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'Stolen Education' documentary screening, discussion with producer

Posted by Jayme Blaschke
University News Service
December 11, 2013

Texas State University will host a free screening and discussion of Stolen Education with producer and documentarian Enrique Alemán, Jr., 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 6.

Following the screening, Alemán will conduct a question-and-answer session on the film. The event is sponsored by the College of Education and the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and will be held in the Alkek Teaching Theatre on campus. The event is free and open to the public.

Alemán will also lead a special discussion on Stolen Education for faculty members and graduate students 9:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 7 in room 3066 of the Education Building.

Stolen Education is a powerful documentary that depicts how in Driscoll, during the 1950s, young Mexican American students were racially segregated and required to attend three years of first grade because they were deemed to have what was referred to as "language problems." The film documents the journey of eight children who ended up testifying in what became a landmark Federal desegregation case that changed educational history in Texas.

In this documentary, Alemán visits present day Driscoll and captures the remarkable first-hand testimonials of those children, now in their 60s, who were retained in the first grade and who testified in court. The documentary brings to life the racial climate of the 1950s to the present as well as demonstrates the students’ resiliency and agency.

The event provides insight into how racism and language discrimination is still prevalent in today’s society. It offers an enriching opportunity for dialogue and discussion into the topic of race, inclusion, diversity, and inequality. This event will expose Texas State students, faculty, and the community to a much-needed dialogue concerning future efforts needed on changing practices and policies focused on improving the lives of Latinos in the United States.

Alemán is the assistant vice president for student equity and diversity and an associate professor at the University of Utah. He is a South Texas native from Kingsville and a first-generation college graduate. Alemán melds his personal and professional interests with research that has the potential to address the structural and institutionalized inequities that have historically underserved students and communities of color. He earned his Ph.D. in educational administration, with a concentration in educational policy and planning, from the University of Texas. While at UT, he also completed a doctoral certification in Mexican American studies.

This event is possible due to the efforts of Charise Pimentel, assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education, and Lori Czop Assaf, associate professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education.

For additional information, contact cp26@txstate.edu or lassaf@txstate.edu.

A short trailer to the film, Stolen Education, is available for viewing at www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvkrmeGE58E.

Stolen Education is also on Facebook at www.facebook.com/StolenEducation.

The Quetzal Critical Film Series website is at www.education.txstate.edu/ci/news/Quetzal.html.