linguistic anthropologists believe that language not only reflects but also shapes and creates our social worlds. This class will focus on how language shapes our embodied identities and our deeply held beliefs through exploration of linguistic, cultural, and medical anthropological research and that of related social sciences.

  • Counts as: Honors
    Professor(s): H. Galloway
    Semester(s) Offered: Fall 2010
    Course Description: This course addresses current issues in the natural sciences, particularly those that have significance for today. This course includes a laboratory or fieldwork component. Also see HON 2380H and HON 2303C.

  • Counts as: PHYS 1310 and 1110
    Professor(s): E. Close; H. Galloway
    Semester(s) Offered: Spring 2013, Summer 2014, Fall 2014
    Course Description: This course will focus on developing a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in physical science and how these concepts relate to making sense of our every-day experience. This studio-style course includes both physics concepts and research findings on physics teaching and learning. This course will be fulfilling for all but is especially ideal for those interested in teaching K-8. Also offered as HON 2380I or HON 2303A.

  • Counts as: Advanced elective
    Professor(s):  H. Galloway; P. Tschirhart
    Semester(s) Offered:  Every Fall and Spring
    Course Description:  This course provides the opportunity to focus on research and learn research techniques appropriate for an honors thesis. This course provides the foundation to develop a realistic project, find a supportive thesis supervisor, build a bibliography and outline, and complete the review of literature. Most students who take HON 4390A do so prior to taking HON 4390B during their junior or senior year.

  • Counts as: Advanced elective
    Professor(s): H. Galloway, R. Haas
    Offered: Every Semester
    Course Description:  Students enrolled in HON 4390B work with the guidance of their supervising professor to complete their honors thesis. In addition, thesis students present their thesis project at the Honors thesis forum or undergraduate research conference.

  • Semester(s) Offered: Every semester
    Course Description: This course allows students to study selected materials under the direct supervision of a professor for honors credit. The course meeting days, times, and substitutions are arranged by the professor and honors student.
    To enroll in an independent study course, a student must meet with Dr. Ron Haas, prior to enrolling in HON4391. You can download the HON4391 Course Agreement. To make an appointment, please email honors@txstate.edu.