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Cost:
Free
Contact:
Tammy Gonzales | tammyg@txstate.edu
Campus Sponsor:
Center for the Study of the Southwest
In 1970, when the Supreme Court mandated the de-segregation of Austin’s public schools, Austin’s organized black communities faced a radically different political landscape.  Roxanne Evans’ award-winning coverage examined the decisions to close integrated Black majority high schools, the experience of busing, local Black mobilization for school boards and the renewed challenges in the 80s and 90s.  Here, Roxanne Evans explores the ways these movements’ victories and challenges still shape local politics in Travis County.

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History Department

Cost:
Free
Contact:
Caroline Ritter | ritter@txstate.edu
Campus Sponsor:
The Department of History
In the 1930s, British colonial officials introduced drama performances, broadcasting services, and publication bureaus into Africa under the rubric of colonial development. This project proved remarkably resilient: well after the end of Britain’s imperial rule, many of its cultural institutions remained in place.  Imperial Encore (University of California Press, 2021) traces British drama, broadcasting, and publishing in Africa between the 1930s and the 1980s—the half century spanning the end of British colonial rule and the outset of African national rule. Caroline Ritter shows how three major cultural institutions—the British Council, the BBC, and Oxford University Press—integrated their work with British imperial aims, and continued this project well after the end of formal British rule. Tracing these institutions and the media they produced through the tumultuous period of decolonization and its aftermath, Ritter offers the first account of the global footprint of British cultural imperialism.

Caroline Ritter is Assistant Professor of History at Texas State University. She is a historian of Modern Imperial Britain, with particular interests in decolonization, development, and media in Africa.

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Cost:
Free
Contact:
Caroline Ritter | ritter@txstate.edu
Campus Sponsor:
The Department of History
In colonial Boston and Newport, personal credit relationships were a cornerstone of economic networks. As the pace of market exchange quickened, became ever more central to enforcing financial obligations. At the same time, seafaring and military service drew men away from home, some never to return. These transitions forced New Englanders to evaluate a pressing question: Who would establish and manage consequential financial relationships?

In To Her Credit (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2021), Sara T. Damiano uncovers free women's centrality to the interrelated worlds of eighteenth-century finance and law. Focusing on everyday life in Boston, Massachusetts, and Newport, Rhode Island—two of the busiest port cities of this period—Damiano argues that colonial women's skilled labor actively facilitated the growth of Atlantic ports and their legal systems. Mining vast troves of court records, Damiano reveals that married and unmarried women of all social classes forged new paths through the complexities of credit and debt, stabilizing credit networks amid demographic and economic turmoil.

Sara T. Damiano is Assistant Professor of History at Texas State University. She is a historian of women and gender in early North America, with interests in economic history and legal history.

Ellen Hartigan-O’Connor is Associate Professor of History and Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at University of California, Davis. She is the author of The Ties that Buy: Women and Commerce in Revolutionary America and co-editor of The Oxford Handbook of American Women's and Gender History.

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