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Cost:
Free
Contact:
Jessica Pliley | pliley@txstate.edu
Campus Sponsor:
Department of History

German American feminist Mathilde Franziska Anneke and Yankee abolitionist Mary Booth enjoyed an intense, cohabiting relationship from 1859 to 1865. What’s more, they wrote about it. Although Anneke and Booth’s romantic friendship was unique, it offers a window into a type of bond that found social sanction in the nineteenth century. Their correspondence covers how they supported and inspired each other while Booth’s husband faced trial for rape, they moved with three of their children from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Zurich, Switzerland, they published abolitionist fiction, and they saw Booth’s health decline precipitously. This presentation argues for a queer interpretation of romantic friendship that resists the categories of lesbian or straight, sexual or platonic. Ultimately, it suggests that this form of relationship holds lessons for our own times.

Advanced Registration Required

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The Center for the Study of the Southwest

Location:
Online and in Person | TMH 101
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Tammy Gonzales | tammyg@txstate.edu
Campus Sponsor:
The Center for the Study of the Southwest
The authors of Forget the Alamo: the Rise and Fall of an American myth put together a vivid and skilled picture of the way a public history gets made in Texas, using the subsequent chroniclers of the 1836 siege of the Alamo as their template. By tracking the deliberate steps people have re-told the story of ‘the Alamo’ to fit their narrative ideals, Bryan Burrough, Chris Tomlinson and Jason Stanford have demonstrated the many complicated ways the myth of the Alamo has been created and re-crafted to take up political space in Texas, the nation and the world. 

Advanced Registration Required | www.txstate.edu…
Click here for more information
more about event
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Jessica Pliley | pliley@txstate.edu
Campus Sponsor:
Department of History

German American feminist Mathilde Franziska Anneke and Yankee abolitionist Mary Booth enjoyed an intense, cohabiting relationship from 1859 to 1865. What’s more, they wrote about it. Although Anneke and Booth’s romantic friendship was unique, it offers a window into a type of bond that found social sanction in the nineteenth century. Their correspondence covers how they supported and inspired each other while Booth’s husband faced trial for rape, they moved with three of their children from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Zurich, Switzerland, they published abolitionist fiction, and they saw Booth’s health decline precipitously. This presentation argues for a queer interpretation of romantic friendship that resists the categories of lesbian or straight, sexual or platonic. Ultimately, it suggests that this form of relationship holds lessons for our own times.

Advanced Registration Required

Click here for more information
more about event
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Tammy Gonzales | tammyg@txstate.edu
Campus Sponsor:
Center for the Study of the Southwest
Jenna Cooper (Austin History Center) and Elizabeth Stauber (Hogg Foundation for Mental Health) are part of the Neurodiversity Working Group in the Society of American Archivists tasked with developing recommendations for meaningful ways to preserve the Austin State Hospital’s history and to share how the campus and treatment for mental illness have evolved since 1856.  In this presentation, Cooper and Stauber speak on their experiences modeling interventions in their work as archivists that are more gender, race and neurodiverse inclusive.

Event will be held online via Zoom and live in Brazos Hall.

Advanced Registration Required | www.txstate.edu…
Click here for more information
more about event

Location:
Online via Zoom and in person at Brazos Hall
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Tammy Gonzales | tammyg@txstate.edu
Campus Sponsor:
The Center for the Study of the Southwest
Beginning in the 1920s, after the Mexican Revolution, workers for the Missouri-Pacific railroad started playing competitive softball, using their access to the rails to set up a traveling circuit and league.  Working with the memories and material culture of third and fourth generation members of this traveling fast-pitch softball community, American Studies specialist Ben Chappell has crafted a compelling historical ethnography – Mexican American Fastpitch: Identity at Play in Vernacular Sport.

Event will be held online via Zoom and in person at Brazos hall

Advanced Registration Required | www.txstate.edu…
Click here for more information
more about event

Location:
Online via Zoom and in person in Brazos Hall
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Tammy Gonzales | tammyg@txstate.edu
Campus Sponsor:
Center for the Study of the Southwest

In the midst of this COVID pandemic, another set of communities have also been traumatized by a rise in overdoses and opioid related deaths.  Amy Sullivan, a medical humanities and oral history specialist, has focused on the family and care-giving connections that help people with addiction issues persist.  Through extended interviews and case-studies with staff, family and people with addiction issues, Sullivan identifies an alternate lived morality in these care networks, one focused on harm reduction and damage mitigation, and slowly becoming a practice in rehab, parenting and care-giving efforts.  Her book, Opioid Reckoning: Love, Loss and Redemption in the Rehab State brings these difficult lives, their policy connections and her carefully crafted oral histories into our public sphere.

Event will be online via Zoom and in person in Brazos Hall.
Advanced Registration Required | www.txstate.edu…

Click here for more information
more about event