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Graduate - MAAPE

PHILOSOPHY - MASTERS OF ARTS APPLIED PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS

 

 

Applied Philosophy is the fastest growing sector of the discipline of philosophy and addresses the need for comprehensive, normative, informed and logically consistent responses to challenges encountered in business, medicine, globalizing politics, economics, and education. The theoretical frameworks and analytic skills imparted in the Applied Philosophy and Ethics program are applicable to a wide range of practical affairs: public policy, educational methodology, leadership, community organization, ecological planning, and civic responsibility.

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Master of Arts in Applied Philosophy and Ethics - Program Information CLICK HERE

 

PHILOSOPHY - MASTERS OF ARTS APPLIED PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS

 
Applied Philosophy is the fastest growing sector of the discipline of philosophy and addresses the need for comprehensive, normative, informed and logically consistent responses to challenges encountered in business, medicine, globalizing politics, economics, and education. The theoretical frameworks and analytic skills imparted in the Applied Philosophy and Ethics program are applicable to a wide range of practical affairs: public policy, educational methodology, leadership, community organization, ecological planning, and civic responsibility.
 
Coursework requirements:
All students are required to take Phil 5301 (Applied Philosophy) and Phil 5302 (Dialogue). Both of these courses can be repeated (one time) for credit. 
Six credit hours of coursework (“free electives”) must be chosen from graduate courses in cognate fields other than philosophy (e.g., Anthropology, English, History, Political Science, Sociology, Women’s Studies). 
Students will choose either the thesis or non-thesis option. The thesis option is recommended for some students planning on pursuing doctoral studies in philosophy.  Please review the Thesis Tips and MAAPE Thesis Proposals documents and talk with the Graduate Advisor (Dr. McKinney) and other members of the Graduate Faculty to determine whether this option is right for you. 
Thesis option.  Students on the thesis track are required to complete 30 hours of coursework and to take Phil 5399A (Thesis) and Phil 5399B (Thesis). (Phil 5399B may be repeated, but only six hours of thesis coursework can be counted toward the degree.) Non-thesis option. Students choosing not to write a thesis are required to complete 33 credit hours, compile a portfolio of their coursework, and successfully participate in an exit examination.
 
Overview:
 
Category
Semester Credit Hours
(Thesis Track)
Semester Credit Hours (Non-Thesis Track)
Required Courses
12
6
Philosophy Electives
12
21
Out-of-department Graduate Electives
6
6
Other (Final Examination/Interview about Portfolio and Progress in the Program)
0
0
TOTAL
30
33
 
  
Thesis and Non-Thesis Tracks:
 
Prefix and Number
Required Courses (Both Tracks)
SCH
Phil 5301
Applied Philosophy (repeatable as a prescribed elective with different emphases)
 
3
Phil 5302
Dialogue (repeatable as a prescribed elective with different emphases)
 
3
 
 
Required Courses (Thesis Track)
 
Phil 5399A
Thesis
 
3
Phil 5399B
Thesis
 
3
 
 
 
Prefix and Number
Philosophy Elective Courses
(12 hours, thesis-track; 21 hours,
non-thesis-track)
SCH
Phil 5301
Applied Philosophy (may be repeated for credit as a prescribed elective with different emphases)
3
Phil 5302
Dialogue (may be repeated for credit as a prescribed elective with different emphases)
3
Phil 5303
Philosophy of Technology
3
Phil 5304 Philosophy of Language 3
Phil 5304 American Philosophy 3
Phil 5320 History of Ethics 3
Phil 5322
Professional Ethics
3
Phil 5323
Environmental Ethics
3
Phil 5324
Meaning of Life
3
Phil 5325
Philosophy of Sex and Love
3
Phil 5326
Philosophy of Sport
3
Phil 5327
Medical Ethics and Bio-ethics
3
Phil 5327
Major Work or Theme in Ethics 3
Phil 5351
Philosophy of Education
3
Phil 5355
Philosophical Theory of Science
3
Phil 5356 Philosophical Theory of Knowledge 3
Phil 5388
Problems in Philosophy (may be repeated for credit with different emphases)
3
Phil 5395
Internship in Applied Philosophy
3
 

Philosophy Minor

 
 
A graduate minor in philosophy consists of 6 to 15 hours (depending on your major requirement) of course work from the following courses:
PHIL 5301 - Applied Philosophy
PHIL 5302 - Dialogue
PHIL 5303 - Philosophy of Technology
PHIL 5322 - Business and Professional Ethics
PHIL 5323 - Environmental Ethics
PHIL 5324 - Meaning of Life
PHIL 5351 - Philosophy of Education
PHIL 5388 - Problems in Philosophy

Philosophy 5301 and 5388 may be repeated for credit. This minor is designed to support other graduate programs.

pdf iconA word (or two) about MAAPE thesis proposals : MAAPE Thesis Proposals(PDF, 34.6 KB)

A Few Words About MAAPE Thesis Proposals

pdf iconThesis tips for MAAPE : MAAPE Thesis(PDF, 23.1 KB)

Tips for MAAPE Thesis

pdf iconTips for MAAPE students : Tips for MAAPE Students(PDF, 198.9 KB)

Some Helpful Tips for Students in the MAAPE Program.

pdf iconMAAPE : Course requirements (PDF, 27.7 KB)

Important Information for MAAPE Students

Tips for MAAPE Students

Tips for MAAPE Students Spring 2014

 

Greetings!  Applied Philosophy is one of the emerging fields in the discipline, and the Department of Philosophy at Texas State University-San Marcos is pleased to offer a master’s degree in Applied Philosophy and Ethics.

Graduate Advisor:  

                                    Audrey McKinney 

                                    512.245.2047 

                                    amckinney@txstate.edu

Assistant Graduate Advisor:

                                    Craig Hanks

                                    512.245.2285

                                    ch25@txstate.edu

Chair of the Philosophy Department:

                                    Vince Luizzi                       

                                    512.245.2285

                                    vluizzi@txstate.edu

Coursework requirements:

All students are required to take Phil 5301 (Applied Philosophy) and Phil 5302 (Dialogue).  Phil 5301 and Phil 5302 can be repeated (one time) for credit. 

Six credit hours of coursework (“free electives”) must be chosen from cognate fields other than philosophy (e.g., Anthropology, English, History, Political Science, Sociology, Women’s Studies) and require approval by the Graduate Advisor.  The two courses will be drawn from a single discipline or will collectively comprise a coherent area of applied study.

Students will choose either the thesis or non-thesis option.  The thesis option is especially recommended for students planning on pursuing doctoral studies in philosophy.    

Thesis option.  Students on the thesis track are required to complete 30 hours of coursework and to take Phil 5399A (Thesis) and Phil 5399B (Thesis).  (Phil 5399B may be repeated, but only six hours of thesis coursework can be counted toward the degree.) 

Non-thesis option.  Students choosing not to write a thesis are required to complete 33 credit hours, compile a portfolio of their coursework, and successfully participate in an exit examination.

IA positions:

A limited number of Instructional Assistant positions are available each year, and students in the MAAPE program and the MSIS program in Sustainability are eligible to apply.  IAs typically assist the instructor of record in the large sections of Philosophy and Critical Reasoning and Ethics and Society.   Applications for the position of IA are accepted in the spring semester.  (For the due dates for applications, see the Graduate Advisor or Departmental Chair.)  The IA position may be renewed for a second year given satisfactory performance. IAs are required to be enrolled in 9 hours of graduate coursework each semester of their employment and, during their first three semesters in the IA position, must enroll in Phil 5100 (Practicum in Teaching Philosophy).  Phil 5100 does not earn graduate credit.  

IAs are expected to undertake with diligence their responsibilities both as IAs and as students in the MAAPE program; failure to do so will result in a review by the department’s Personnel Committee.   The Graduate College requires that an IA maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA, and the Departmental expectation is that an IA achieves a 3.0 each semester.

Certificate in Professional Ethics:

Students in the MAAPE program may earn the six-hour Certificate in Professional Ethics by taking Phil 5322 (Professional Ethics).  Either Phil 5301 (Applied Philosophy) or Phil 5302 (Dialogue) can be used to fulfill the remaining three credit hour requirement.

To be enrolled in the Certificate Program, you need to submit an application (and a $10 fee) through the Graduate College.  After completing the required course work (with a 3.00 average in the two courses), you will also need to submit an Application of Completion. Links to the application forms may be found at: http://www.gradcollege.txstate.edu/Prospect_Students/Pgms_Apps/TXST_Cert.html

Independent Study Courses (Phil 5388):

Phil 5388 courses serve primarily as independent study/directed reading courses when students have a specific area that they wish to study in greater depth than typically offered by a course.  Sometimes as well students take Phil 5388 to have the opportunity to attend an upper-level undergraduate course and undertake additional work under the guidance of the course instructor.  In either event, a student must secure permission from the supervising instructor in advance before being able to enroll in the course.

Online Courses:

At present, both Phil 5301 (Applied Philosophy) and Phil 5322 (Professional Ethics) are offered online each Spring and Fall semester as well as during some summer sessions.  Other courses including Phil 3323 (Environmental Ethics) are offered online occasionally as well.

Applying for Graduation:

As you embark on your final semester’s work in the MAAPE program, keep in mind the need to formally apply for graduation.  Typically, the deadline for the application is the eighth week of classes (e.g., before Spring Break during the spring semesters).  For further details and the deadlines for the present semester, see the Graduate College website: http://www.gradcollege.txstate.edu/Current_Students/Graduation.html

Further information on both the thesis and non-thesis tracks may be found at the Department of Philosophy website (www.txstate.edu/philosophy/).  Do not hesitate to consult with the Graduate Advisor, Chair, or other faculty if you have any questions about the program.

Tips for Non-Thesis Students: Portfolio and Exit Exam

Tips for Non-thesis Track MAAPE Students:  Exit Examination and Portfolio

 

Students on the non-thesis track must turn in a portfolio of their work and take an oral exit examination.  Typically this is done during your final semester of coursework.

 

Exit Examination

To prepare for the exit examination, identify the three papers you have written while in the MAAPE program that you believe best demonstrate your critical reasoning abilities as well as your detailed knowledge of one or more areas of applied philosophy or ethics. Review these papers with care: at least initially the faculty participating in the exit interview will focus on these works and related philosophical issues, though faculty are also free to ask any questions relevant to your course of study in the program.

Make sure to put copies of the three papers in your portfolio and explicitly indicate that they are the ones you have chosen for the exit interview.

 

Portfolio. In addition to the three papers you have identified for the exit interview, your portfolio should contain all of your written work (papers, essays, examinations) that you have done for the MAAPE degree as well as a listing of your course grades. You should include a short overview essay describing your progress in the program and discussing how your work addresses at least some of the six outcomes we have set up for our program.

 

The six outcomes we hope that students in the MAAPE program achieve are:

 

         Advanced knowledge of major theories and theoretical debates in Applied Philosophy and Ethics (MT)

         Advanced knowledge of relevant literature in the student’s area of concentration (KC)

         Advanced knowledge of relevant literature in the student’s chosen cognate field (CF)

         Ability to apply relevant philosophical analysis to “real world” situations (RW)

         Ability to engage in productive, theoreticallyinformed dialogue (D)

         Ability to choose methodologies and texts relevant to the student’s areas of concentration (RT)

          

          

Mark relevant portions of the works you include in the portfolio to highlight ways in which your work exemplifies the outcomes.

 

Remember to identify explicitly the three papers for the exit examination; place them in a separate area of the portfolio.

 

Thesis Tips

Thesis tips for MAAPE thesis-track students: Phil 5399A

 

 

Before signing up for Phil 5399A, the first of two thesis courses, you will need to have approval from a member of the graduate faculty who has agreed to serve as the director of your thesis committee.

 

Identifying a thesis advisor:  Your thesis advisor is the single most important person you will work with in developing your thesis, and you should select your advisor from the graduate faculty with as much care and foresight as possible.  Your choice of advisor should be guided by a consideration of: 1) who has the appropriate experience and expertise to guide your project (and whose research and teaching interests are best suited to your research topic), and 2) who is someone you believe you can work well with, someone whose mentoring style will be conducive to nurturing your philosophical development.  Start looking for an advisor early in your time in the program:  meet faculty, attend dialogues and departmental events, read the work of faculty members, talk with other students in the program (especially those who are well into their own thesis work) and attend thesis defenses.  Once you have decided with whom you would like to work, make an appointment with the faculty member, discuss your project, and request that she

or he serve as your advisor.

 

Early in the semester during which you are enrolled in Thesis A, you should:

 

     In consultation with your thesis advisor, determine what graduate faculty might serve as your two additional committee members. At least two members of your committee (including your advisor) must be members of the Philosophy Department. You may have committee members from other departments.

     Prepare an abstract of your thesis project (accompanied by an annotated bibliography) to show to the potential committee members.

     •     Secure agreement from the chosen faculty to serve on your committee.

     Develop a draft of your thesis proposal in consultation with your thesis advisor, ideally within the first 6-8 weeks of Thesis A.  (See “A word (or two) about MAAPE thesis proposals”.)

 

Once you have a full draft of the proposal, all of your committee members should review and comment upon the draft. You will then revise the draft and craft a final version. (NOTE: be sure to allow sufficient time (generally, about two weeks) for your committee members to review your work.)

 

When your committee as a whole has agreed to your proposal, download the “Proposed Thesis Research” form from the Graduate College :  http://www.gradcollege.txstate.edu/Thes- Diss_Info/T-D_Forms.html After the form is signed by each of your committee members and the Chair of the department, turn it in to the Graduate College.

 

The latter part of the Thesis A course should be devoted to constructing at least one chapter of the thesis.

 

Remember that a full draft of the thesis must be provided to your committee members before midterm  of the semester in which you are enrolled in Thesis B (Phil 5399B) and expect to graduate.  If you do not meet the deadlines, it will be necessary for you to re-enroll in Phil 5399B the following semester. DO NOT PLAN ON HAVING A THESIS DEFENSE SCHEDULED DURING EITHER OF THE SUMMER SESSIONS. If you do not complete your thesis in the spring semester, you should expect to enroll in Phil 5399B again in the fall.

About your Thesis Proposal

A word (or two) about MAAPE thesis proposals

You’ll need to address the following questions in your thesis proposal: What is the main claim you will be exploring and defending in the thesis? What are the methodologies you will be making use of? What arguments will you be putting forward? What is important about the claims you are making?

A helpful template for your thesis proposal is:

  1. Title
  2. Introduction: Provide a clear and succinct statement of your topic and the central claim you will be defending.
  3. Background: Present the philosophical terrain in which the problem you are addressing arises. Who are the seminal authors, and what are the key texts and positions which serve to “set the stage” for your study? This part of the proposal should help you to establish the context for and importance of your thesis.
  4. Methodology: What method of inquiry will be guiding your work? Possibilities include analytic argumentation, phenomenological investigation, critical textual analysis, and empirical research, among (many) others.1
  5. Chapters: Provide a description of the chapters you expect the thesis to contain.
  6. Timeline: Set projected dates for completion of each of the chapters of the thesis. As you construct your timeline, keep in mind that a full draft of the thesis must be provided to your committee members before midterm of the semester in which you are enrolled in Thesis B (Phil 5399B) and expect to graduate.
  7. Bibliography

The final version of your proposal should be 8 to 15 pages and be formatted in accordance with either MLA or Chicago (Turabian) guidelines. (A very helpful resource, RefWorks, is available through the university library: http://www.library.txstate.edu/about/departments/ref/refworks.html)

Caveat: Producing a thesis proposal and the thesis itself is a prolonged and painstaking task not to be undertaken by the “faint-hearted” (or undisciplined) student. DON’T choose to write a thesis simply because you plan to go on to doctoral work in the field. Though you will need a writing sample when applying for doctoral programs, an excellent one can be developed from a course paper or in an independent study course. You do not need to have written a thesis in order to be a strong candidate for a PhD program, and not having written a thesis says nothing about your likely success in doctoral studies. Consider whether the additional coursework you would undertake as a non-thesis track student might better prepare you for your future graduate studies than would writing the thesis.

And do recognize that you are not ready to engage in a thesis project if you just have a general idea of an area of inquiry that you’d like to pursue (or an idea or two that you might like to develop). We strongly suggest that all thesis-track students develop a firm grasp on their topics prior to taking Phil 5399A. You can do this by devoting a course paper or papers to your topic or by undertaking an independent study (Phil 5388) with a member of the graduate faculty well-versed in your area of interest.

1 Any research involving human subjects (e.g., questionnaires, interviews) must be approved in advance by the Texas State University IRB (Institutional Review Board). You (and your advisor) must complete online training before submitting your proposed study for IRB approval. For further information see “Tips for MAAPE students”.

Graduate Faculty

 

Graduate Faculty

 

 

Barcenas, Alejandro, Assistant Professor, Lic., Universidad Central de Venezuela; M.A., Ph.D., University of Hawai’i at Manoa.  (History of Philosophy, Latin American Philosophy, Comparative Philosophy, Asian Philosophy (Chinese, Japanese and Buddhist philosophy), Aesthetics, Political Theory)

 

Fischer, Robert, Assistant Professor, B.A., State University of New York at Geneseo; M.A., Trinity International University; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago. (Philosophy of Science, Epistemology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Language, Contemporary Analytic Philosophy, Philosophy of Religion, Applied Ethics)

 

Fulmer, Gil, Professor, B.A., Ph.D., Rice University (Ethics, Philosophy of Religion, Metaphysics)

 

Geuras, Dean, Professor, B.A., Columbia University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder. (Analytic Philosophy, Ethics in Public Policy)

 

Gordon, Jeffrey, Professor, B.A., Northwestern University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder. (Existentialism, Phenomenology, Meaning of Life)

 

Hanks, Craig, Professor, B.A., Texas A&M University; Ph.D., Duke University (Philosophy of Technology, American Pragmatism, Critical Theory, Social and Political Philosophy, Applied Ethics)

 

Hutcheson, Peter, Professor, B.A., University of West Florida; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma.  (Epistemology, Philosophy of Science, Phenomenology and Existentialism, Philosophy of Religion, Descartes, Hume)

 

Joy, Glenn, Professor, B.A., Seattle Pacific University; M.A., Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin. (Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Religion, Classical Utilitarianism)

 

Lewis, Holly, Assistant Professor, B.A., State University of New York; M.L.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.F.A., New York University; Ph.D., European Graduate School (Aesthetics, Social and Political Philosophy, Continental Philosophy, Media Theory, Gender)

 

Luizzi, Vincent, Professor, B.A., University of Rochester; J.D., Boston University School of Law; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (Ethics, Philosophy of Law, American, Pragmatism, Social and Political Philosophy, Professional Ethics)

 

Marquez, Ivan, Assistant Professor, B.S., University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras; M.A., Ph.D., University of Indiana Bloomington. (Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy, Continental Philosophy, Ancient and Early Medieval Philosophy, Evolutionary Complexity and Systems Thinking, Early Analytic Philosophy, Pragmatism)

 

McKinney, Audrey, Associate Professor, B.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (Environmental Ethics, Logic, Philosophy of Logic, Philosophy of Sexuality, Philosophy of Film)   

 

Raphael, Rebecca, Associate Professor, B.S., Northwestern University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago (Biblical Studies, Classics, Literary Criticism, Religious Studies)

 

Yuan, LiJun, Associate Professor, B.A., Shanxi University; M.A., Nankai University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder. (Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy, Asian Philosophy, Feminist Philosophy)

 

 

 

 

 

Associate Graduate Faculty

 

 

Benedikt, Amelie, Senior Lecturer, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., The University of Texas at

Austin.  (Existentialism, Aesthetics, History of Philosophy, Ethics)

 

Carson, Jo Ann, Senior Lecturer, B.A., Texas State University; Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin (Philosophy of Education, Philosophy of Language, Applied Philosophy, Theory of Dialectic/Dialogue)

 

Gilbertson, Eric, Senior Lecturer, B.A., Texas Lutheran University; M.A., University of Houston; Ph.D., Cornell University (Epistemology, Metaphysics, Analytic Philosophy)

 

Mehta, Binita, Senior Lecturer (Indian Philosophy and Religion, Comparative Mysticism and Aesthetics, Platonic Philosophy)

 

Kanon, Eli, Lecturer, B.A., Texas State University; M.A., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., Florida State University (Environmental Ethics, Logic, Metaethics)

 

O’Connor, Robert.  Lecturer, B.A., Georgetown University; Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin.  (Ethics, Applied Philosophy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graduate Instructional Assistant Application

Graduate Instructional Assistant Application (2) : Graduate Student Instructional Assistant Application (DOCX, 19.3 KB)

FOR NEW IAs: If you are interested in working as an Instructional Assistant in Philosophy, please submit this application, along with all supporting documents, to the Department of Philosophy office (102 COMAL).

Spring Application Deadline: April 1st
Fall Application Deadline: November 1st

RETURNING IAs: A written statement of intent to continue is due to the Departmental office by 1 April for fall employment.