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Undergraduate Philosophy and Religion Courses

Courses in Philosophy

icon (WI) PHIL 1305 Philosophy and Critical Thinking. (3-0) A study of universal philosophical problems and their solutions with a view toward developing clear thinking about knowledge, belief, and value. Approximately one half of this course will focus on the student’s critical thinking skills. Credit cannot be given for both PHIL 1305 and 3301.
ethics PHIL 1320 Ethics and Society. (3-0) Study of ethics, its recent focus on social problems, and new fields of inquiry, including environmental ethics, ethics in business, professions, technology and sport. Also such global issues as poverty, minority rights, and stem cell research. Emphasis on development and application of principles of critical thinking and moral reasoning.
icon PHIL 1330 Critical Thinking. (3-0) Study of informal fallacies, valid argument forms, problem solving strategies, language clarification, and application of analytic skills.
(WI) 2311 (PHIL 2316) History of Philosophy Before 1600. (3-0) Early Greek, Roman, and medieval systems of thought.
a (WI) 2312 (PHIL 2317) History of Philosophy Since 1600. (3-0) Modern philosophical thought through the 19th century.
a 2330 (PHIL 2303) Elementary Logic. (3-0) A study of the nature and forms of correct reasoning, both deductive and inductive.
(WI) 3301 Philosophical Issues. (3-0) The great philosophical concepts that have challenged the best thoughts of people and have contributed to the fulfillment of the good life. Emphasis upon the applicability of those concepts to human life in our time and to the development of intellectual perspective. Approximately one half of this course will focus on the student’s critical thinking skills. Credit cannot be given for both PHIL 3301 and 1305.
(WI) 3314 American Philosophy. (3-0) Examination of contributions of Americans to perennial philosophical issues.
(WI) 3315 Contemporary Philosophy. (3-0) Selected readings in late 19th and 20th century philosophy: existentialism, positivism, analytic philosophy, phenomenology, and pragmatism. Prerequisite: 3 hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of instructor.
(WI) 3316 Existentialism and Phenomenology. (3-0) A study of the nature of human experience and existence in the philosophies of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, and Camus. Topics will include freedom, dread, emotion, death, other minds, faith, and the past as experienced by the individual. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor.
(WI) 3317 Science and Religion. (3-0) An examination of modern science and Western religion, and an analysis of the issues and ideas involved in the relationships between them. Prerequisites: 3 hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor.
(WI) 3318 Reason, God and Nature. (3-0) An analysis of the concept of God, terms predicated on God, and theological propositions. An attempt to determine the nature of religious utterances in comparison with those of everyday life, scientific discovery, morality, and imaginative expression. Prerequisite: 3 hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of instructor. (Capstone)
(WI) 3320 Ethics. (3-0) A study of classical and contemporary philosophical inquiries into our knowledge of the “good” and the grounds of moral obligation. May be repeated once for additional credit. (Capstone) Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor.
  (WI) 3321 Contemporary Moral Problems. (3-0) Exploration of philosophical dimensions of contemporary moral problems such as abortion, euthanasia, poverty, animal rights, nuclear war, and privacy in a computer age. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. May be repeated once for additional credit.
(WI) 3322 Professional Ethics. (3-0) Study of major topics in business and professional ethics, including what a profession is, whether it differs from business, and what is involved with the moral education, social responsibilities, and ethical standards of professionals and business people. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. (Capstone)
3323 Environmental Ethics. (3-0) Study of ethical issues associated with the environment including nature, use, preservation, and restoration of the environment.
(WI) 3324 Meaning of Life. (3-0) Investigation of major theories of the meaning of life in Western and Eastern philosophies.
(WI) 3325 Philosophy of Sex and Love. (3-0) Critical survey of major thinking on sex and love from ancient to modern times.
  (WI) 3326 Philosophy and Sport. (3-0) Examines philosophical issues in sport, including the social significance of sport, ethical issues, gender equity, sport and race, mind and body in sport, aesthetics, sport and self-knowledge, and the connection of sport and philosophy. Prerequisite: 3 hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of instructor.
(WI) 3331 Philosophy of Law. (3-0) The major theses which have been set forth in the history of jurisprudence including foundations of law, natural law, legal positivism, and the judicial process. (Capstone) 333
(WI) 3332 Social and Political Philosophy. (3-0) Critical examination of major theories concerning the organization of societies and governments. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. (Capstone)
(WI) 3333 Feminist Theory. (3-0) This course will examine major feminist theories including liberal feminism, Marxist feminism, radical feminism, and post-modernist feminism with an eye especially to revealing the complexity and diversity of contemporary feminist thought. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, WS 3376 or 3377, or permission of the instructor. (Satisfies multicultural credit.)
3340 Symbolic Logic. (3-0) Study of the logic of propositions through prepositional calculi, formal proofs, and first-order functional calculi. Also included is an investigation into the axiomatic method as used in logic and mathematics, including the concepts of completeness and consistency. Prerequisite: PHIL 2330, or MATH 2372, or consent of instructor.
(WI) 3351 Philosophy and Literature. (3-0) The course explores the relation between philosophy and literature. Prerequisite: Three hours lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of instructor.
indian philosophy 3381 The Philosophical and Spiritual Heritage of India. (3-0)
Philosophy in India is essentially spiritual. Accordingly,
sages of India, both ancient and modern, use reason and
the examination of experience to make the insights of the
spiritual tradition accessible. This course will explore Indian
spiritual philosophy from the time of the ancient Vedas to
the contributions of modern sages.
(WI) 4301 Applied Philosophy. (3-0) Practical application of methods and teaching of philosophy to religion, science, morality, politics, art, or literature. The study of one or more of these areas will demonstrate how philosophy contributes to the identification of issues as well as their resolution. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 3 hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of instructor. (Capstone)
(WI) 4302 Dialogue. (3-0) Study of literature about the nature, purpose, and significance of dialogue along with active participation in the dialogues of the Department of Philosophy’s Dialogue Series. Prerequisite: PHIL 1305 or permission of the instructor.
(WI) 4303 Philosophy of Technology. (3-0) Study of philosophical and ethical dimensions of technology including the nature of technology and technological progress, the relation of humans to the technological environment, whether technology is value-laden, and the social character of technology. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor.
(WI) 4350 Philosophy of the Arts. (3-0) A critical and historical analysis of the nature of aesthetic experience and creative genius. Prerequisite: three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. (Capstone)
(WI) 4351 Philosophy of Education. (3-0) Study of major philosophical theories on nature, values, and purpose of education.
(WI) 4355 Philosophical Theory of Science. (3-0) Study of the major theories concerning the nature and value of science and the scientific method. Repeatable for credit with different emphasis. Prerequisite: 3 hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of instructor. (Capstone)
(WI) 4356 Philosophical Theory of Knowledge. (3-0) A study of the major theories concerning knowledge, belief, certainty, and perception. Repeatable for credit with different emphasis. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor.
(WI) 4370 Metaphysics. (3-0) Systematic study of metaphysical problems by examination of classical and modern texts. Topics considered will involve being and unity, mind and matter, God, causation and necessity, free will and determinism. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor.
(WI) 4371 Asian Philosophy. (3-0) The course covers mainly Chinese and Indian philosophy, such as Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism. How do people in the orient look at the meanings of life, the nature of the world and their place in the world? This course shall shed light on these issues. May be repeated for credit.
latin american (WI) 4372 Latin American Philosophy. (3-0) Study of ancient Latin
American thought, including Mayan, Aztec, Toltec, and
Incan, pre- and post conquest Latin American philosophy,
contemporary Latin American philosophy, and the thinking
of Latin Americans in the U.S. Prerequisite: PHIL 1305 or
permission of the instructor.
4388 Problems in Philosophy. (3-0) Independent study of specific problems in philosophy. Open to students on an individual or small group basis by arrangement with the Department of Philosophy. Problem area, bibliography, and study paper outline are to be approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. May be repeated once for additional credit.

 

Courses in Religion

  1300 World Religions. (3-0) This course will be a survey and comparative
study of the major religions of the world including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism,
Confucianism, and the Indigenous Religions. Recommended as an entry course for religion minors.

  2310 Hebrew Scriptures: Survey of the Old Testament. (3-0) An introduction to the contemporary academic study of the Hebrew Bible.(“Old Testament”) and related Near Eastern and Second Temple Jewish literature. Representative texts will be examined using the historical and literary methods of scholarship.
  2315 Introduction to the New Testament. (3-0) An introduction
to the contemporary academic study of the New Testament, including apocryphal and post-canonical works.
Representative texts will be examined using the historical and literary methods of scholarship.
  (WI) 2321 Founders, Prophets and Saints. (3-0) Critical analysis of the life, works, and thought of a major religious figure, e.g., Jesus, Paul, Luther, St.Teresa, Maimonides, the Baal Shem Tov, Mohammad, al-Ghazzali, Rumi, Buddha, Gandhi. May be repeated for credit.
religious art 3340 Religion, Literature, and the Arts. (3-0) The course features
a thematic selection of literary and artistic works in order to examine the connections and disconnections between the aesthetic and religious aspects of human culture. May be taken twice for credit with different topics. (WI)
odyssey 3342 The Homeric Epic: The Illiad and the Odyssey. (3-0) A close reading of the Iliad and the Odyssey in English translation, with emphasis on philosophical and religious issues. Prominent topics include the gods, religious rituals, heroic ethics, and the human condition. The course also considers the concept of a classic in religion and literature. (WI)
  (WI) 3360 Asian Religious Traditions. (3-0) A survey of the major religious traditions originating in Asia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Shinto. Basic doctrines and practices will be covered in an historical framework. Some attention will be given to related Asian movements, e.g. Jainism, Sikhism, and Confucianism.
  (WI) 3364 Abrahamic Religious Traditions. (3-0) A comparative study of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Basic doctrines and practices will be covered in an historical framework. Attention will be given to both majority and minority variants of each
tradition.
  (WI) 3366 Topics in Western Religions. (3-0) A study of the history, doctrines, and rituals of one of the major Western traditions. Topics may also focus on a major movement or practice shared by more than one tradition. Examples of topics: Judaism; Christianity; Islam; Scripture and Monotheism; Greco-Roman Religions; Religions of Old Europe. Recommended
prerequisite: REL 3365.
mythology 3370 Mythology and Culture. (3-0) A study of mythology as sacred narrative and its role in articulating a culture’s beliefs and values. The course will focus on religious and philosophical themes, including comparison of mythical-traditional thought with modernity. May be taken twice for credit with different topics.
apocalypse 3372 Apocalypticism. (3-0) An historical-cultural survey of end-of-the-world literature, art, and thought in Western Civilization, from ancient Judaism and Christianity to the present. Historical and scientific methods provide the framework for this course. (WI)
aum 3381 The Philosophical and Spiritual Heritage of India. (3-0) Philosophy in India is essentially spiritual. Accordingly, sages of India, both ancient and modern, use reason and the examination of experience to make the insights of the
spiritual tradition accessible. This course will explore Indian spiritual philosophy from the time of the ancient Vedas to
the contributions of modern sages.
religious studies 4300 Methods in Religious Studies. (3-0) A survey of major methods and key theorists in the academic study of religion.
The course is intended as a capstone for religion minors and as graduate school preparation for those planning further
study. Pre-requisites: at least two academic courses in religious studies. (WI)
  4388 Problems in Religion. (3-0) Independent study of specific topics in religion. Open to students on an individual or small group basis. May be repeated for credit with different emphasis.