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Construction Science and Management

Public Information

The Construction Science and Management (CSM) Program, which is part of the Engineering Technology Department at Texas State University, is accredited through the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE). As part of the accreditation process to keep the public informed, helpful information is provided on the undergraduate program, accreditation and the Program’s assessment process.

The CSM Program had its beginning in 1984 and since then has grown to over 500 majors and 10 fulltime Faculty members. Students in the program can attend the two Construction Career Fairs while searching for internships, summer employment or fulltime careers in the Construction Industry. Employment opportunities are currently strong with a vast majority of our students find a position in the Construction Industry either before or shortly after graduation and salaries average close to sixty thousand dollars per year. The Program also seeks input from its Construction Advisory Board, to insure the degree is providing the educational background required by Industry.

Following are informational topics that students, parents, Industry, and the general public will find useful in learning more about the Construction Science and Management Program at Texas State University.

CSM Undergraduate Program

  • CSM Program’s History
  • Admission into the CSM Program
  • Curriculum
  • Mission Statement, Program Goals and Student Learning Outcomes
  • Enrollment Trends
  • Construction and Concrete Industry Career Fairs
  • Job Placement Record
  • Construction Industry Placement by Sectors
  • Degrees Awarded by Semester
  • Student Achievements – Scholarships
  • Alumni Survey Results
  • Student Awards

Construction Science and Management Program History

The CSM Program had its beginnings in 1984 and has gone through many changes over the years. In 2006, the Construction Advisory Board (CAB) was created and consisted of representatives from the Construction Industry, whom provide guidance to the program. Soon after its creation one of their major goals was to work with the CSM Faculty to obtain accreditation through the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE), which happened in 2013. At that time, the Program was only the third in the state and the seventieth in the nation to receive this accreditation. Today, the Degree has grown to 539 majors (Fall 2017) and nine dedicated Faculty, with our first “Professor of Practice” joining the faculty in the Fall of 2017, raising the number of CSM Faculty to 10. Also, because of the high demand for our graduates, two specific Construction and Concrete Industry Career Fairs are held in the Fall and Spring semesters, which attract over 60 employers. Students attend these Job Fairs seeking internships, summer jobs or fulltime employment. About 75% of graduating seniors find employment before they graduate and over 93% are employed within 6 months after graduation.

Admission into the CSM Program

All students who meet the entrance requirement for Texas State University, also meet the requirements to enter the CSM Major. The University has general admission standards for (A) students with no previous college work, (B) students with 1-29 transferable college hours, (C) students with 30 or more transferable hours, and (D) former Texas State students seeking readmission. Please see the University’s Admission website at: http://www.admissions.txstate.edu/, for all current admission requirements.  Also, the admission application is available electronically at: http://www.applytexas.org/ or prospective students can call (512) 245-2364.

Curriculum

The Construction Science and Management Degree consists of 120 prescribed hours (no electives), which also includes an 18 credit hour Business Administration Minor. A student who enters Texas State University with zero college credits should be able to complete the degree in four (4) years, if they enroll in an average of 15 credit hours each Fall and Spring semesters. All students entering the CSM Major are required to complete a 30 hour set of Pre-Construction courses, in which they must receive a “C” or higher grade and an overall average of a 2.5 GPA in these courses, before they can apply to become a “Full” Major and be allowed to enroll in the upper level CSM courses. Enforcement of this requirement provides the students with the necessary background to be successful in the advanced level Construction courses. Following is a list of Pre-Construction, Advanced CSM courses and Business Administration courses required for graduation. Also, students will need to complete a set of “General Education” courses required by all students in the State of Texas seeking an undergraduate degree. Note, the University Catalog should always be consulted for the exact list of required courses, because students entering under different catalog years, may have slightly different requirements.
(http://mycatalog.txstate.edu/undergraduate/science-engineering/technology/construction-science-management-minor-business-administration-bs/).

Pre-Construction (Courses)

  • Chemistry for Engineers
    • General Chemistry Lab
  • Architectural Design I – Construction Documents
  • Introduction to the Construction and Concrete Industry
  • Construction Materials and Process
  • Pre-Calculus
  • Elementary Statistics
  • General Physics I
    • General Physics I Lab
  • General Physics II
    • General Physics II Lab
  • Statics and Strength of Materials

 

 Advanced Construction Courses (Taken after Pre-Construction)

          CSM 2160 – Introduction to Construction Surveying

          CSM 2360 – Residential Construction Systems

          CSM 3360 – Structural Analysis

          CSM 3361 – Commercial Building Construction Systems

          CSM 3363 – Heavy, Civil, and Highway Construction Systems

          CSM 3366 – Soils and Foundation

          CSM 3367 – Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Systems

          CSM 4313 – Architecture Design II – Technology in Construction

          CSM 4360 – Senior Construction Management Capstone

          CSM 4361 – Construction Estimating

          CSM 4364 – Construction Project Management and Scheduling

          CSM 4368 – Environmentally Conscious Design and Construction

          CSM 4369 – Construction Contracts, Liability and Ethics

          TECH 2190 – Industrial Internship

          TECH 4380 – Industrial Safety

    

Business Administration Courses

  • Accounting in Organization and Society
  • Legal Environment of Business
  • Principles of Economics
  • Management of Organization
  • Principles of Marketing
  • E-Business

 

General Education

  • See University Catalog for exact listing of these courses

Mission Statement, Program Goals and Student Learning Outcomes

The Construction Science and Management Faculty slightly modified the Programs “Mission Statement” for 2017-2023 Strategic Plan. The Mission Statement is the statement of purpose for the CSM Program.

Mission Statement

The Mission of the Construction Science and Management Program is to achieve a nationally recognized, student-centered, industry-oriented, construction program that prepares graduates to become outstanding future leaders, well versed in relevant management practices, current construction techniques and methods used to construct the built environment.

To accomplish the “Mission Statement”, the Program faculty developed ten (10) Program Outcomes. These outcomes provide guidance in meeting the purpose described in the “Mission Statement”. Under each outcome are listed two (2) Student Learning Outcomes or SLO’s, provided by our accrediting body, the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE). These Program Outcomes and their associated SLO’s are evaluated periodically and needed changes are made.

Below are the ten (10) Program Outcomes and their Associated Student Learning Outcomes:

Outcome Number 1- Students will apply and understanding of construction fundamentals.

  • SLO 4- Create construction project cost estimates.
  • SLO 5- Create construction project schedules.

Outcome Number 2- Students will demonstrate an understanding of construction processes.

  • SLO 7- Analyze construction documents for planning and management of construction processes.
  • SLO 8- Analyze methods, materials, and equipment used to construct projects.

Outcome Number 3- Students will apply effective communication skills.

  • SLO 1- Create written communications appropriate to the construction discipline.
  • SLO 2- Create oral presentations appropriate to the construction discipline.

Outcome Number 4- Students will understand project risk management and project control processes.

  • SLO 13- Understand construction risk management.
  • SLO 16- Understand construction project control processes.

Outcome Number 5- Students will demonstrate strong leadership, management and teamwork skills

  • SLO 9- Apply construction management skills as an effective member of a multi-disciplinary team.
  • SLO 12- Understand different methods of project delivery and the roles and responsibilities of all constituencies involved in the design and construction process.

Outcome Number 6- Students will apply modern technology to solve construction related problems.

  • SLO 10- Apply electronic-based technology to manage the construction process.
  • SLO 11- Apply basic surveying techniques for construction layout and control.

Outcome Number 7- Students will recognize and apply high professional practices, sustainability and ethical standards.

  • SLO 6- Analyze professional decisions based on ethical principles.
  • SLO 18- Understand the basic principles of sustainable construction.

Outcome Number 8- Students will demonstrate an understanding and application of construction building systems.

  • SLO 19- Understand the basic principles of structural behavior.
  • SLO 20- Understand the basic principles of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems.

Outcome Number 9- Students will demonstrate an understanding of construction business fundamentals.

  • SLO 14- Understand construction accounting and cost control.
  • SLO 17- Understand the legal implications of contract, common, and regulatory law to manage a construction project.

Outcome Number 10- Students will demonstrate an understanding of safety plans and quality assurance protocols.

  • SLO 3- Create a construction project safety plan.
  • SLO 15- Understand construction quality assurance and control.

 

The Student Learning Outcomes are listed below in a hierarchical order following Bloom’s Taxonomy.

 

1

 Create written communications appropriate to the construction discipline.

2

 Create oral presentations appropriate to the construction discipline.

3

 Create a construction project safety plan.

4

 Create construction project cost estimates.

5

 Create construction project schedules.

6

 Analyze professional decisions based on ethical principles.

7

 Analyze construction documents for planning and management of construction processes.

8

 Analyze methods, materials, and equipment used to construct projects.

9

 Apply construction management skills as an effective member of a multi- disciplinary team.

10

 Apply electronic based technology to manage the construction process.

11

 Apply basic surveying techniques for construction layout and control.

12

 Understand different methods of project delivery and the roles and responsibilities of all constituencies involved in the design and construction process.

13

 Understand construction risk management.

14

 Understand construction accounting and cost control.

15

 Understand construction quality assurance and control.

16

 Understand construction project control processes.

17

 Understand the legal implications of contract, common, and regulatory law to manage a construction project.

18

 Understand the basic principles of sustainable construction.

19

 Understand the basic principles of structural behavior.

20

 Understand the basic principles of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems.

 

Bloom’s Taxonomy is commonly used in education to indicate the level of learning to take place, with “Create” being the highest and “Remembering” being the lowest level of learning. See list below:

Blooms Revised Taxonomy

Creating:

Students are producing new ideas or products that integrate the knowledge they have gained. When students are involved in creating new artifacts, they are actively engaged in the subject matter.

Evaluating:

Students are asked to judge an idea. This may involve predicting, experimenting, critiquing, or making an argument from evidence.

Analyzing:

Students begin to develop higher order thinking. They may be asked to compare and contrast or take concept and break it into parts to explore the relationships.

Applying:

Students begin to put the information they are learning into context. Here they are able to integrate ideas across multiple situations, or utilize the content in a new way.

Understanding:

Students demonstrate that they understand the content by explaining, summarizing, classifying, or translating the given information.

Remembering:

Students do very little with the information they are learning. They may be asked to recall, list, or name an idea or concept.

Enrollment Trends

The following table shows the enrollment trends in the growing CSM Program.

Fall 2014

Spring 2015

Fall 2015

Spring 2016

Fall 2016

Spring 2017

301

308

392

381

448

454

Construction and Concrete Industry Job Fairs

The CSM Program began offering its own Job Fairs in the Fall of 2009, which today commonly attract 60-70 employers seeking students for internship, summer employment and fulltime employment.  Following is a table showing the number of both employers and students attending these very popular events.

Fall 2014

Spring 2015

Fall 2015

Spring 2016

Fall 2016

Spring 2017

Employers

Students

Employers

Students

Employers

Students

Employers

Students

Employers

Students

Employers

Students

66

253

70

222

67

297

72

268

66

420

62

380

The Job Fair dates for the 2017/2018 Academic year are September 28, 2017 and February 15, 2018. This event is typically held in the LBJ Student Center Ballroom, from 1:00-4:00 pm.

Job Placement Record

Students in the CSM Degree have a very high job placement rate, because of the high demand for these professionals in the Construction Industry. The demand is particularly high in Texas, as the population continues to grow as more companies move to or expand in the state, partially because of relatively low land cost, low state taxes and low utility costs. It is predicted that population of the state will double by 2050, thus requiring an expanded “Built Environment” to accommodate the growth. Following is our Job Placement rate our Senior Exit Surveys for the last two academic years, based on the time it took CSM Graduates to find their first job.

2015/2016

2016/2017

Before Graduation

0-6 months

Total

Before Graduation

0-6 months

Total

76%

17%

93%

 

 

 

Construction Industry Placement by Sector

Based on information provided by graduating CSM majors on their Senior Exit Survey, they found employment in the following industries.

Year

Commercial

Residential

Heavy Civil & Highway

Industrial & Offshore

Other

2014/2015

60%

33%

0%

0%

7%

2015/2016

62%

15%

23%

0%

0%

2016/2017

 

 

 

 

 

Degrees Awarded by Semester

The following table shows the number of CSM majors that graduate per year by semesters. The University holds three (3) graduation ceremonies, which are held in the middle of May, August and December, with Fall and Spring graduations being the most common for CSM majors.

Semester

2014

2015

2016

2017

Spring

16

22

20

 

Summer

8

8

9

 

Fall

7

24

26

 

TOTAL

31

54

55

 

Student Achievements

The following scholarships are available to all Construction Science and Management (CSM) Majors through the Department of Engineering Technology.  The application forms are available in the Main Office of the Roy F. Mitte (RFM) Building, room 2240, the first Monday of October and are to be completed and submitted by the first Monday in November.  The scholarships awardees are announced in December, with funds made available for the following spring semester.  Below is a list of the Departmental Scholarships available to CSM majors along with a summary of their requirements (See scholarship application for a complete list of qualifications).

Construction Science and Management specific scholarships

  • Construction Excellence Fund Scholarship
    • 3.0 minimum major GPA
    • 2.75 minimum overall GPA
    • 75 counting hours completed towards the CSM Degree
  • Home Builders of Greater Austin Scholarship
    • Interested in the Home Building Industry
    • 3.0 minimum major GPA
    • 2.75 minimum overall GPA
    • 60 counting hours completed towards the CSM Degree
  • K-W Construction Scholarship
    • 2.5 minimum major GPA
    • 2.25 minimum overall GPA
    • 60 counting hours completed towards the CSM Degree
  • Ron Mostyn Construction Scholarship
    • 3.25 minimum major GPA
    • 3.0 minimum overall GPA
    • 60 counting hours completed towards the CSM Degree
  • Joseph E. Winek Construction Scholarship
    • Freshman and sophomore scholarship
    • 3.0 minimum overall GPA
    • 0-59 counting hours towards the CSM Degree

 

General Departmental Scholarships available to all Departmental Majors

  • The William L. Deck Scholarship
    • 3.0 minimum overall GPA
    • 2.75 minimum GPA in major
    • 60 counting hours completed towards the student’s degree
  • Dr. Joe Walker Education Grant
    • 3.0 minimum major GPA
    • 2.5 minimum overall GPA
    • 60 counting hours completed towards the student’s degree

See link below for 2016/2017 scholarship honorees:


Alumni Survey

The Alumni Survey was sent to CSM students who graduated between 2013-2015

  • Alumni found employment in the following construction industries
    • Commercial Construction 45%
    • Residential Construction 14%
    • Heavy, Civil and Highway 14%
  • Student salaries between 60-69K were reported by 46% of the respondents
  • Eighty-one (81%) of the respondents were either “Extremely” or “Very” satisfied with construction as an undergraduate major
  • Fifty percent (50%) were either “Extremely” or “Very” satisfied with how well the degree prepared them for a career in construction
  • The three (3) courses that received “Extremely” or “Very” useful ratings were:
    • TECH 2190, Industrial Internship (96%)
    • CSM 4360, Capstone (91%)
    • CSM4364, Project Management Scheduling (87%)

The above information is reviewed by the faculty, who develop a plan to make improvements to the information obtained from the Alumni Survey.

See the link below for the complete survey results.


Senior Exit Survey 2015 and 2016

The CSM Program also uses computer surveys both its graduating seniors and its Alumni to both collect and summarize the data. Below is a summarization of the results.

This survey is sent to our graduating seniors about a month after they graduate.

  • Graduates find employment in the following construction industries:
    • Commercial Construction 61%
    • Residential Construction 24%
    • Heavy, Civil and Highway 12%
  • Time to find employment
    • Had found employment before they graduated 76%
    • Only 7% took more than 6 months to find employment
  • 48% of CSM Graduates were either “Extremely” or “Very” satisfied with construction as their choice of major
  • 93% had contact with CSM Faculty Advisor
  • CSM major courses that graduates found “Extremely” or “Very” useful were:
    • Industrial Internship (TECH 2190) at 79%
    • Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing Systems (CSM 3367) 72%
    • Senior Capstone Course (CSM 4360) at 68%

The faculty reviews the rating of all major courses and develops a plan to improve the ratings during the next survey cycle.

See the link below for the complete survey results.


Construction Advisory Board Course Review (2016/2017)

The Construction Advisory Board, made up pf representatives from the industry, review the catalog descriptions of the required major and minor courses for the degree. The following courses received either an “Extremely” or “Very” useful rating:

  • TECH 2190, Industrial Internship 100%
  • CSM 4360, Capstone 100%
  • CSM 4361, Construction Estimating 100%
  • MGT 3303, Management of Organization 100%

The three (3) courses receiving the lowest ratings were:

  • CIS 3317, E-Business 61%
  • ECO 2301, Principles of Economics 62%
  • CSM 4368, Environmentally Conscious Design and Construction 58%

The faculty reviews the ratings of all required major and minor courses and works with Construction Advisory Boards’ Curriculum Committee to determine the best course of action.

 See the link below for the complete survey results.


Employer Survey 2016/2017

Employees of our CSM Graduates are also surveyed to determine how well our graduates perform on the job. This is one of the external measurement used to judge the quality of the program.

The employees rated our alumni on seven (7) different characteristics:

  • Oral communications: 17% Extremely satisfied, 67% Very satisfied
  • Ability to Learn: 33% Extremely satisfied, 67% Very satisfied
  • Quality of Work: 17% Extremely satisfied, 83% Very satisfied
  • Written Communications: 17% Extremely satisfied, 17% Very satisfied
  • Leadership Quality: 50% Extremely satisfied, 50% Very satisfied
  • Overall Performance: 0% Extremely satisfied, 100% very satisfied

The faculty reviews these ratings and determines the best means to make improvement to the curriculum to increase these ratings the next time the survey is administered.

See the link below for the complete survey results.


Student Awards (DOCX, 15 KB)