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Past Course Offerings

HON 1390A, Greek Civilization
Substitution(s):  HIST 2310 or humanities
Professor(s):  T. Burns, C. Cabaniss, M. Fitzpatrick, D. Lochman
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1990, spring 1991, fall 1991, spring 1992, fall 1992, spring 1993
Course Description:  Students study Ancient Greece. Among other topics, students examine how scientific thought began in the age of Athenian democracy. Students explore the origins of Western thinking as illustrated in the literature, history and philosophy of Ancient Greece.

HON 1390B, Rhetoric Masters of Antiquity
Substitution(s):  non-advanced philosophy
Professor(s):  M. Tangum
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1992
Course Description:  Students will explore the dialogues of Plato, which deal with rhetoric and its relation to philosophy, as well as the works of Socrates and Aristotle, which deal with their views of rhetoric and philosophy.

HON 1390C, Evolution of American Culture
Substitution(s):  HIST 1310
Professor(s):  B. Liddle,  J. McWilliams
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1995, fall 1997, fall 1998, fall 1999, fall 2000, fall 2001, fall 2002, fall 2003, fall 2004, fall 2005, fall 2009
Course Description:  This history course is designed, in part, to introduce you to the University Honors Program and the expectations of the honors faculty. You will discover the interdisciplinary focus of honors courses, for despite the ‘history’ orientation of this course, in the very process of looking into the origins and evolution of American culture, you will find yourself reading about matters associated with economics and the social structure, theology and religion, politics and political history, literature, drama, and the visual arts. During the course of the semester we will attend at least one event outside of class, which will expand the scope of your inquiries even beyond these disciplines. Students must also enroll in US 1100.

HON 1390D, The Greek Experience
Substitution(s):  HIST 2310 or humanities
Professor(s):  P. Cagniart
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1998, fall 1998, fall 1999, fall 2000, fall 2001
Course Description:  This study of Greek society and culture uses Werner Jaeger's study, Paideia, the Ideals of Greek Culture, to immerse students in the nature, significance and development of Greek and Hellenistic cultures. In addition, students will study the greatest philosophical minds of the Western tradition, Plato and Aristotle, to understand the foundation of our philosophical tradition.

HON 1390E, Origins of Civilization
Substitution(s):  ENG 1310 or ENG 1320 or ENG 2330 or ENG 3341 or humanities or ethnic studies minor
Professor(s):  D. Lochman, R. Randolph, D. McCabe, N. Wilson, L. Kosmitis
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1998, fall 1999, fall 2000, fall 2001, fall 2003, fall 2004, fall 2005, fall 2006, fall 2007, fall 2008, fall 2009, fall 2010, fall 2011, fall 2012, fall 2013, fall 2014
Course Description:  A study of literary, mythic and philosophical works selected with special attention to narratives about the origins of humanity and civilization. The course assumes that study of a variety of explanations of human existence will broaden students' perspectives and provide insight into the background of contemporary world cultures. Students will respond to readings in short papers designed to stimulate class discussion, class presentations, a documented paper, and a final examination. Students in this course will be treated to guest lectures from a rabbi and representatives from the Islamic center in Austin. In addition, students will take a field trip to visit a Buddhist place of worship and a Hindu place of worship.

HON 1390G, C.S. Lewis: Chronicles of a Master Communicator
Substitution(s):  COMM 1310
Professor(s):  S. Beebe
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2004, summer 2007, spring 2008, spring 2010, spring 2011, spring 2014
Course Description:  This course examines the writing and life of C.S. Lewis from the standpoint of communication theory and practice. It examines Lewis' role as a speaker, teacher, broadcaster and educator by identifying the underlying rhetorical and communication theories that inform his work. Many of Lewis' most notable books (the Narnia Chronicles, Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, and The Abolition of Man) and essays were originally delivered as lectures or broadcast talks. Although Lewis pre-dated the development of contemporary communication study, because of his widespread knowledge, his writing contains a surprising number of implicit and explicit references to communication theory and principles. This course will invite students to explore Lewis as communicator and, in the process, examine communication theories that inform their personal communication practice.

HON 1390H, Understanding Communication and Technology
Substitution(s):  COMM 1310 or advanced communication studies
Professor(s):  P. Salem
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2005, fall 2008, fall 2010
Course Description:  Topics include the following: the nature of information, communication, technology, texting, social network sites, innovativeness, loneliness, social support, and civic engagement. Lectures, discussion and structured experiences emphasize critical thinking and the effective use of technology.

HON 1390I, The Role of Storyteller in Society
Substitution(s):  TH 1370
Professor(s):  M. Michell
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2005
Course Description:  This course examines the role of the storyteller from ancient times to the present. Students will cultivate an appreciation for the role of oral tradition in the shaping of history, cultural identity, social mores, and personal values. In the process students will become more discerning listeners and more compelling speakers. Whether told against the backdrop of a flickering fire, delivered from a pulpit or a podium, repeated around the dinner table, or instant-messaged on a computer screen, stories provide a map to help us navigate life’s journey. This course will examine who tells the stories, why they tell them, and what makes the good stories so powerful and enduring. Students will address issues of historical, political, social, philosophy, literary and moral significance. Perhaps most important, students will come to understand the value of hearing and telling stories in their own lives.
 
1390L, Writing to Change the World
Substitution: ENG 1310 or 1320
Professor: A. Winchell
Semester offered: fall 2013, fall 2014
Course Description: How do you make your writing for a college course related to the real world? With a focus on global social justice, students will use their writings to promote change through persuasive arguments. Students will identify issues they care about, and analyze existing resources about those issues through writing assignments. In addition, students will volunteer with a local organization to gain first-hand experience in working with their chosen global issues.

HON 2370A, Contemporary Issues in Math and Computer Science
Substitution(s):  non-advanced mathematics for BAs
Professor(s):  J. Edgell
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1995
Course Description:  The goal of this course is to introduce students to structured, discrete probability/statistical spaces and to help them to formulate a role for such in the learning of and applications of probability/statistics. In Socratic fashion, the students will be encouraged to explore, question, discover and record such while experiencing mathematics rationally.

HON 2380A, Contemporary Issues in Modern Science: Philosophy of Science
Substitution(s):  additional science for BAs
Professor(s):  D. Lippman
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1993
Course Description:  This course will define the scientific method and examine its conceptual tools: facts, hypotheses, theories and scientific laws. The course will also examine important concepts in science from ancient time to the present.

HON 2380B, Astronomy in Art, History and Literature
Substitution(s):   Math/Science/Logic for BA or PHYS 1340 or PHYS 1350
Professor(s):  D. Olson
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1994, spring 1996, spring 1998, spring 2000, spring 2002, spring 2004, spring 2008, spring 2010, spring 2012, spring 2014
Course Description:  What was the star that the wise men followed? What night sky objects did Van Gogh include in his "Night Sky" painting? In this class, students will combine astronomy and the humanities, using computers to create simulations of celestial events that affected history or appeared in historical art or literature.

HON 2380C, Global Ecology and Humanity
Substitution(s):  BIO 1320
Professor(s):  P. Barnes
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2001, fall 2002
Course Description:  What are the scientific issues underlying the major means of global change and humanity's central role in contributing to these changes? This interdisciplinary course explores, through selected readings and discussions, some of the ethical, religious and economic aspects of ecology.

HON 2380D, Is This Really Math? Graph Theory and its Applications
Substitutions:  MATH 1315, 1316, 1319, or 4336
Professor:  D. Ferrero
Semesters Offered:  fall 2004, spring 2005, spring 2008, spring 2009, spring 2011, spring 2012, fall 2012, spring 2013, spring 2014
Course Description:  This course will present the most important topics of graph theory through its applications and in a lively style, including some examples of proofs designed to strengthen mathematical techniques, and offer challenging opportunities to have fun while doing mathematical research. The course is intended to be self-contained, so no prior knowledge of graph theory is required.

HON 2380E, Nanotechnology and the Science of the Very Small
Substitution(s):  PHYS 1310 or PHYS 1320 or PHYS 4320
Professor(s):  G. Spencer
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2004, fall 2007
Course Description:  This course will introduce the vast array of technologies and materials in the realm of nanotechnology. The ability to control matter at these very small sizes, down to molecules and atoms, creates behavior never seen before. The resulting revolutionary technologies will affect all facets of 21st century life. This course will introduce students to nanotechnology both as a field of research and a career option. It is intended to bridge the gap between existing courses in solid state and materials physics on the one hand and semiconductors and microelectronics on the other. Additionally, it will open a new direction that is independent of microelectronics yet still has the explosive growth potential, both in jobs and value, of the early microelectronics industry.

HON 2380F, Introduction to Complementary/Alternative Medicine
Substitution(s):  Health administration elective
Professor(s):  E. Morrison
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2005, fall 2007, fall 2014
Course Description:  This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and the practices of complementary/alternative medicine and how they integrate with the traditional health care system. Emphasis is placed on historical, cultural, social, research and consumer aspects of complementary/alternative medicine. Specific modalities will be studied with emphasis on use for self-care. Implications for changes in health care environments and health care provider roles will also be analyzed. Complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) is a consumer-driven and rapidly growing area in health care that is becoming more recognized by mainstream medicine. This course is designed to provide undergraduate students who are engaged in any aspect of health care with a basic understanding of CAM and its practices, which is based on current literature.

HON 2380G, Relativity and Quantum Mechanics for Non-Science Majors
Substitution(s):  natural science (physics)
Professor(s):  H. Galloway
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2006
Course Description: Principles of quantum mechanics and relativity will be discussed and analyzed, including applications to theoretical problems and practical applications. Quantum mechanics is the science pertaining to small energies and sizes where the properties of matter cannot be described continuously. Relativity concerns the behavior of matter or energy when traveling at velocities approaching the speed of light. These theories took shape through the work of many scientists beginning in 1905 and are continued topics of research today. The effects of these theories on our daily lives will be investigated. The course is a two-hour lecture and a one-hour laboratory. The lab portion will allow students to perform classic experiments of modern physics.

HON 2390A, Ideal Societies
Substitution(s):  POSI 2320 or social science perspective or humanities or Group A history
Professor(s):  C. Rodriguez
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1990, fall 1995
Course Description:  This course explores man's quest for an ideal society from the ancient Greeks to modern times. The course examines the ideas, ideologies and utopian communities that this quest has produced.

HON 2390B, On Wisdom
Substitution(s):  elective
Professor(s):  M. Williamson
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1991, spring 1991, spring 1993
Course Description:  This course will be an examination of the concept of wisdom. Our study will begin with a cross-cultural study of proverbs and other literature. The class will develop its own taxonomy of the content of wise sayings and see if any universal elements exist.

HON 2390C, Chinese Communist Ideologies
Substitution(s):  Group A history
Professor(s):  J. Yick
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1992, fall 1996
Course Description:  This course will explore the Chinese Communist quest for an ideal society and the revolutionary and post-revolutionary ideologies that quest has produced from 1919 to present. The course will focus on the evolution of these ideologies and the political practice in consonance or disharmony with them.

HON 2390D, New and Old World Philosophy
Substitution(s):  PHIL 1305
Professor(s):  J. Gordon, V. Luizzi, A. McKinney
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1993, spring 1994, spring 1995, spring 1996, spring 1998, spring 1999, spring 2000, spring 2001, spring 2002, spring 2003, spring 2005, spring 2007, spring 2009, spring 2011, spring 2012
Course Description:  Is a discipline that focuses on rationality to the exclusion of other human traits ultimately self-defeating? To what extent does honoring the embodied, only partially rational, nature of our human existence both challenge and revitalize the practice of philosophy? Special attention will be paid along the way to the close ties philosophy has to a variety of other disciplines and to the significant contributions that writers, thinkers and artists not traditionally considered philosophers make to philosophy. Students will be especially encouraged to draw a connection between the course material and work they've done in their home discipline and encouraged as well to see themselves as contributors to the ongoing conversation of philosophy.

HON 2390E, Origins of the American Constitution
Substitution(s):  HIST 1310 or social science perspective or advanced history
Professor(s):  B. Liddle
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1991, spring 2002
Course Description:  Where did the ideas for our constitution originate? What political and philosophical ideas informed the framers of the constitution? Explore the classical and enlightenment ideas that shaped a nation, the origins of our form of government, and our efforts to confront and resolve important questions in our history.

HON 2390F, New England Roots of American Culture
Substitution(s):  ENG 2359
Professor(s):  S. Wilson
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1996, spring 2009
Course Description:  An examination, through reading of significant works as well as a trip to important sites in New England, of the roots of American culture as it was influenced by the Puritans and Transcendentalists.

HON 2390G, Philosophical Issues in Lewis Carroll's Writing
Substitution(s):  PHIL 1305
Professor(s):  G. Joy
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2001, fall 2002, fall 2004
Course Description:  This course in an introductory study of philosophy using the works of Lewis Carroll (C.L. Dodgson) as sources. Carroll is recognized for raising many interesting philosophical issues in his "Alice" books and his work in logic. Students will learn to appreciate the richness of Carroll's "children's" literature, to recognize philosophical questions that are implicit in literature, to evaluate different answers to philosophical questions, to develop their own answers to philosophical questions and to analyze arguments.

HON 2390H, Art and Artists: Catalysts of Social Change
Substitution(s):  ART 2313
Professor(s):  L. Kelsey-Jones
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2002, spring 2005, spring 2007
Course Description:  This course explores the catalytic role of art and artists at historically significant junctures. A focus on cultural brackets of the 20th century, Post-Impressionism and Post-Modernism lends perspective to contemporary (Post-Post-Modern) issues in both art and society. Understandings gained are used to generate personally relevant creative projects addressing social concerns. Students will have a chance to evaluate the effectiveness of artists' statements throughout history and to develop vision statements of their own. By taking creative risks within the contextual safety of the class, students will be better prepared to determine their future roles as active formulators of their own lives and as participants in society.

HON 2390I, Biography of the Book
Substitution(s):  ENG 2359
Professor(s):  K. Ledbetter
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2002
Course Description:  This writing-intensive seminar will explore through literary and scholarly readings the cultural history of printing, publishing, selling and reading books from the printing revolution to the present in England and America. Field trips to the Ransom Center in Austin will be organized to view the Gutenberg Bible and other rare books.

HON 2390J, History of American Science and Technology
Substitution(s):  HIST 1320
Professor(s):  J. McWilliams
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2002
Course Description:  How did the cotton gin change America forever? How did the United States achieve dominance in the space race? Explore the main developments in American science and technology from the colonial era to the present. Understand the connections between American culture and developments in our science and technology.
 
HON 2390K, An Intro to Arab Culture
Substitution(s):  GEO 3328, ANTH 3323, POSI 4326 or International Studies: Middle East/Africa
Professor(s):  A. Abunseir
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2008, fall 2010
Course Description:  What is the difference between Arab culture and Islam?  What is the relationship between the Arabic language and the Arabic culture?  How does Arabic culture differ from that of the U.S.? This introductory course will explore the Arab world.
 
HON 2390L, Intro to Islam
Substitutions: International Studies or counts toward the Minor in Religious Studies
Professor: A. Abunseir
Semester Offered: fall 2009
Course Description: This course will focus on educating students about basic history and cultural practicies related to Islam, the profit of Islam and Islam's holy book, The Koran. It will also focus on the relationship between the Arabic language, the Arabic culture and Islam so students will be able to distinguish between what is cultural and what is religious.
 
HON 2390M, Making Spaces
Substitution(s): Counts towards Honors Studies Minor
Professor(s): Awoniyi, Steve
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2010
Course Description:  Intensive exploration of the character of spaces we inhabit with a significant component of in-class discussion and analyses of images of works of preeminent architects/designers.  Another significant component includes extensive hands-on building of precedent-based analytical/study models to teach lessons about visualizing and creating space.
 
HON 2390L, Introduction to Islam
Substitution(s): International Studies, Religious Studies
Professor(s): A. Abunseir
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2009
Course Description: This course highlights the basic history and cultural practices related to Islam, the prophet of Islam and the Qur'an. This introduction will provide students with a basic understanding of the religion of Islam and its relationship to the Arab culture and language. 
 
HON 2391A, Communications and Modern Society
Substitution(s):  COMM 1310
Professor(s):  S. Beebe
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1992
Course Description:  This course explores the importance of communication in the modern world with a special emphasis upon examining the theory and practice of oral communications. Students will learn how to express themselves clearly and persuasively.

HON 2391B, The Role of Images in Mediating Reality
Substitution(s):  MC 2319
Professor(s):  Nolan, D.
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2007
Course Description:  What is the subconscious influence on our perceptions of reality and our behavior?  This course teaches the fundamentals of visual literacy by introducing students to visual literacy. Seeing is an avenue to higher-order thinking processes that will help students meet the professional, cultural and personal challenges of media.

HON 2391C, The Nature of Man: Philosophy Explorations in Film
Substitution(s):  advanced philosophy or PHIL 3301
Professor(s):  J. Gordon
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1990
Course Description:  An honors colloquium that will explore the interrelation between philosophy and film.

HON 2391D, French Revolution and the World
Substitution(s):  Group A history
Professor(s):  K. Margerison
Semester(s) Offered: fall 1990
Course Description:  The course will explore the nature and importance of the French Revolution to Europe and the World from 1789 to present.

HON 2391E, World Geographic Problems
Substitution(s):  elective
Professor(s):  B. Brown
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1994
Course Description:  Inquiry into major problems facing the global community from an interdisciplinary geographic perspective. Environmental, economic, social and political problems will be investigated with special emphasis identifying the underlying circumstances that are responsible for the problem.

HON 2391F, Baseball and the American Experience
Substitution:  HIST 1320
Professors:  T. Hindson, O. Renick
Semesters Offered:  fall 1993, fall 1996, fall 1999, fall 2002, fall 2005, fall 2007, fall 2008, fall 2009, fall 2010, fall 2011, fall 2012, fall 2013, fall 2014
Course Description:  This course, which is about baseball as culture, will introduce students to baseball’s place in American history and its role in contemporary society. Using baseball as a lens, students will gain insight into American life. The course will tie “The Cooperstown Symposium on Baseball and American Culture.” Students will submit a detailed abstract of their proposed course paper for review by a panel of three faculty members. The top two abstracts selected will be subsequently submitted when the symposium’s call for papers is issued late in the year. Should either abstract submitted to the symposium peer reviewers be accepted, the students’ course paper will serve as a draft manuscript in collaborating with the faculty members on the symposium presentation. In addition to the course paper, students will have a midterm and final examinations.

HON 2391G, America in the Sixties, The 1960s: A History of Movements and Ideas
Substitutions:  HIST 1320 or Group B history or social science perspective
Professors:  R. Brown, M. Brennan, R. Haas
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1990, fall 1991, fall 1992, fall 1993, fall 1994, spring 1995, spring 1996, spring 1998, spring 2000, spring 2001, spring 2002, spring 2005, spring 2007, fall 2013, fall 2014
Course Description:  After 40 years of brooding, analyzing, and arguing, the sixties remain as controversial and intriguing as they ever were. People sensed that something cataclysmic happened, but no one seems certain what that "something" was. Through the course of the semester, we will attempt to examine the 1960s both on its own terms and with the advantage of hindsight in order to discern what actually did happen and what, if anything, changed. We will examine the decade through its political framework, always realizing how intimately politics is intertwined with economics, society and culture. In the process, we will examine the various governmental foreign and domestic politics as well as the numerous grass-roots movements that challenged those policies. The obvious and subtle cultural changes will be addressed throughout.

HON 2391H, Perestroika and Eastern Europe
Substitution(s):  social science perspective
Professor(s):  J. Mogab
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1990
Course Description:  An examination of the changes taking place in the economics of the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland. This will be followed by an investigation of the implications of these changes in terms of the effects on economic relations between Eastern and Western Europe and the United States.

HON 2391I, Math Foundations of Science
Substitution(s):  elective
Professor(s):  M. Warshauer
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1990, fall 1991
Course Description:  This course introduces liberal arts students to the fundamental ideas in science and provides the mathematical background required to offer an in-depth treatment of topics not usually accessible to liberal arts students. Topics include: geometry, trigonometry, limits, derivatives, and integrals.

HON 2391J, Ecology of Politics in Latin America
Substitution(s):  social science perspective
Professor(s):  L. Cardenas
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1991
Course Description:  An interdisciplinary examination of factors that influence Latin American political development.

HON 2391K, Frontier Experience
Substitution(s):  humanities
Professor(s):  M. Busby
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1992, spring 1993
Course Description:  This course will concentrate on the effect of the frontier on 20th century Southwestern writers such as J. Frank Dobie, Katherine Anne Porter and Larry McMurtry.

HON 2391L, Race and Slavery in American Literature
Substitution(s):  humanities or advanced literature
Professor(s):  P. Leder
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1992, spring 1995
Course Description:  Students will read selected works by American writers from all historical periods who have dealt with the issues of slavery and/or relations between African and European Americans.

HON 2391M, American Protest Literature
Substitution(s):  humanities
Professor(s):  S. Wilson
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1994, fall 1998
Course Description:  An exploration of selected works of American literature that offer explicit criticism of the country's traditions and government policies. Through discussion of the texts, as well as works on the nature of protest itself, students will consider the place of art in a democratic society.

HON 2391N, The Intersection of Gender and Race in American History
Substitution(s):  Group B history or social science perspective
Professor(s):  V. Bynum
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1994
Course Description:  A study of the shifting constructions of gender and race in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. Students will analyze these interlocking systems of thought from the era of slavery to the 1991 Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas hearings.

HON 2391O, African-American Music and Musicians
Substitution(s):  elective
Professor(s):  N. Thomas
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1994, spring 1995
Course Description:  This course will explore African-American music from its earliest forms to present day. The aim of this course is to provide a varied background of experiences with black music through a combination of performance, reading, field trips and analytical comparisons. It will involve a thorough chronology of the development of black music.

HON 2391P, Spirituality and Religion: A Contemporary Global Perspective.
Substitutionss:  SW elective, humanties core (040/041), or international studies: Asian, ME/Af, Interam, or European focus
Professorss: Hawkins, C
Semesters Offered:  spring 2008, spring 2010, spring 2012, fall 2013
Course Description:  This course will examine spirituality and religion as a universal component of human life, explore the world’s major faith traditions, engage in critical inquiry of these traditions, investigate personal and cultural biases, and engage in focused self-awareness to assist students in expanding their global perspective.

HON 2391Q, African-American Protest Thought and Action
Substitution(s):  HIST 1320 or advanced history
Professor(s):  P. Hardman
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1995
Course Description:  This course offers an examination of a variety of African-American responses to slavery, segregation and disfranchisement as well as other political, legal and economic inequalities in American life. Writings of black authors provide pathways through passive and active protest against second-class citizenship.

HON 2391R, What is Thinking?
Substitution(s):  humanities
Professor(s):  T. Grimes
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1995
Course Description:  This course addresses the impulse or call to think through the impulse apparent in works of art, science, philosophy, mathematics, music, science fiction and Zen.

HON 2391T, The Beat Generation
Substitutions: English 2360 or 3336
Professor:  S. Wilson
Semesters Offered:  spring 1997, spring 2001, fall 2006, spring 2011, spring 2013
Course Description:  An overview of the Beat movement of the 1940s and 1950s that will explore the Beat’s influence on social norms, literature and politics. We will also consider the enduring influences this small group of social outcasts has on modern America.

HON 2391U, American Melodramas
Substitution(s):  humanities or advanced English
Professor(s):  C. Nelson
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1997
Course Description:  This course will examine melodramatic tropes across four media —novels, television soap operas, stage drama, and films — in order to explore how melodrama serves particular social functions and how it adapts as it moves from form to form.

HON 2391V, Nature and the Quest for Meaning
Substitutions:  ENG 1320 or ENG 2360 or humanities
Professor:  S. Hanson
Semesters Offered:  fall 1997, spring 2000, spring 2001, fall 2002, spring 2004, spring 2005, spring 2006, spring 2007, spring 2008, spring 2009, spring 2010, spring 2011, spring 2012, spring 2013, spring 2014
Course Description:  After exploring the origins of American nature writing, we will read and discuss the works of a number of contemporary authors. In the process, we will consider the ways in which human beings experience the natural world — as an object of study, as a reflection of themselves and as a lens through which they look for meaning in their lives.

HON 2391W, Introduction to Logic through Lewis Carroll
Substitution(s):  PHIL 1330 or PHIL 2330 or additional science for BAs
Professor(s):  G. Joy
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1998, spring 2000
Course Description:  The student will learn the nature and history of logic, learn to solve logical problems and puzzles, deduce conclusions, evaluate arguments, think critically, come to appreciate Carroll's interesting and instructive approach to logic, and come to appreciate the value of Carroll's contribution to the study of logic.

HON 2391X, Democracy in America
Substitution:  POSI 2320
Professor:  K. Grasso
Semesters Offered:  spring 2002, spring 2003, spring 2005, spring 2007, spring 2009, spring 2011, spring 2012, spring 2013
Course Description:  This course will explore Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville's seminal study of American social and political life, the nature and distinctive character of modern democratic societies, and the problems and perils these societies confront. Themes will include Tocqueville's account of the strengths and weaknesses of democratic governments; the impact of Puritanism on American culture; the role of religion in American public life; the impact of both slavery and racism on American life; sex roles in American society and the impact of democratic social structures on the family and the lives of women; the tension between capitalism and democracy; the effect of equality on American political culture; how and why democratic social conditions foster individualism, materialism, a cult of conformity to mass opinion and culture, and cause government to expand in scope and grow more centralized.

HON 3390A, Origins and Limitations of Science
Substitution(s):  substitutions unavailable
Professor(s):  B. Pelphrey
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1992
Course Description:  This course will explore the classical and medieval origins of scientific thought, examine the evolution of reason that culminates in modern scientific thought, and assess the limits of scientific method and theory.

HON 3390B, Literature and Music
Substitution(s):  humanities or advanced English
Professor(s):  P. Cohen
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1991
Course Description:  The course will examine the various types of interaction between literature and music including literary works that use musical structures, musical works that use literary structures, and works combining elements of both.

HON 3390C, Renaissance Concepts of Humanity
Substitution(s):  ENG 2330 or ENG 3353 or humanities or advanced English
Professor(s):  D. Lochman
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1991, spring 1992, spring 1995, fall 2002
Course Description:  Are we primarily thinking or feeling creatures?  The course examines philosophical, theological and humanist responses to this question as it pertains to politics, gender identity and concepts of European and non-European cultures.

HON 3390D, Nature of Society: World Legal Traditions
Substitution(s):  advanced elective
Professor(s):  P. Cagniart
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1992
Course Description:  Introduction to the nature and history of the different legal traditions existing in the world.

HON 3390E, Medieval Women Writers
Substitution(s):  humanities or advanced English
Professor(s):  J. Laird
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1993, fall 1994
Course Description:  A study of the lives and texts of women writers in the Middle Ages (1000-1500) with a focus on both their feminine and medieval perspective.

HON 3390F, Art and Humanities
Substitution(s):  visual and performing arts
Professor(s):  B. Neely
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1993, fall 1994, fall 1995, fall 1996, fall 1997, fall 1998, spring 1999
Course Description:  The course explores the importance of arts and humanities as they have contributed to the development of world culture and modern society.

HON 3390G, Comedy and the Human Predicament
Substitution(s):  humanities or advanced English
Professor(s):  T. Grimes
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1994
Course Description:  This course will examine the function of the comic imagination as a form of social commentary, protest, a release from anxiety, and an attempt by man to define his identity and the nature of existence in a baffling, often incomprehensible world.

HON 3390H, The Problem of Evil
Substitutions:  Advanced Philosophy or counts toward the minor in Religious Studies
Professor:  P. Hutcheson
Semesters Offered:  fall 1995, fall 1996, fall 1997, fall 1999, fall 2001, spring 2005, spring 2007, spring 2009, spring 2011, spring 2013
Course Description:  Is it reasonable to believe that there is an all-knowing, all-powerful, and all-good God, despite the appearance of pointless evil? The course consists of attempts to answer this question with rational arguments.

HON 3390I, Images of Death
Substitution(s):  humanities or advanced English
Professor(s):  J. Laird
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1996, spring 1997
Course Description:  Representations of death from the Middle Ages to the present offers students an opportunity to study verbal and visual portraits of death and examine them in terms of the individual and communal impulses that produced them.

HON 3390J, Don Quixote and the Birth of the Modern Novel
Substitution(s):  ENG 2330 or humanities or SPAN 3301 or medieval and Renaissance studies minor
Professor(s):  C. Jaffe
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1997, fall 2003, fall 2006, fall 2009
Course Description:  What is truly modern about the novel, Don Quixote? How does it compare to the historical context of 17th century Europe? Students will examine the novel to uncover the lasting influence of Cervantes' groundbreaking work.

HON 3390K, Modern Democracy and its Enemies
Substitution(s):  PHIL 1320, advanced philosophy, advanced political science, or second half of international relations focus
Professor(s):  J. Gordon, R. Raphael
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2005, fall 2006, fall 2009, fall 2012
Course Description:  The focus of the course will be contemporary democracy and the threats, internal and external, that challenge its health and continued existence. The course will take a global and interdisciplinary approach to the study of democracy and its enemies.

HON 3390L, Film Analysis: A mini-term in Paris
Substitution(s):  ARTH 4322 or FR 4304 or ENG 3307 or European studies focus course
Professor(s):  C. Martin
Semester(s) Offered:  summer 2005
Course Description:  This course will be devoted to film analysis using an analytical method to design a written analysis centered around a single genre or director. The course is taught abroad during the summer mini-session.

HON 3390M, Comedy: Form and Function, Frivolity and Filth
Substitution(s):  ENG 2340 or advanced English
Professor(s):  P. Leder
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2002
Course Description:  How do humor and comedy represent modes of thought?  This seminar will examine a range of comic forms: plays, fiction, film and performance from literary, philosophical, and social science perspectives. (Prerequisite: English 1310 and 1320)

HON 3390N, The Avant-garde
Substitution(s):  ENG 2340 or Group C English
Professor(s):  P. Cohen
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2002
Course Description:  How does studying the avant-garde in the arts contribute to the understanding of 20th century culture?  The course considers the nature and practice of the avant-garde in literature, painting, music and film from the Dada movement to the present.

HON 3390O, Anatomy of Hatred in Life and Literature
Substitution(s):  PSY 3331 or PSY 3333 or social science perspective
Professor(s):  C. Frost, R. Osborne
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2002
Course Description:  Are we born with the tendency to hate, or must we learn to hate?  Whom do we hate when we hate?  Explore the psychological, sociological, political and religious dimensions of hatred in life and literature through the voices of Elie Wiesel, Nelson Mandela, Maya Angelou and others.  This seminar class approaches learning as a process of participation and exposure.  It assumes that hearing oneself is itself a learning experience, and that hearing the responses of peers to what we say can be a way of sharpening our self-perceptions as well as a way of dealing responsibly with a particular subject matter.

HON 3390P, Hollywood Amnesia
Substitutions:  Sophomore Literature, Humanities, Advanced English Group D, or Media Studies minor
Professor:  R. Bell-Metereau
Semesters Offered:  fall 2005, spring 2009, spring 2013
Course Description:  This course offers a historical overview of a topic that appears with increasing frequency in films of the last decade — various forms of memory loss. We will explore how films about various forms of amnesia satisfy a viewer’s desire to come to terms with memory loss in an aging society and how the project of creating a state of constant cultural amnesia satisfies the needs of larger governmental and economic engines. (Prerequisites: English 1310 and 1320)

HON 3390Q, Mechanical Puzzles: History, Logic, Invention, Construction and Solution
Substitution(s):  PHIL 2330 or advanced philosophy
Professor(s):  G. Joy
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2003, spring 2005, fall 2006
Course Description:  This course is an interdisciplinary study of mechanical puzzles —tangible-object puzzles like knots/wire disentanglement, burrs, sliding blocks, pentominoes, peg solitaire and Rubik's cubes. Students will construct, solve and possibly invent puzzles. Themes are the history of puzzles and the psychology of problem (puzzle) solving.

HON 3390R, Your Brain on God: Neurotheology and Mystical
Substitution(s):  PSY 3321 or religious studies minor
Professor(s):  L. Flores
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2003
Course Description:  How does neurotheology attempt to explain religious and mystical phenomena? Explore religious, philosophical and scientific perspectives regarding mystical experiences. Readings and discussions touch on how we understand consciousness and our relationship with God and other supernatural beings/experiences.

HON 3390S, Christ, Satan and the Sacred
Substitution(s):  ENG 2340 or ENG 3325 or religious studies minor
Professor(s):  T. Grimes
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2003
Course Description:  How do the Gnostic Gospels offer new impressions of Christ? What are the origins of Satan? Examine the evolution of the sacred in the West using religious scholarship, anthropology and Russian literature.

HON 3390T, Frederico Garcia Lorca: Politics and Passion
Substitution(s):  HIST 3311, ENG 3343, ENG 2340, SPAN 3370, SPAN 4380 or SPAN 3302
Professor(s):  S. Ugalde
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2003
Course Description:  How do the life and works of this 20th century Spanish playwright and poet reflect Spanish history, Andalusian folklore, gender and society, and literary styles? Themes will include the Spanish Civil War, gypsies and flamenco music, surrealism, and oral poetic traditions.

HON 3390U, Ancient Greece in Homer’s Epics
Substitution(s):  ENG 2330, ENG 3341, HIST 4303, REL 3366 or advanced philosophy
Professor(s):  R. Raphael
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2004
Course Description:  What are the sources of religion, philosophy, visual arts and other literature in the Homeric epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey? Prominent themes in the course include warfare and homecoming, humans and gods, heroic ethics, and the concept of a classic.

HON 3390V, Freud's Vienna
Substitution(s):  HIST 4318 or PSY 4391
Professor(s):  M. Menninger, T. Hulsey
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2003
Course Description:  What were the social, cultural, and political tensions in Vienna at the turn of last century? Themes include the works of Sigmund Freud, the urban experience, nationalism and anti-Semitism, and explorations of sexuality in social science, law and arts. As of Spring 2012, HON 3390V no longer substitutes for PSY 4391.

HON 3390W, Philosophy of History
Substitution(s):  POSI 3332 or POSI 3333 or Group A History or advanced philosophy
Professor(s):  P. Cagniart
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2004, fall 2007
Course Description:  Speculative philosophy of history refers to the "grand theories" of history. It is concerned with the broad issue of the overall significance of the history of mankind, with the general laws of historical development, and/or with a comprehensive explanation of the nature of the historical process. It is related to the question of progress (conscious or unconscious) of historical events since the origins of humankind and to the idea that history has an ultimate purpose.

HON 3390X, Writing for Film: European Cinema of the 1960's
Substitution(s):  ENG 3316 or ENG 3329 or advanced French or international studies: European or media studies minor
Professor(s):  C. Martin, U. Bach, A. Schaefer
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2004, spring 2009, spring 2014
Course Description:  Students will examine the vision of the United States that European filmmakers developed during the unification period, analyzing the narrative techniques and stereotypical characters transposed from American film noir to European free cinema. Topics will include the American myth, the figure of the star, the status of the foreigner and the identity politics supported by film production. Students will study film through the reverse perspective of the other, looking back on American myth as it is represented in film. Students will analyze how British, Danish, German, French, Italian and Spanish productions from the 1960 to the 2000, invariably though differently, refer to Hollywood Golden Age.

HON 3390Y, Theory of Language: Language, Mind and the Making of Reality
Substitution(s):  FR 4390 or SPAN 4390 or GER 4390 or LING 4390 or Group D English
Professor(s):  A. Gragera
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2004, fall 2014
Course Description:  This course is designed for students who want to gain an understanding of psycholinguistics. Psycholinguistics provides insights into human cognition through the study of syntax, semantics and pragmatics. The study of language development in first and second language acquisition seeks to find universal principles that make human knowledge possible. The course will use lecture format as well as discussion groups. The students will be asked to solve linguistics problems related to each chapter in which the course is divided, as well as to write brief essays summarizing the scope of inquiry of the different fields of research within the field of linguistics and their respective state of the art.

HON 3390Z, Finding Common Ground in Teaching and Learning
Substitution(s):  CI 3310
Professor(s):  J. Leavell
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2005
Course Description:  This course explores the reciprocal relationships in teaching and learning through a focus on curriculum, the learning process, instruction materials and assessment. Increased understanding and communication between teachers and learners with multiple cultural differences is a vital global need addressed through this course.

HON 3391, Race and Ethnicity Cross Culture
Substitution(s):  advanced anthropology
Professor(s):  R. Warms
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1997
Course Description:  Race and ethnicity are social phenomena that influence group relations as well as personal identity in many areas of the world. This course introduces students to the history of these concepts and the varied approaches that have been used to understand racial and ethnic phenomena. The course is rooted in anthropology but will use resources from other disciplines.

HON 3391, Latin American Nobel Prizes
Substitution(s):  SPAN 3306 or SPAN 4390 or humanities
Professor(s):  S. Ugalde
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1997, spring 2000
Course Description:  An interdisciplinary course on Latin America with an emphasis on great works of literature by Nobel Prize winners. Literary texts will serve as a basis for considering the region from a variety of perspectives: history, society, politics, geography, film and art.

HON 3391A, Science Fiction and Society
Substitution(s):  ENG 2360 or advanced English
Professor(s):  P. Deduck-Evans
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1991, spring 1993, fall 1994, fall 1995, fall 1996, spring 1999, fall 2000, spring 2002, spring 2004, spring 2008, spring 2010
Course Description:  What does science fiction tell us about ourselves, about our fears and hopes for the future? By examining the literary and philosophical value of the growing body of science fiction, students will gain valuable insights into the human condition, humankind's relation to (and fears of) science and technology, possible futures and contemporary culture.

HON 3391B, The Shaping of the Modern Mind
Substitutions:  Advanced Philosophy or advanced Psychology (for semesters prior to fall 2011, contact honors@txstate.edu for clarification).
Professors:  D. Stimmel, P. Hutcheson, T. Hulsey
Semesters Offered:  spring 1991, spring 1993, spring 1994, spring 1995, spring 1997, spring 1998, spring 1999, spring 2004, fall 2011, spring 2013
Course Description:  How does the neurobiological composition of your brain affect your beliefs? This course will examine modern theories concerning psychological, biological and philosophical origins of cognition.

HON 3391C, Health Effects of Nuclear Age
Substitution(s):  advanced elective
Professor(s):  C. Johnson
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1991
Course Description:  The course explores both the challenges and opportunities presented by scientific and technological development of nuclear energy for both military and peaceful purposes. Both ethical and practical problems have been raised by this new technology.

HON 3391D, Latin American Revolutions
Substitution(s):  social science perspective or Group A history
Professor(s):  W. Anderson
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1990
Course Description:  This course is a historical treatment of the three major revolutions in Latin America in the 20th century, in Mexico, Cuba and Central America. Consideration is also given to the phenomenon of revolution in human history, as well as a general overview of Latin American history prior to the 20th century.

HON 3391E, International Humanitarian Aid
Substitution(s):  social science perspective or advanced political science
Professor(s):  R. Gorman
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1991
Course Description:  When dealing with international humanitarian problems, we must be prepared to engage in both careful reflection and prescription for action. Nowhere is the need for reflection and action more clear than in the study of international humanitarian aid where action without contemplation and contemplation without action lead to virtually the same unnecessary result: death for the victims of famine, persecution, and disaster. This course will attempt to show how a conscientious international community can avoid these dire consequences, and at the same time ennoble a species that is unfortunately capable of great evil, but also of great good.

HON 3391F, Science and Society in the United States
Substitution(s):  social science perspective or Group B history
Professor(s):  L. Zanine
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1990
Course Description:  An interdisciplinary examination of the relationship between science and American social values and thought; how scientists’ ideas and values have affected our American culture (literature, religion, philosophy) and how distinctively American characteristics have affected the development of our scientific community.

HON 3391G, The Information Age
Substitution(s):  substitutions unavailable
Professor(s):  H. Sellars
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1990
Course Description:  COURSE DESCRIPTION UNAVAILABLE

HON 3391H, Humanist and Computer
Substitution(s):  advanced elective
Professor(s):  E. Swinney, C. Johnson
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1990, fall 1991, fall 1992, spring 1992, spring 1995
Course Description:  Advanced topics to be introduced include communication through international research networks, bibliographic and full-text searches, and legal database searches.

HON 3391I, Search for Artificial Intelligence
Substitution(s):  advanced elective
Professor(s):  G. Joy
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1990
Course Description:  COURSE DESCRIPTION UNAVAILABLE

HON 3391J, Science: War, Religion and Race
Substitution(s):  advanced elective
Professor(s):  G. Joy
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1990
Course Description:  The course will explore science and its relationships with war, religion and race. In studying science and its influence upon these other fields of human endeavor, students will examine its goals and its limits in addressing contemporary problems.

HON 3391K, Law and Literature
Substitution(s):  humanities
Professor(s):  J. Bible
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1990, spring 1991, spring 1993, fall 1995, spring 1996
Course Description:  This course will examine the process of justice as it has evolved in the West by analyzing literary works dealing with major legal conflicts. The main focus will be on how writers present values in works of fiction.

HON 3391L, Philosophical Explorations in Film
Substitution(s):  advanced philosophy or media studies minor. (As of spring 2010 this course also counts for PHIL 1305 under special arrangement to complete a series of critical thinking exercises provided by the professor.)
Professor(s):  J. Gordon, A. McKinney
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1991, spring 1993, spring 1994, spring 1995, spring 1996, spring 1997, spring 1998, spring 1999, spring 2000, spring 2001, spring 2002, spring 2003, spring 2004, spring 2008, spring 2010
Course Description:  What does it mean to say that a film is powerful? How do films evoke emotions? Learn the language and techniques that filmmakers use to explore self-deception and love. Learn to use the philosophical insights of Kant, Sartre, Rich and Freud in the films of Deren, Lee, Fincher and others.

HON 3391M, Math and Modern Science
Substitution(s):  additional science for BAs
Professor(s):  M. Warshauer
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1991
Course Description:  An honors colloquium exploring some of the philosophical and ethical problems in the realms of modern science, technology, urbanism and social and cultural change.

HON 3391N, The United States and Mexico
Substitution(s):  social science perspective
Professor(s):  G. Andrews
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1992
Course Description:  Examines the dynamic interplay of economic and political forces that have shaped diplomatic relations between Mexico and the United States from 1821 to present.

HON 3391O, The New Russian States
Substitution(s):  advanced political science or Group A History or IS 4380, Capstone
Professor(s):  A. Leder
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1992, fall 1993, fall 1994
Course Description:  This course will expose students to the persistence of religious, ethnic and cultural differences, using the Soviet successor states as models for the continuing significance of these phenomena. It will explore the problems of religion, nationalism and cultural diversity as these affect the prospects of the Russian Confederation.

HON 3391P, Apocalyptic Imagination
Substitution(s):  advanced English or humanities
Professor(s):  T. Grimes
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1993
Course Description:  An honors colloquium exploring historical and literary visions of apocalypse, with emphasis given to the end of millennia.

HON 3391Q, Chicano Literature
Substitution(s):  advanced Spanish or humanities
Professor(s):  S. Ugalde
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1993, spring 1994
Course Description:  A study of poetic language, feminism and ethnicity in the works of Chicana poets.

HON 3391R, The Prisoner
Substitutions:  Media Studies minor or IS: International Relations, ME/African, Interamerican, European, or Asian Focus
Professor(s):  B. Liddle
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1993, spring 1994, spring 1995, spring 1996, spring 1997, spring 1998, spring 2000, spring 2001, spring 2007, spring 2008, spring 2010, spring 2012, spring 2013
Course Description:  Explore the themes of individualism, isolation and social control as ingredients of both modern society and particular elements in the British TV series, The Prisoner, which appeared in 17 episodes during 1968. Examine struggles between society's need to organize and control individuals, and the individual's need to understand his or her environment to exercise personal autonomy.

HON 3391S, Voices in French Cinema
Substitution(s):  FR 4304 or media studies minor
Professor(s):  J. Forrest
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1993, spring 1994, fall 1996, fall 1999, spring 2004
Course Description:  How did French cinema draw from Hollywood to define itself against Hollywood styles and traditions? Study the cinematic styles, genres, periods, directors, and ethnic and women's contributions to French film.

HON 3391T, The Japanese Psyche
Substitution(s):  social science perspective or PSY 3314 or PSY 4390
Professor(s):  S. Fling
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1993, fall 1994, fall 1995, fall 2000, fall 2001, fall 2003, fall 2007
Course Description:  What can people of the United States learn from Japanese society? What role do the arts, tea ceremonies, cooking, education and gender roles play in the Japanese psyche? What insights can be gained for applications in living, working and relating cross-culturally?

HON 3391U, Faith and Doubt in Western Literature
Substitution(s):  humanities
Professor(s):  E. Skerpan
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1993
Course Description:  The course will examine Western literary treatments of religious faith, showing how authors’ approaches to belief, faith and spirituality changed over time. It covers two large historical periods: from the Middle Ages to around 1800 and after the 1800s.

HON 3391V, Contemporary Native American Women Writers
Substitution(s):  humanities
Professor(s):  R. Cohen
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1994, spring 1996
Course Description:  Fiction and poetry by contemporary Native American writers examined in light of tribal cultures, encounters and conflicts with the dominant white, European culture, and the influence of the literary canon of the dominant culture. This course will also compare and contrast the role of women in tribal cultures to their role in the dominant culture and consider the significance of gender in works studied.
 
HON 3391W, Service Learning Abroad
Substitution(s):  Honors
Professor(s):  A. Gragera, M. DiMauro-Jackson
Semester(s) Offered:  Projected Summer 2015
Course Description:  This study abroad course will center on students' experiences volunteering with non-profit or government institutions abroad. Discussions and written assignments will provide opportunities to analyze the volunteer experiences. Field trips will provide cultural components to add to the discussiona nd written assignments.

HON 3391X, Representing Technological Change
Substitution(s):  humanities or advanced English
Professor(s):  M. Hansen
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1996
Course Description:  In this course, scientific paradigms, myth, fiction, law and film will be used to investigate the impact of technology on our lives. We will critically explore the relationships between science and myth, asking whether science is sufficient to represent technological change, or if, perhaps, some form of cultural representation is necessary to capture the experiential impact of technology on our lives.

HON 3391Y, Postmodernism
Substitution(s):  Humanities or advanced Literature
Professor(s):  P. Cohen
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1996
Course Description:  A thoroughly interdisciplinary study of postmodernism, as manifested in recent philosophy, social theory, literature, art, music, architecture and technology.

HON 3391Z, Ethnic Composition in Texas
Substitution(s):  social science perspective or advanced geography
Professor(s):  B. Brown
semester(s) Offered:  spring 1997
Course Description:  Spatial and temporal trends of the changing ethnic composition in Texas will be investigated by identifying and reading relevant sources and through weekly discussions. Political, economic and environmental impacts of these trends also will be examined.

HON 3392A, Gender and Fiction
Substitution(s):  humanities or advanced English or women's studies minor
Professor(s):  P. Leder
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1997
Course Description:  Will study fiction by both men and women to consider how (or whether) gender identity manifests itself in writing. We will consider texts written in English from the 18th century to the present, including not only works regarded as especially "masculine" or "feminine" but also works written from the perspective of the "other" gender.

HON 3392B, Religion, Social Science and the Quest for Meaning
Substitution(s):  PSY 4391 or Capstone or advanced psychology or advanced philosophy or religious studies minor
Professor(s):  C. Frost
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1997, fall 2000, fall 2003
Course Description:  Can a person dedicated to intellectual truth adhere to a tradition of faith? What are the dangers inherent in religious individuals who reject the intellect in religious matters? Students will consider the human quest for meaning to provide a context within which to examine and answer these questions. As of Spring 2012, HON 3390V no longer substitutes for PSY 4391.

HON 3392C, Medieval Pilgrimage Literature
Substitution(s):  humanities or Advanced English Group A or medieval and Renaissance studies minor or SP 3301 or SP 4390
Professor(s):  S. Morrison, S. Johnson
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1998, spring 2000, spring 2007
Course Description:  This seminar examines three major works of late 14th and early 15th century England: William Langland's Piers Plowman, Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, and The Book of Margery Kempe. They all allude to pilgrimage in terms of metaphor, plot, structuring agent, theme or actual experience. Students will be concerned with theological, historical, cultural and social contexts for the literature. Other issues of major importance to be explored are power — political, religious, sexual — and gender.

HON 3392D, War and the News Media
Substitution(s):  MC 3355 or MC 4302 or MC 4305 or MC 4356 or MC 4382A or MC 4382
Professor(s):  G. Rice
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1997, Spring 1999, fall 2000
Course Description:  Critically analyze the interaction of the news media, the government and the military from the Vietnam War through Desert Storm. Journalists and their coverage of wars are placed in a historical perspective. A key part of the course work includes oral interviews with war correspondents and veterans.

HON 3392E, Silver Screen Texas
Substitution(s):  HIST 3372 or Group B History or Southwestern studies minor or U.S. ethnic studies minor or media studies minor
Professor(s):  F. de la Teja
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1997, fall 1999, spring 2003
Course Description:  The course explores Texas history, culture and identity through the popular medium of theatrical films. Students are asked to learn about and analyze the relationship between the image of Texas in popular culture and the historical reality of the subject matter. Major Texas themes include race relations, westward expansion, the cattle-cotton-oil complex and the Depression.

HON 3392F, God
Substitution(s):  advanced philosophy or religious studies minor
Professor(s):  P. Hutcheson
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1998
Course Description:  Can an all-powerful God make a stone that is too heavy for God to lift? Can an all-knowing God know for sure what people will do before they do it? Can belief in an all-knowing God be squared with belief in persons having free will? What are the meanings of omnipotence, omniscience and other divine characteristics, and are they consistent? Can God be known to exist without arguments? The course will address these and related questions.

HON 3392G, Gender, Family and the Horror Narrative
Substitution(s):  humanities or ENG 3388 or media studies minor or women's studies minor
Professor(s):  C. Nelson
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1998
Course Description:  This course will examine cultural anxieties about gender and family roles as played out in horror novels, horror films and horrific short stories.

HON 3392H, Sense of the American South
Substitution(s):  humanities or advanced English
Professor(s):  J. Blair
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1998, fall 1999, fall 2001
Course Description:  This course will examine the literature, culture and history of the American South from Thomas Jefferson and Jeffersonian Idealism to the present and its effect in American culture as a whole.

HON 3392I, Rock, Roll & Rebellion
Substitution(s):  MC 3329 or MC 3355
Professor(s):  D. Rogers
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1998
Course Description:  A definitive study of how the music of the 1950s to the 1970s reflected the social changes of the baby boomer decade.
 
HON 3392J, Statistics and Shakespeare: Quantifying the Unquantifiable
Substitution(s): MATH 2328, SOCI 3307 or Advanced Theatre
Professor(s): S. Zinkgraf
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2011
Course Description: Introductory statistics course, applies descriptive statistics, probability and inferential statistics to the study of Shakespeare.
 
HON 3392K, Cybermarketing
Substitution(s):  MKT 3343
Professor(s):  N. Natesan
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1998
Course Description:  This course is a study of the marketing process on the World Wide Web (WWW). It examines Cybermarketing in the light of social, cultural, political, legal, economic, technological and demographic factors.

HON 3392L, The Idea of the Grotesque
Substitution(s):  humanities or advanced English
Professor(s):  R. Randolph
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1998
Course Description:  This course will investigate the idea of the grotesque in American literature, using five novels and three films.

HON 3392O, God as Literary Character
Substitution(s):  humanities or advanced English
Professor(s):  T. Grimes
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1999
Course Description:  This course examines the Bible as literature, but from the perspective of writers and biographers. How God functions as a "character" in the text and the work's profound influence on western literary writers will be explored.

HON 3392P, Technology, Gender and Bodies in Film
Substitution(s):  ENG 2360 or advanced English or media studies minor
Professor(s):  R. Bell-Metereau
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1999, fall 2000, fall 2002, spring 2004
Course Description:  How are gender, technology and body images depicted in film? This course examines the connection between film portrayals of gender and perceptions of the body of the "Other", as mediated through technology.

HON 3392Q, Forensic Scientific Evidence
Substitution(s):  substitutions unavailable
Professor(s):  D. Spencer
Semester(s) Offered:  not since 1990
Course Description:  A study of the use of scientific evidence and expert witnesses in criminal prosecutions, including issues of evidence gathering, testing, analysis, admissibility and presentation in court.

HON 3392R, Teaching Poetry to Children
Substitutions:  Advanced English Group D or RDG 3320
Professor:  D. McCabe
Semesters Offered:  fall 1998, spring 2000, spring 2001, spring 2005, fall 2010, fall 2011, fall 2012, fall 2013
Course Description:  Students will study the work of poet Kenneth Koch to learn how to teach children to read and write poetry. Using classical poetry and a "poetry idea," students will teach poetry to children in elementary and middle school classes, prepare books of the children's original poems, and hold children's poetry readings in the classrooms and in the library. Read about this course on the Texas State blog.

HON 3392S, Anthropology of Violence and Terror
Substitution(s):  Social science perspective or advanced anthropology
Professor(s):  R. Warms
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1999, spring 2001, spring 2003
Course Description:  This course will examine the biological and social aspects of violence from the perspective of anthropology. Students will examine specific incidents of violence and terror in various cultural settings and attempt to draw theoretical conclusions about the place of violence and terror in human society.

HON 3392U, Elite and Power in the United States
Substitution(s):  social science perspective or POSI 2320
Professor(s):  K. Folse
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 1999
Course Description:  This course will examine the theories and documentation of elite and pluralist theory models of government control. The backdrop for our learning experience will be the classical social and political theoretical works before the turn of the century. We will examine the capitalist structure and the social and political implications of the globalization of the economy including concerns of a meritocratic society.

HON 3392V, Elementary Number Theory
Substitutions:  MATH 1315 or MATH 3330
Professors:  M. Warshauer, T. McCabe
Semesters Offered:  fall 1997, fall 1998, fall 1999, fall 1999, fall 2000, fall 2001, fall 2003, fall 2004, fall 2005, fall 2006, fall 2007, fall 2008, fall 2009, fall 2010, fall 2012, fall 2013, fall 2014
Course Description:  Elementary Number Theory allows students at different levels of mathematical maturity to participate and work together. Students will study simple ideas about the integers, where they already have a well-developed intuition. To paraphrase David Gries (Science of Programming), one should never take basic principles for granted, for it is only through careful application of simple fundamental ideas that progress is made. The division algorithm is studied in detail, and is seen to have far-reaching consequences throughout the course; it yields Euclid’s algorithm and the solution to linear Diophantine equations. Properties of divisibility also lead naturally to modular arithmetic and related questions about quadratic forms. Students explore quadratic residues, culminating w/ Legendre Symbols and a development of the Law of Quadratic Reciprocity. 
 
For information on the Mathworks Math Explorations curriculum, which will be used in middle schools as of 2014-2015 school year, see this link.
 
 
HON 3392W, Art, Society and Urban Space in Modern Barcelona and Madrid
Substitution(s):  SPAN 3370 or SPAN 4302 or humanities
Professor(s):  A. Candau
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 1999
Course Description:  The course will review the connections between the arts, politics and society of modern Spain through the study of texts and movies that concentrate on the two political and cultural capitals of Madrid and Barcelona. These two cities are the premier examples of the industrialization process of Spain and both were artistic centers during the first quarter of the 20th century. The class will explore also the nationalist tensions between Catalonia and Spain's center and the struggles for political and linguistic autonomy.

HON 3392X, The Contemporary African Novel
Substitutions:  Humanities or Advanced English Group C
Professor:  E. Holt
Semesters Offered:  fall 1999, fall 2001, spring 2013
Course Description:  Novels by contemporary African writers from western and southern Africa will be read and discussed. The class will also study the effects of colonialism on traditional African cultures. Students will consider problems of language in the African novel.

HON 3392Y, Immortality
Substitution(s):  advanced philosophy or religious studies minor
Professor(s):  P. Hutcheson
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2000, fall 2002, spring 2010, spring 2012, spring 2014
Course Description:  What are the various concepts of life after death?  Is it reasonable to believe in life after death?  This course attempts to answer theses questions with rational arguments.

HON 3392Z, Ethnic Drama in the United States
Substitution(s):  TH 4360 or Group B English
Professor(s):  S. Mayo
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2005
Course Description:  This course will meet the needs of students seeking to enhance their study of literature with greater understanding of ethnic theatre texts and performance. Although some literature survey classes and theatre history classes include one or two plays, a survey that focuses on the ethnic plays has the potential to do a more thorough job in exposing students to the literary contributions of minorities to American theatre. The Ethnic Drama course is an ideal complement to the others as it can concentrate on the works so that the traditions and cultures come to the fore. Students will see similarities and differences in approaches to ethnic drama, and their similar historical influences. Reading the literature of the ethnic theatre will also deepen understanding of and promote comparisons to the non-minority plays and theatrical traditions.

HON 3393A, Intuition: The Other Way of Knowing
Substitution(s):  social science perspective
Professor(s):  J. Garcia
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2000
Course Description:  COURSE DESCRIPTION UNAVAILABLE

HON 3393B, Quest for Order and Justice
Substitution(s):  POSI 2320
Professor(s):  K. Ward
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2000, spring 2003
Course Description:  How does law contribute to social order and justice? What occurs when these two ends conflict? How do they influence the development of legal doctrine and practice? The course explores the nature of law through legal texts, religious texts and literature.

HON 3393C, Indians in North American Culture
Substitution(s): Humanities or ethnic studies minor
Professor(s):  T. Rosenberg, R. Cohen
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2000
Course Description:  Thomas King's novel, Green Grass, Running Water, is the starting point for this course, which examines how the Indian is represented in U.S. and Canadian literature, history and popular culture. Students will read and discuss a variety of texts: literary, historical and visual (television and film). Discussion will be aided by accompanying critical/scholarly articles.

HON 3393D, Aliens, Hipsters and (In)visible Men and Women: Cold War America
Substitution(s):  humanities or advanced English or media studies minor
Professor(s):  V. Smith
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2005
Course Description:  This course focuses on the fears and dreams of Cold War America as seen in popular culture (film and TV) and literary texts. In particular, we will look at the fear of alien “others” (from Communists to space creatures) and the dream of establishing a less conformist and more racially and sexually just America. (Prerequisites: English 1310 and 1320).

HON 3393E, History of Ethics: Ancient to Medieval
Substitution(s):  POSI 2320 or advanced political science or HIST 2310 or medieval and Renaissance studies minor
Professor(s):  R. Gorman
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2000, fall 2003, fall 2006
Course Description:  What do Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, Machiavelli and Luther have to say about ethical thought? This course explores the connections among ethics, political theory, law, philosophy, literature and history as they relate to ethical ideas and principles.

HON 3393F, Communication and Consumer Culture
Substitutions:  COMM 1310 or advanced speech communication
Professor:  R. Mandziuk
Semesters Offered:  fall 2000, fall 2001, fall 2002, fall 2003, fall 2004, fall 2007, fall 2009, fall 2011, fall 2013
Course Description:  Communication is a complex human process, enveloping perceptions, values, self-concepts, meanings and behaviors. All of these elements are rooted in the cultural context. Indeed, we are shaped and defined by the contemporary culture into which we are born more than we may realize; the culture gives us images to model, goals to aspire to, values to espouse, and tells us who we are or who we should want to be. To understand our contemporary culture and its influence on communication, this course takes a historical step backward to look at its roots. At the turn of the 20th century, roughly 1880-1930, we can find the beginnings of so much of what we now take for granted: social patterns, mass media, modern technologies, interpersonal perceptions and world views. This period of time initiated the cultural fabric that we are still enmeshed in: consumerism.

HON 3393G, Female Self and Society: 20th Century Latin American Women Writers
Substitution(s):  SPAN 3306 or SPAN 3371 or SPAN 4380 or women's studies minor or advanced English or international studies - Interamerican studies
Professor(s):  A. Cristina Pinto-Bailey
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2005
Course Description:  This course presents a historical overview of women’s writing in Latin America, from the early 1900s to present. It discusses the work of some of the most important Latin American female writers, including Victoria Ocampo (Argentina), Magda Portal (Peru), Clarice Lispector (Brazil), Elena Poniatowska (Mexico), and Gloria Anzaldúa (Mexico, U.S.), by focusing on some key textual and extra-textual aspects of their writing. All literary genres will be studied — poetry, narrative fiction, essay and drama.

HON 3393H, Enhancing Human Performance
Substitution(s):  PE 3323
Professor(s):  L. Lloyd
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2001
Course Description:  Application of sports medicine, sports nutrition, exercise science and physical activity in selected clinical, competitive sport and pathological situations for enhancing therapeutic, functional, educational and ergogenic benefits.

HON 3393I, Creating Poetry: Anglo-Saxon Innovation and Modern Tradition
Substitution(s):  ENG 2330 or ENG 2340 or advanced English or medieval and Renaissance studies minor
Professor(s):  S. Morrison
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2002
Course Description:  How were 20th century poets influenced by the Anglo-Saxon tradition?  After a brief introduction to the Old English language, this course will introduce students to Old English poetry in translation.
 
HON 3393J, Sex, Drugs, & Cabaret
Substitution(s):  Advanced History Group A or Advanced English Group C
Professor(s):  M. Menninger
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2001, spring 2002, spring 2005, fall 2008, fall 2011
Course Description:  Why does the turn of the 19th century seem an awful lot like the turn of the 20th century?  Why do recurrent themes emerge at the end of centuries?  This writing-intensive seminar considers European life in the years around 1900 with particular emphasis on Vienna and Paris.

HON 3393K, Naturalism, Hume - Present: Science of Matter, Mind, Morals, and God
Substitution(s):  advanced philosophy or religious studies minor or value studies minor
Professor(s):  G. Fulmer
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2001
Course Description:  The thought of David Hume (1711-1776) will be set within the controversy between Continental Rationalists and British Empiricists. Hume's epistemological program of constructing a "Newtonian" science of the mind will be examined.

HON 3393L, History of Ethics: Modern to Contemporary
Substitution(s):  POSI 2320 or advanced political science or HIST 2320
Professor(s):  R. Gorman
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2001, spring 2004, spring 2007
Course Description:  This course traces the historical development of ethics through the study of primary works in literature, history, political thought, ethics, philosophy and law. Students will examine great works in ethical thought and literature from the religious wars of the 17th century and the Enlightenment to modern times. This historical study is a background for a critique of modern understanding of the concept of ethics and its implications for our civic life.

HON 3393M, Gödel, Escher and Bach
Substitution(s):  MATH 4302 or advanced philosophy
Professor(s):  G. Joy
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2001
Course Description:  An interdisciplinary course centering around the issues raised in Douglas Hofstadter's, Godel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid. It will explore the common elements among the works of Kurt Godel, M.C. Escher, and J.S. Bach and relate them to the question of how the human mind manipulates symbols, how it can think about itself, and how the study of the mind opens up the possibility of artificial intelligence. A philosophical as well as mathematical slant will be observed with a special emphasis on the artistic impact of Escher upon the study of geometry. It will explore common elements among their works in art, music and logic.

HON 3393O, Life and Work of the Genius
Substitution(s):  advanced philosophy
Professor(s):  M.S. Kalsi
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2001
Course Description:  The study of the life, times and thought of geniuses. The focus will be on the origin and evolution of the ideas of these great men and women and their influence on later generations, culture and civilization. Their lives will be studied in the context of their families and their country's history, culture and economic situation. Each student will choose a person of genius and during the course of the semester, create a biography of that person.

HON 3393P, Personal Storytelling: Narrative Construction of Meaning
Substitution(s):  advanced psychology, Capstone
Professor(s):  M. Czyzewska
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2002
Course Description:  What stories do we tell ourselves about ourselves? How do these stories affect our views of the world and others? Explore the psychosocial functions of personal narratives. Examine how people communicate the meaning or events by telling stories about them. Learn how personal narratives vary by individual, health and culture. As of Spring 2012, HON 3390V no longer substitutes for PSY 4391.

HON 3393Q, The Epicurean Ideal: Celebrating Life's Simple Pleasures
Substitution(s):  AG 3319 or advanced family and consumer science or advanced psychology, Capstone
Professor(s):  B. Friedman, T. Hulsey
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2002
Course Description:  What does it mean to live "the good life?” What is the right way for humans to live? Examine these topics in an interactive way as we study the Epicurean philosophy of life while concurrently examining the social, moral and political dimensions of human life through good food, informed conversation and rational thinking. As of Spring 2012, HON 3390V no longer substitutes for PSY 4391.

HON 3393R, From Court to Street: 18th Century France
Substitution(s):  Group A History or FR 3301 or FR 3370 or FR 4301 or ENG 2340
Professor(s):  C. Martin
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2002, summer 2007
Course Description:  Why did France move from the gilded age of Louis XIV's Versailles to military dominance of Europe under Napoleon? Examine the cultural revolutions arising in 18th century France by studying the literature, art, architecture and music of the period.

HON 3393S, Entrepreneurship, Leadership and Team Building
Substitutions:  MGT 4350 (previous to fall 2007)
MGT 3360 (Effective fall 2007)
Professor:  J. Bell
Semesters Offered:  spring 2003, fall 2004, spring 2007, spring 2009, fall 2011, fall 2013
Course Description:  This writing-intensive seminar examines the life stories of selected entrepreneurs, identifies leadership qualities that may have contributed to success, and explores research-based principles necessary for groups to become teams and for teams to become high performing. Using selected video tapes of successful entrepreneurs representing the public and private sectors who have spoken at Texas State, this course targets freshman- and sophomore-level students, and is designed to spark genuine interest in creating and identifying opportunities, but especially for turning ideas into substance and tangibles. Seeks to identify characteristics needed to become an entrepreneur or intrapreneur (someone who works within a large enterprise). The course also examines how to build a team and collation and explores leadership principles necessary for team-initiated and directed projects to prosper and succeed.

HON 3393T, The Voices of Eros in Poetry
Substitution(s):  ENG 2330 or ENG 3341
Professor(s):  K. Peirce
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2003, spring 2007, spring 2010, fall 2012
Course Description:  What erotic reality lives in the most private and intense of verbal arts: the poem? What are the concepts of Eros when the other is the opposite? When the other is the same? When the other is divine? How do Neruda, Sappho, Rumi and the Song of Solomon treat these subjects?

HON 3393U, African American Popular Music
Substitution(s):  MU 2313
Professor(s):  N. Schuler
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2003, fall 2005, fall 2011
Course Description:  This course is a reading-, writing-, and listening-intensive interdisciplinary survey of African-American popular music in America and its relationship to American culture, society, politics and the other arts.

HON 3393V, Science and Politics of the Human Diet
Substitution(s):  NUTR 2360 or NUTR 3362
Professor(s):  S. Crixell
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2003, spring 2008, fall 2009
Course Description:  Is the Atkins Diet sound? How does diet affect health, weight and the prospect of successful aging? What is the scientific foundation of human nutrition and how does one evaluate the plethora of diet advice?

HON 3393W, The Rhetoric and Philosophy of Technology
Substitution(s):  ENG 3303 or advanced English or advanced philosophy
Professor(s):  E. Allison, C. Hanks
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2004
Course Description:  How does technological change shape our conception of societies and individuals? How does the language that springs from technology come to permeate our lives and construct reality for us? Team-taught, this course will explore how the rhetoric of technology shapes our understanding of technology, our social and natural worlds, and ourselves.

HON 3393X, Crime Writing: Representations and Memory
Substitution(s):  ENG 2360 or advanced English
Professor(s):  E. Skerpan-Wheeler
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2004
Course Description:  Why is our society so entranced by blood in the news, and why do we enjoy crime drama shows today more than ever before? How are our perspectives shaped by various forms of crime writing? This course uses crime reporting, true-crime writing, literature and film to examine how memory is shaped within a community: how events give rise to competing meanings and how political and social forces combine to favor particular meanings.

HON 3393Y, The Ethics of Care: East and West
Substitution(s):  advanced philosophy or international studies - Asian studies or counts toward women's studies minor
Professor(s):  L. Yuan
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2005, spring 2008, fall 2012
Course Description:  This course compares contemporary Western feminist ethics and ancient Eastern thoughts regarding care. Each stresses personal relations and high moral value placed on care. The course is interdisciplinary and studies gender and multicultural issues through a focus on care-giving.

HON 3393Z, Good Bad and Ugly: Philosophies of Film
Substitution(s):  humanities or Advanced English Group D or advanced philosophy
Professor(s):  R. Bell-Metereau
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2005, fall 2011
Course Description:  This course examines the good and evil as represented in film, posing ethical questions. To what extent does depiction of evil encourage bad behavior? And does the portrayal of a philosophically shallow "good" likewise encourage bad behavior?

HON 3394A, La Onda Latina
Substitution(s):  advanced English
Professor(s):  D. Gilb
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2006
Course Description:  Latinos are becoming the largest "minority" group and this course covers Latino writers of fiction, essays and poetry. The course focuses on the diversity of cultural, historical, political and economic impact on the United States.
Prerequisites: ENG 1310 and ENG 1320

HON 3394B, Consciousness: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Substitution(s):  PSY 3314 or PSY 3341
Professor(s):  G. Lumina
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2006
Course Description:  This course addresses the philosophical, evolutionary, behavioral, neural and cultural nature of consciousness. Students will study the role of consciousness and the relationship to concepts of self, and to psychiatric and neurological medicine.
Prerequisite: PSY 1300, preference for junior / senior psychology majors

HON 3394C, The Japanese Urban Experience
Substitution(s):  ENG 3341, HIST 4344, or International Studies: Asian Studies
Professor(s):  P. Siegenthaler
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2006, spring 2011, spring 2014
Course Description:  Anchored by the world’s largest city, Edo, in the 18th century, Japanese society has long been shaped by a vibrant and distinctive urban culture. Using as primary texts readings in history, anthropology, literature and urban studies, as well as feature films, this course offers a historical look at the notable characteristics of the Japanese city.
 
HON 3394D, The Media, Latinos, and the 2008 Election
Substitution(s):  Advanced Mass Communications, Advanced Political Science or counts toward U.S. Ethnic Studies Minor
Professor(s):  F. Subervi
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2008
Course Description:  What are the relationships between mass media and politics?  How are Latinos affected? What is the role of media, and what are the communications strategies of the DNC and GOP in the 2008 elections?

HON 3394E, The Dark Ages: Evolution of a Historical Construct
Substitution(s):  Group A History or Medieval and Renaissance studies minor
Professor(s):  E. Makowski
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2006, fall 2009
Course Description:  This course examines the durable popular image of the European Middle Ages (approximately 500-1400 C. E.), as the Dark Ages. Students will investigate the concept that originated in the Renaissance and which has manifested itself in subtly restyled versions into the 21st century. Weekly seminar discussions will be based on written student evaluations of primary sources, secondary literature (popular as well as scholarly), art and film. There are no prerequisites for this class.

HON 3394F, Cannibals, Lepers, and Bare-breasted Maidens: Countering Stereotypes of the South Pacific
Substitution(s):  focus course for Asian studies, sophomore literature, advanced English
Professor(s):  N. Wilson
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2006
Course Description:  Study of the history, anthropology, sociology, art, literature and music of the South Pacific will capture an informed image of the region.

HON 3394G, Jazz: Cultural Diversity, Psychological and Political . . .
Substitution(s):  PSY 3334
Professor(s):  H. Ginsburg
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2006
Course Description:  This course is intended to help students appreciate cultural diversity and common unifying experiences leading to jazz, a uniquely American musical form.

HON 3394H, Against Religion: Nietzsche, Marx, Freud
Substitution(s):  advanced philosophy or religious studies minor
Professor(s):  J. Gordon
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2006
Course Description:  In view of the long history of religiously inspired bloodshed, recent revelations of widespread child abuse and an official policy of secrecy and neglect within the Catholic Church, and the clear and present danger posed to civilization by the combination of increased access to nuclear arms and Islamist extremism, many thinkers who had adopted a wholly secular manner of life have been provoked to ask publicly whether the institution of religion and faith have become a leap to death. But the spate of new books calling for "the end of faith," as the title of one of them declaims, are only the latest voices in a chorus first were heard in the Enlightenment and then with increasing intensity in the 19th and 20th centuries. In this course we will examine some of those voices: David Hume, Ludwig Feuerbach, Friedrich Nietzsche, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Ingmar Bergman, and at least two recent (21st century) authors.

HON 3394I, Community Transformation and Tradition: East Asian Tourism
Substitutions(s):  advanced history Group B, international studies: travel and tourism, international business or Asian studies
Professors(s): Siegenthaler
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2008
Course Description:  Tourism in East Asia is growing at a remarkable rate. Looking at both its contemporary conditions and historical development, this course uses several disciplines to introduce students to the dynamics surrounding tourism in East Asia at the opening of the 21st century.

HON 3394J, Disturbing the Peace: Politics of Language and Power in Hip-Hop Culture
Substitution(s):  sophomore literature, advanced English, or counts toward U.S. ethnic studies minor
Professor(s):  Holt, E
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2007
Course Description:  Students will examine/analyze selected raps in terms of the artists' use of African American language practices such as narrativizing, braggadocio, signifying and semantic inversion, a practice hip-hoppers call "flippin' the script." When the script is flipped, bad means good and down means up. The course will also consider other aspects of hip-hop culture such as film, literature, fashion, identity and politics.

HON 3394K, Sonic Visions: Music and Art Intersect
Substitution(s):  ART 2313 or ART 4301
Professor(s):  Housefield, J
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2007
Course Description:  Sonic Visions explores the interaction between the visual arts and music since the late 19th century. Students will see from behind the scenes the process of curating and presenting a major museum exhibition of contemporary art (tentatively scheduled for spring 2008 at the Austin Museum of Art).
 
HON 3394L, Condoms, Veggies & Smoking: Creating Health Campaigns
Substitution(s): Advanced Mass Communication or MC 4382P
Professor(s): D. Laird
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2011
Course Description: Overview of the theory and practice of designing, producing and evaluating health-communication campaigns.
 
HON 3394M, Rendering Nature and Phenomenon in Art
Substitutions: ART 2313, Advanced Art Elective
Professor: E. Chiles
Semesters Offered: fall 2011, spring 2013
Course Description: Course explores, through looking at both historical and contemporary work in drawing, painting, sculpture, video,photography and installation, how nature and phenomena are and have been rendered in art.
  
HON 3394N, Law and the Individual: Intro to Humanities I
Substitution(s):  Sophomore Literature, Advanced English Group C, Advanced Philosophy, or Advanced Political Science
Professor(s):  Morrison, S., Makowski, E.
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2007, fall 2008, fall 2009, fall 2010, fall 2011, fall 2012, fall 2014
Course Description:  This interdisciplinary course examines the dilemmas that arise when individual desires conflict with the needs of society. Students analyze exemplary, original texts from the humanities tradition from the Classical period through the early modern era using the perspectives of literature, political theory, history and philosophy.

HON 3394O, The Meaning of Life in Film
Substitution(s):  advanced philosophy or counts toward media studies interdisciplinary minor
Professor(s):  Gordon, J.
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2007
Course Description:  A close examination of films concerned with challenges to the meaningfulness of human life. An elective in philosophy and media studies, falling under the rubric of the international perspective, this course will introduce students to some of the world’s greatest directors and enable them to investigate in depth the philosophical problems of life and the unique opportunities provided by cinema for its exploration.

HON 3394P, Individuals and Society: Intro to Humanities II
Substitutions(s):  sophomore literature, advanced English, or arranged (varies by semester)
Professors(s): Castillo and Harney, Weimer, Grasso and Martin, Raphael and Martin, Jaffe and DeHart
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2008, spring 2009, spring 2010, spring 2011, spring 2012, spring 2013, spring 2014
Course Description:  This interdisciplinary course examines the dilemmas that arise when individual desires conflict with the needs of society. Students analyze exemplary, original texts from the humanities tradition from the Enlightenment through the present using the perspectives of literature, political theory, history and philosophy.

HON 3394Q, Modern Drama: Theatre of Revolt
Substitutions(s):  advanced theatre or Advanced English Group C
Professors(s): Hood, J.
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2008, fall 2014
Course Description:  This seminar and process-oriented course examines the era of modern drama (late 19th century to 20th century) through text and performance. It provides an in-depth examination of selected playwrights, and provides a historical, literary and production perspective of modern drama.

HON 3394R, Modern Art and Life: A Curatorial Seminar.
Substitutions(s):  ART 2313
Professors(s): Housefield
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2008
Course Description:  This interdisciplinary course examines the intersection of art and life in the careers of artists who contributed to the birth of modern art. Students will learn about modern art’s history and museum operations as they help to curate a major exhibition based on works in a local collection.
 
HON 3394S, Perspectives on the Coming Presidential Election
Substitution(s):  POSI 2320 or Advanced Political Science
Professor(s):  K. Ward
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2008
Course Description:  How do we elect a president in 2008?  What is the perspective of citizens who seek to participate responsibly in the process that selects the next leader of our government?  What is the perspective of people who enjoy election as spectacle, or otherwise seek to define their character through participation/engagement with politics?  Or the media who seek to shape perspectives?  

HON 3394T, Social Class Collision: The Post WWII British Novel of Manners
Substitution(s):  Sophomore Literature or Advanced English Group A
Professor(s):  D. Monroe
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2008
Course Description:  How did evacuations, air raid shelters, the rationing of food, clothes, and gas leveled material prospects and conditions force people who previously had limited interaction into unprecedented contact?  Study six novels that depict both the fluidity and eerie persistence of class distinctions in the post WWII the social landscape.

HON 3394U, Shakespeare in Management
Substitution(s):  Advanced Theatre, Advanced English Group A, Sophomore Literature, or Advanced Management
Professor(s):  J. Hood
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2009
Course Description:  Looking through the perspective of Shakespeare's dramatic works, what were his approaches to leadership?  To management?  Spurred by the 1998 motion picture, Shakespeare in Love, several management-training programs have begun using Shakespeare's works to teach the vulnerabilities to which powerful business leaders are susceptible.  This course uses Shakespeare's plays as case studies; we look at the kings, rulers, and military leaders whose roles require leadership and management skills to gain a perspective on the range of behavioral characteristics--and characters--who manage our economies and our lives.
 
HON 3394V, Universal Human Rights: A Global Perspective
Substitutions: International Studies, SoWk 3339 or SoWk 4360
Professor: Hawkins, C.
Semesters Offered: fall 2009, fall 2010, spring 2013
Course Description: What are the significant social, political, philosophical, historical, legal, economic, geographic, and cultural factors that impact universal human rights? What are the challenges involved in implementing universal human rights; what efforts effectively redress inequity and what are the opposing viewpoints? Students will engage in critical intellectual inquiry and personal self-reflection in order to facilitate the development of a global perspective for the 21st century.
 
HON 3394W, "Lived Reality" and the Role of International Development in Southeast Asia
Substitution(s): International Studies Elective, or counts towards Women's Studies Minor
Professor(s): A. Brooks
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2011
Course Description: Seminar examines the ways in which international development is implemented in Southeast Asia.
 
HON 3394X, Magic Realism in the Works of Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Substitutions:  SPAN 4350, 4330, or 3371, ENG 2340, 3341, or 3316, or HIST 3325H, Advanced English Group C
Professor: Ugalde, S              
Semesters Offered: spring 2010, spring 2013
A study of selected works of Nobel Prize author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, focusing on literature, history, politics, and popular culture of Latin America.
 
HON 3394Y, The Quest for the Sacred in a Secular Age: Late-Modern Novels
Substitution(s): Advanced elective for the Religious Studies minor, Sophomore Literature, or Advanced Political Science
Professor(s): Monroe, D             
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2010
Course description: The Protestant Reformation weakened the notion of a homogenous, central religion, as did the theories of Charles Darwin and Sigmund Freud.  Yet the sense that God was no longer a collective concept, but a private belief did not seem mainstream until the twentieth century.  We will study five novels that explore this shift.
 
HON 3394Z, The Black Image in Postwar America
Substitution(s): Art 2313 or Upper Division Art History
Professor(s): Duganne, E
Semster(s) Offered: fall 2010, fall 2011
This course focuses on images of blackness in the postwar period in the United States. It explores the complex ways in which blackness has been figured and represented in postwar America. Students will gain a historical sense of the variegated ways that artists have represented blackness in their works through conceptual art and performance.
 
HON 3395A, Seeds of Change: Plants and Society
Substitution(s):  advanced biology or counts towards the Natural Science Core Component
Professor(s):  Williams/Flores
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2007, spring 2008, spring 2009
Course Description:  Plants and Society focuses on the uses of plants and the roles plants have played in shaping the history of the world. The course stresses interdisciplinarity, diversity and multiculturalism and is designed to provide an in-depth integrated overview of the biology, chemistry and culture of plants placed in historical perspective.
 
HON 3395B, Integral Ecology
Substitutions:  Advanced Biology or Advanced Philosophy
Professor:  V. Lopes
Semesters Offered:  fall 2008, fall 2009, fall 2010, fall 2011, fall 2013, fall 2014
Course Description:  What is the future of humanity on earth?  How do the intuitive awareness of the oneness of life, the interdependence of its multiple manifestations, and its cycles of change affect that future?  How does science affect our attitude toward the natural world?

HON 3395C, Fibers to Fabrics: the Interlacing of History, Science and Technology
Substitution(s):  Advanced Fashion Merchandising or Family & Consumer Science Elective
Professor(s):  G. Hustvedt
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2009, spring 2011
Course Description:  Fibers to Fabric focuses on the role of fiber products in the development of a sustainable future.   Through interdisciplinary investigations, the course seeks to provide an in-depth understanding of fiber science and examine various environmental, historic, economic, and social issues in order to evaluate current and emerging approaches to sustainability.
 
HON 3395D, Sustainable Urbanism: Reinventing Our Communities
Substitutions:  Geography required elective for the following Geography Majors: Resources and Enviornmental Studies, Urban and Regional Planning, or the general Geography major.
Professor:  J. Vaughan
Semesters Offered:  spring 2012, spring 2013
Course Description:  Examines the human and environmental impacts of urbanization and critically assesses applied techniques that are being made, or proposed, to develop cities in truly sustainable ways. Students will investigate the origins and concepts of sustainable development, as well as the application of sustainable solutions to today's urban problems.

HON 3395E, Families and the Workplace
Substitution(s):  FCS 4347, SOCI 3337, SOCI 3338, or counts toward Social Gerontology Minor
Professor(s):  M. Canabal
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2008, fall 2009
Course Description:  How do the demands of family and work challenge families and individuals in contemporary society?  What is the interaction of work, family, gender, race/ethnicity, and class?  Students will apply their area of interest to the study of the family-work interaction.

HON 3395F, Museum Representations
Substitution(s):  Social & Behavioral Sciences Component or Advanced Anthropology
Professor(s):  N. Hadder
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2008
Course Description:  How are cultural and aesthetic values, identity, difference, history, progress, and the scientific record constructed in a museum exhibit?  Using art criticism and interpretation, students will construct a class exhibition project.
 
HON 3395G, 19th Century German Lieder
Substitution(s):  MU 2313 or Advanced Music
Professor(s):  C. Gonzales
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2009, spring 2014
Course Description:  19th-century German songs engage musical structures to represent literary ideas of poetry.  What are the text-music relationships of the poetry and the music of Lieder?  What makes up the history, primary composers, most important repertoire, and continuing tradition into the 20th century of the German Lieder?  Students will analyze songs for the meaning and structure of lyrics, the musical structure, and propose correspondences between the poem and the music.  Students will compose a song in the style of a 19th-century German Lied.
 
HON 3395H, Teaching Math to Children
Substitution(s):  MATH 1315 or MATH 4302
Professor(s):  Sorto and McCabe
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2009
Course Description:  Students will create and teach mathematical lessons for elementary school aged children that integrate algebra and geometry.  Students will design and teach lessons that engage young children in building their own mathematical understanding using inquiry-based methods.  Children will be exposed to inductive and deductive reasoning processes.  Honors students will experience the power of creating a sequence of engaging activities, learn the patience to let students struggle with the mathematical ideas, and then through observation and reflection, allow the children to claim their own understanding.
 
HON 3395I, Ever Since Darwin
Substitution(s):  PSY 3323 or PSY 4391*
Professor(s):  H. Ginsburg
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2009, fall 2010, spring 2012, spring 2014
Course Description:  Examine Charles Darwin's all-encompassing natural selection theory.  How did the theory change western civilization?  How did the theory explain the emergence of every species' characteristics, including the human body and the human mind?  What reasoning and evidence did Darwin use and what were the flaws and fallout?  The course celebrates the observance of Darwin's 200th birthday and the 150th anniversary of Darwin's Origins of Species. *As of Spring 2012, HON 3395I no longer substitutes for PSY 4391.
 
HON 3395J, The Meaning of Death
Substitution(s):  PHIL 1320 or Advanced Philosophy
Professor(s):  J. Gordon, R. W. Fischer
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2008, fall 2012
Course Description:  How does the fact that we will die affect the possibility of our living a meaningful life?  In this course we will examine answers to this question provided by philosophers, psychologists, literary writers, and filmmakers.
 
HON 3395K, The World’s a Stage: Dramatic Glimpses of the Human Condition and Contemporary Issues
Substitution(s):  Advanced Theatre, Sophomore Literature or Advanced English Group C
Professor(s):  J. Hood
Semester(s) Offered:  fall 2008, fall 2009, fall 2014
Course Description:  This course examines the human condition through dramatic literature from the classical era through the present day.  An understanding of the individual human being in the modern/contemporary eras—when science, wars, the arts, religion, education, and philosophy increasingly impact and change the human condition—enhances our understanding of the human experience and helps us define the range of needs, goals, and behaviors in today’s world.
 
HON 3395L, Summer Study in France
Substitutions: French 2310, 2320 or advanced French
Professor: C. Martin, Modern Languages.  Course location is in Rennes, France with optional week in Paris
Semesters offered: summer 2009, 2010, 2014
This total immersion program in French language and culture will provide students with a comprehensive approach and authentic language environment to continue the development of proficiency in French. Students will also achieve greater cultural understanding by becoming immediately and personally involved with different values inherent in a foreign culture. 
 
HON 3395M, Humanity & the Natural Enviroment: A Study of Interrelationships
Substitution:  Advanced Biology 
Professor: W. Rast
Semesters Offered:  spring 2010, spring 2011, spring 2012, spring 2013
An interdisciplinary introduction to the interdependence between humans and their natural environment, emphasizing linkages between human activities and their impacts on environmental resources and sustainability, including the ecosystem goods and services provided by a healthy environment.
 
HON 3395N, Media Literacy: Frameworks for Critical Thinking, Analyses and Teaching about the Media
Substitution(s): Mass Comm 3355
Professor(s): Subervi, F
Semester Offered: fall 2010
Course Description: The mass media - and ever more so Internet sites are the most important source for obtaining news, information and entertainment for youth and society at large. How does one critically assess the media institutions, their messages and potential effects? What is the influence of media on various social classes and racial/ethnic groups? Students will explore the increasingly large and diverse media and news literacy organizations and resources that have been developed over the last two decades. Creative, hands-on-production projects will also be options.
 
HON 3395O, Social and Political Humor through the Art of Improvisation
Substitution(s): TH 4330C
Professor(s): P. Bishop
Semester(s) Offered: spring 2011, fall 2012
Course Description: This course will combine the development of improvisational skills with the cultivation of a satirical view of the human situation. Working in smaller groups to sharpen their own wit and humor, students will present prepared sardonic scenes of contemporary social and political folly. Students will develop skills in improvisation through mixing critical attitudes toward news events with wit and humor, utilizing irony, exaggeration and characterization, students will develop their skills in improvisation.
 
HON 3395P, Preserving Humanity in the Face of Conflict
Substitutions: ENG 1310, 1320, Sophomore Literature, or Advanced English Group C
Professor: S. Noll
Semesters Offered: spring 2012, fall 2013, fall 2014
Course Description: Examines the human impact of several global conflicts that have occured over the past forty years. Students will explore interdisciplinary knowledge of various aspects of the human experience in times of conflict.
 
HON 3395Q, Vishnu, Bollywood & Masala: South Asian Literature in Context
Substitution(s): Sophomore literature, Advanced English Group C or International Studies elective
Professor(s): N. Wilson
Semester(s) Offered: spring 2011
Course Description: How do religious texts such as The Bhagavad Gita as well as contemporary texts by writers such as Salman Rushdie reveal the culture, history and religion of South Asia? Students will be immersed in South Asian culture through Bollywood movies, field trips to temples and art museums, learning meditaion, preparing and enjoying Indian food, and interviewing individuals from the region.
 
HON 3395R, Hip-Hop Culture and Youth Development
Substitution(s): SOWK 3339 or counts toward the Diversity Studies Minor
Professor(s): R. Travis
Semester(s) Offered: spring 2012
Course Description: Hip-Hop Culture is examined within the context of human development over the life course. Cultural dynamics are viewed alongside the social and political history of the United States. Through the lens of Hip-Hop, students will use skills in reflection, discussion, and creative expression to develop strategies for personal growth and development.
 
HON 3395T, Fast Reading for Fun: The Birth of Mass Media in Victorian England
Substitution(s): Advanced English Group A
Professor(s): K. Ledbetter
Semester(s) Offered: spring 2012
Course Description:  Explores literature published during the English Victorian period (1837-1901) in tandem with articles, literature, illustrations, advertising, and news items published in popular Victorian periodicals. Students will be able to examine a cross-section of Victorian culture, get a more intimate understanding of this important moment in the development of communication and mass media in Western civilization, and learn the relevance of the Victorian period to our own media moment.
 
HON 3395U, Travel Journalism
Substitution(s): MC 4382O
Professor(s): S. Rao
Semester(s) Offered: spring 2012
Course Description:  This seminar/lab course explores techniques of writing journalistic travel narratives for the media including (online and traditional) newspapers and blogs. Students will develop and write travel stories using diverse, interdisciplinary approaches. Students will learn information-gathering and interviewing skills, and narratives techniques pertinent to travel writing.
 
HON 3395V, Introduction to LGBT Studies: An Interdisciplanary Approach
Substitution(s): SOWK 3339 or counts toward the Diversity Studies Minor
Professor(s): Hawkins, Catherine
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2012
Course Description: This course is an introduction to LGBT Studies, combining three academic disciplines: social, political, and historical; drama and fine arts; and English and queer theory. These disciplines will be integrated throughout the semester to assist students in developing a perspective of local, national, and global LGBT themes and issues. In this course, students will analyze the contributions and marginalization of LGBT people and their straight allies throughout history, particularly in the more recent sexual and gender rights movement. Students will also conduct and present scholarly research of a topic of their interest within LGBT Studies to gain a deeper understanding of the subject.
 
HON 3395W, The Writer in the Factory: Screenwriting History and Theory
Substitution(s): Advanced Art History, Advanced Theatre, Advanced English Group D, or counts toward the Minor in Media Studies
Professor(s): Macor, A
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2012
Course Description: This course will shed light on the much-neglected role of the screenwriter in filmmaking and illuminate how the “writing” of a film is a complex process that results in much more than just a screenplay. This course seeks to investigate how the notion of writing for the screen has developed throughout film history. This course is not a class that teaches screenwriting technique. Rather, this course examines how the script has been regarded within the film industry over time, taking a historical perspective on screenwriting and the role of the screenwriter as each has developed throughout film history.
 
HON 3395X, Portraiture: Writing Yourself into Academia
Substitutions: ENG 1320 or ENG 3311
Professor: Ellis-Lai, Laura
Semesters Offered: fall 2012, fall 2013, fall 2014
Course Description: Portraiture is a cross-genre research methodology in which writers study a person, a group of people, an institution, or a concept. Students will create carefully researched portraits that integrate personal narrative, interviews, and academic research. Portraiture values students’ lived experiences and has roots in anthropology, sociology, journalism, and creative nonfiction. The course provides an opportunity for students to learn how to integrate their lived experiences and personal perspectives with the published work of advanced scholars in various disciplines. Students will reflect on the nature of knowledge as it exists both within and outside of academia.
 
HON 3395Y, Juke Twang and Shout: Popular Music and Race in the U.S. South
Substitution(s): HIST 1320 or counts for HIST upper division course C
Professor(s):Mellard, Jason
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2012
Course Description: Amongst the genres of American popular music, styles heavily associated with the U. S. South tend to predominate, and the history of each seems to be entangled with that region’s contentious racial history. This course will engage the history of musical production and performance in the South while also examining the hagiography of the South, its music, and its people.
 
HON 3395Z, Media, Ethnic Minorities, & Politics
Substitution(s): MC 3355 or upper-division POSI Group II
Professor(s): Subervi, Federico
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2012
Course Description: During the final stretch of the ongoing presidential campaign, the Democratic Party and the Republican Party will be in the midst of not only the general communication and propaganda efforts to win the election, but will also be making the most concerted efforts to woo and win Latino and other ethnic minority votes. Just how that will play in general market and ethnic minority oriented media, and with what outcomes, will be a central part of the discussions and learning of this course.
 
HON 3396A, Rubbish, Waste, and Litter: Cultural Refuse/als
Substitution(s): Advanced English Group C
Professor(s): S. Morrison
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2009
Course Description: Take part in a conversation focused on filth, rubbish, garbage, and litter from the field of waste studies. This interdisciplinary course integrates the material reality of and historical practices regarding excrement with rhetorical, figurative, and symbolic representation of the excremental in written and figurative texts. Students will explore waste studies in literature, media, history, anthropology, religion, philosophy and ecocriticism.
 
HON 3396B, Playwriting: A Structure Approach to Writing for the Stage
Substitutions:  Advanced English Group D or Advanced Theatre
Professor: Hood, J.
Semesters Offered:  spring 2010, spring 2011, spring 2012, spring 2013, spring 2014
Course Description: This course develops the basic professional techniques and skills used in writing for the writing and theatrical stage.  Students analyze scripts and perform practical exercises in story and character development, study dramatic play and structure, and develop a full-length dramatic play.  Weekly readings and critiques assist writers in refining their scripts.
 
HON 3396C, Screenwriting: A Structured Approach to Writing for the Screen
Substitutions: Adv Theatre, Adv. English Group D, or counts toward the Minor in Media Studies
Professor: J. Hood
Semesters Offered: fall 2009, fall 2010, fall 2011, fall 2012, fall 2013, fall 2014
Course Description: Develop basic professional techniques and skills used in writing for the screen. Analyze contemporary scripts, perform practical exercises in story and character development, study screenplay structure and format, and develop a full-length screenplay. The seminar and workshop format provide opportunities for weekly readings and critiques to assist writers in refining their scripts.
 
HON 3396D, Mythology, Science & Creation
Substitution(s): Adv Philosophy or Adv English Group C or counts toward the Religious Studies Minor
Professor(s): R. Raphael
Semester(s) Offered:  spring 2010
Using religious studies scholarship on myth, the course surveys creation mythologies from around the world. Native American, African, Near Eastern (including Biblical), Greco-Roman, Old European, and Asian myths will be included. Cosmological myths will then be compared to scientific cosmology and the current model(s) of the Universe’s origin. 
 
HON 3396E, Free Speech, Free Press & the Supreme Court of the U.S.
Substitutions: MC 4301 or advanced Political Science
Professor: G. Martinez
Semesters Offered:  spring 2010, spring 2011, spring 2012, spring 2013, spring 2014
This course focuses on U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to the First Amendment and the five rights of religion, speech, press assembly, and petition.  By examining how the high court has interpreted the First Amendment, students will learn about the government’s sometimes wavering commitment to our nation’s most cherished rights.
 
HON 3396F, The Art of Storytelling: From Origins to Improv
Substitutions: Sophomore Literature, advanced Theatre, or advanced English Group D
Professor: J. Hood
Semesters Offered: spring 2010, fall 2010, spring 2011, spring 2012, spring 2013, spring 2014, summer 2014
This course examines the art and culture of storytelling from ancient to contemporary times.  Students read and analyze stories from oral and written traditions and develop skills in creating and applying storytelling in social, business, political, and entertainment environments.
 
HON 3396G, Graphic Novel: Form and Practice
Substitution(s): Advanced English Group D and Advanced Art
Professor(s): A. Campbell
Semester(s) offered: spring 2010, spring 2011
This course addresses the popular form of the cultural boundaries among gender, sexuality, race, nationality, and citizenship.  Students will analyze graphic novels and create their own, becoming familiar with the form/media of the graphic novel in dialogue with other forms/media.
 
HON 3396H, Depictions of Sexuality in Children's & Adolescent Literature & Culture
Substitutions: Sophomore Literature or Advanced English
Professor: C. Jones
Semesters Offered: fall 2010, fall 2013
Course Description: This course will explore contemporary issues of childhood and teen human sexuality, including depictions of gender and orientation, in fiction and nonfiction for children and adolescents. We will additionally explore pedagogical, social, and political issues arising from and informing societal perceptions and enactments of sexuality.
 
HON 3396I,  Service Learning & the Second Language Acquisition Learner
Substitution(s): French 4390, Linguistics 4390, Spanish 4312 or 4390
Professor(s): Y. Beale-Rivaya
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2010
Course Description:  This course deals with aspects of learning second language acquisition methodologies, structures, or with pedagogical issues related to teaching a second language.
 
Honors 3396J, Literature in Performance: Presenting Earlier Shakespeare
Substitutions: Advanced Theatre or English 3354
Professor:  J. Hood
Semesters offered: summer 2010
This new collaborative course melds the study of dramatic literature with the practicalities of presenting Shakespeare's earlier plays (1590 – 1600). Professor John Hood focuses on presentation, performance, and production; in the parallel English 3354 Earlier Shakespeare course, Professor Dan Lochman focuses on literary and critical values.

Students in both courses will attend the same lecture sessions and study the same resources, and will form collaborative teams to adapt and stage presentations of three early plays by Shakespeare: The Taming of the Shrew, Richard III, and The Merchant of Venice. Students in this Honors course will concentrate on adaptation, direction, staging, and production using an ensemble of performers from both courses.
 
HON 3396L, Early American History through Biography
Substitutions: HIST 1310 or HIST 3342
Professor:  A. Murphy
Semesters offered: spring 2011, spring 2012, spring 2013
What is the individual and human element in the study of history? How have individuals both affected and been affected by larger historical events and trends like the American Revolution, the expansion of white democracy, western expansion, the market revolution, the slave labor system, the sectional crisis, and the Civil War? Students will assess the ways in which biography as a genre can serve as a vital form of history.
 
HON 3396M, Transforming Creative Art: Literature in Performance, Presenting Later Shakespeare
Substitutions: Advanced Theatre or ENG 4355
Professor: J. Hood
Semester Offered: summer II 2011; summer I 2012
Course Description: This seminar/workshop series examines the transformation of literature into performance using three examples from Shakespeare's later plays.  Through close reading and analysis, students develop a critical understanding of literary, sociological, and cultural attributes of written works, and then develop approaches to transforming and presenting the works into dramatic performances.
 
HON 3396N, American History Through Memoir: From the End of Reconstruction to the Present Day
Substitution(s): HIST 1320
Professor(s): P. Seigenthaler
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2011, fall 2012
Course Description: This course presents American history since the late 19th century in a way that differs from the standard survey format. The memoir-centered approach will provide students with an opportunity to build their own understanding of historical events by seeing them first hand through the eyes of the thoughtful observers of the times and then in the contet of broader secondary literature. Featured memoirs will relate American history "from the margins," including vioices of Native peoples, African-Americans, political and cultural dissidents, and recent immigrants.
 
HON 3396O, The Extraordinary in the Everyday
Substitutions: Art 2313 or Advanced Art & Design
Professor: E. Chiles
Semesters Offered: spring 2012, fall 2012, spring 2013
Course Description:  Examines how artists from Hemingway, to the French Situationists, to contemporary artists all over the world have approached finding or being present in the everyday. Field assignments to ordinary sites will engage students critically in the environment. We will discuss the political and social ramifications of involvement in the everyday environment in order to reconfigure a prescribed space.
 
HON 3396P, Bad Taste
Substitution: Art 2313
Professor: A. Campbell
Semesters Offered: spring 2012, fall 2013
Course Description:  What does it mean to have bad taste? While investigating this question, students will gain an understanding of how discussions of taste are linked to the innumerable ways in which people, through their behavior or choice of aesthetic objects, place themselves, or are placed, into hierarchies of knowledge and power.
 
HON 3396Q, Public Policy for Energy, the Environment, and Global Sustainability
Substitutions: International Studies Elective or POSI 4322
Professors: Rahm, Dianne
Semesters Offered: fall 2012, fall 2013
Course Description: How do we find ways for the world's growing population to live sustainably? This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to U.S. policy for energy, the environment, and sustainability. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the laws, regulations, and treaties that oversee air and water pollution, solid waste, hazardous waste, energy use, natural resources, climate change, and global governance for energy, environment, and sustainability.
 
HON 3396S, The American Song: Opression, Protest, and Praise
Substitution(s): MU 2313,  Advanced Sociology Elective or counts toward the Popular Culture Minor
Professor(s): Hood, John
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2012
Course Description:  This workshop course engages students in the cultural history and sociology of the United States from the perspective of songs, which are studied as persuasive exemplars that subtly shape public opinion and boldly inspire public action. Students integrate their study and interests by creating effective songs and lyrics.
 

HON 3396T, How We Decide: Making Decisions from the Inside Out
Substitutions: Advanced Business Elective or counts toward the Leadership Studies
Minor Professor: Dickinson, M.
Semesters Offered: spring 2013, fall 2013, spring 2014
Course Description: This interdisciplinary seminar enlightens students on the decision-making process using contemporary research from neuroscience, psychology, management, healthcare, etc. From this foundation students will examine case studies at the individual, group, and societal levels, and they will evaluate a cross section of decision aids such as heuristics, ethics, and computers.

HON 3396U, From White Slavery to Sex Trafficking
Substitutions: Advanced HIST elective, Advanced Criminal Justice elective, POSI 3395, POSI 4330-Group II, POSI 4304-Group III, POSI 4326-Group V, International Studies elective
Professor: Pliley, J.
Semester Offered: fall 2013
Course Description: What is the history of the anti-white slavery movement of the late nineteenth century and how has that history affected the migration of sex workers across the globe? How has that history affected the modern day anti-sex trafficking movement?  What are the debates about sex work and sex trafficking of the twenty-first century?

HON 3396V, Witches, Whores, Murderers, and Theives: Capital Crime in Early America
Substitutions: HIST 1310 or 3368B
Professor: Duffy, S.
Semester Offered: spring 2014
Course Description: This course is an in-depth investigation intot the social and legal culture of Early America through the study of microhistories. This course concentrates on a series of capital crimes, ranging from murder to witchcraft. The time period from the 17th century through the Age of Jackson. Microhistories, a relatively new form of history, use the legal records surrounding a single court case, in combination with other primary records such as probates, wills, execution sermons and newspaper accounts, to open a window into the lives of a community at that particular time and place.

HON 3396W, The Dragon and Spaceship: Fantasy, Utopia, and the Fiction of Estrangement
Substitutions: ENG 2330, 2340, or 3341
Professor: Tally, R.
Semester Offered: fall 2013
Course Description: This is a course on world literature that looks specifically at otherworldly literature, or what China Miéville has recently referred to as the fiction of estrangement, including works frequently categorized as utopia or dystopia, fantasy, and science fiction. Prerequisites: First-year writing (English 1310, 1320) or the equivalent. Texts include: Jameson, Archaeologies of the Future; Bellamy, Looking Backward, 2000–1887 ; Zamyatin, We; Orwell, Animal Farm; Tolkien, The Hobbit; Vonnegut, Cat’s Cradle; Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy; and Collins, The Hunger Games. 

HON 3396X, Storytelling in Video Games
Substitutions: ANTH 3309 or ENG 3307, 3327, 3328, 3329, or 3340
Professor: Winchell, A.
Semester Offered: spring 2014
Course Description: "Anyone who tries to make a distinction between education and entertainment doesn't know the first thing about either." - Marshal McLuhan
This course will examine how stories are crafted to fit new interactive media, how these new stories resemble traditional stories from the literary canon, and what these unorthodox plots, characters, and games reveal about the players and video game writers.

HON 3396Y, Urban Horticulture
Substitution: Advanced Horticulture elective
Professor: LeDuc, A.
Semester Offered: fall 2013, fall 2014
Course Description: This course introduces students to urban landscape and the regional environment and the role the two play in the quality of life. Students will look at people-plant interactions as they relate to art, science, practice, and commercial products and services of Horticulture, and the impact that land use decisions have on the sustainability of the environment.

HON 3396Z, Eating Animals in America: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives
Substitutions: PHIL 1320 or Advanced HIST elective
Professors: Fischer, R. and McWilliams, J.
Semester Offered: fall 2013, fall 2014
Course Description: This course has two aims: first, to introduce students to the changing nature of, and views about, the production and consumption of animals in America from the 18th century to the present; second, to introduce students to the philosophical issues raised by the practice of eating animals.

HON 3397A, Revolution, Malaise, Reaction, and Sleaze: America in the 1970's
Substitutions: HIST 1320 or advanced History elective
Professor: Mellard. J.
Semester(s) Offered: spring 2014
Course Description: This course revisits the reputation of a decade in which it seemed like nothing happened. To the contrary, many recent commentators have claimed the Seventies as a pivotal historical moment. We will engage questions regarding why this is so, and how an understanding of the 1970's helps us to orient ourselves in the contemporary political, economic, and cultural milieu.

HON 3397B, Plotting the American Experience
Substitutions: ENG 2360, 3336, or 3340
Professor: Marquiss, C.
Semester(s) Offered: spring 2014
Course Description: This course examines plot in major contemporary American novels and stories (1985-present), both as a driving force in the work(s) and as a reflection of recent American history. Students will have an opportunity to explore living writers and an unfolding literary landscape in terms of plot, conventions, and source material -- an interdisciplinary study of the real and imagined events that shape who we are in this place and time.

HON 3397C, Geography in Africa
Substitutions: Advanced Geography elective
Professor: Hammon, L.
Semester(s) Offered: spring 2014
Course Descrition: This course is a systematic approach to the multifaceted aspects of the physical and human geography of the African continent.  It will include an examination of the effects of globalization on changing environmental, cultural, economic, urban, and political landscapes exposing the student to a variety of contemporary ideas, theories, and concepts in African geography, and their applicability to “real world” situations.

HON 3397D, Urban Immersion: Seeing Cities through Cinema
Substitutions: Advanced Geography elective
Professor: Vaughan, J.
Semester(s) Offered: spring 2014
Course Description: This course explores themes in urban studies using full-length films and selected readings.  Students will study the geo-political, economic, and socio-cultural dimensions of cities and urban society.  Using cinema as a pedagogical tool immerses students in the urban experience more than traditional instructional methods, resulting in a richer and more impactful understanding of the subject.  

HON 3397E, Literary Barcelona
Substitutions: ENG 3322, 3323, 3340, 3341, or International Studies Elective
Professor: Cassells, C.
Semester(s) Offered: spring 2014
Course Description: Students will gain a vibrant glimpse into memoir, novels, poetry, plays, and short stories enhanced with photography, film, and music, that affirm Barcelona as a place of literary imagination and vitality.

HON 3397F, America vs. the World: The History of a Love-Hate Relationship
Substitutions: HIST 2320, 3342, 3343, or International Studies Elective
Professor: Haas, R.
Semester(s) Offered: spring 2014
Course Descrition: Is America an "exceptional" country? Does it have a special role to play in world affairs? The hotly debated theory of "American exceptionalism" holds that the American people and the American polity are fundamentaly "different," and that this distinctiveness, furthermore, is related to America's unique status as a "city upon a hill." Proponents of American exceptionalism maintain that its vision and ideals continue to inspire the best in our national traditions. To most of the rest of the world, however, the theory of “American exceptionalism” is not only egocentric and self-serving, but downright dangerous.  Since 9/11 and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, there seems to be a steady rise in European and global anti-Americanism, both in its most virulent form—terrorism—and in its more common and widespread expressions.  In this interdisciplinary course in the history of ideas, we will investigate the history of both “American Exceptionalism” and “Anti-Americanism” from the European colonization of the New World up to the present in order to gain a deeper understanding of America’s position in the world and the love-hate relationship between America and the rest.

HON 3397G, Memoirs from Lives off the Neurotypical Map
Substitutions: ENG 2360 (Group-B American), or ENG 3340
Professor: LeBlanc, R.
Semester(s): spring 2014
Course Description: Whether due to improved diagnostic testing, the effects of an increasingly toxic environment, heritability, or a combination of these, the population with disabilities, disorders, and mental diseases is expanding. To understand the growing neurologically disabled, disordered, and mentally ill population and our perceptions of them and ourselves, we will analyze memoirs and aesthetic works by this true fringe group. We will also consider what being fundamentally different means, and how labels affect people in and out of the neurotypical majority.

HON 3397H, International Culture Course

Substitutions: Honors

Professor: DiMauro-Jackson, M.

Semester: Projected Summer 2015

Course Description: This study abroad course will cultivate student knowledge of the similarities and differences among international cultures, values, traditions, beliefs, and customs. Discussions and written assignments will provide opportunities to understand the cultural achievements and human conditions of the specific target country. Field trips will provide cultural components to add to the discussion and written assignments.

HON 3480B, Building a Greener Future: One House at a Time
Substitution(s): Honors
Professor(s): Galloway, H
Semester(s) Offered: fall 2010
Course Description: This course addresses current issues in the natural sciences, particularly those that have significance for today. This course includes a laboratory or fieldwork component.

HON 3480C, Teaching Physical Science to Children
Substitutions: PHYS 1310 and 1110
Professor: Close, E.; Galloway, H.
Semesters Offered: spring 2013, summer 2014, fall 2014
Course Description: This course will focus on developing a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in physical science and how these concepts relate to making sense of our everyday experience. This studio-style course includes both physics concepts and research findings on physics teaching and learning. This course will be fulfilling for all but is especially ideal for those interested in teaching K-8.
 
HON 4390A, Senior Seminar / Honors Thesis Research Methods
Substitution:  Advanced elective
Professor:  J. Hood, D. McCabe
Semesters Offered:  Every fall and spring
Course Description:  This course provides the opportunity to focus on research and learn research techniques appropriate for an honors thesis. This course provides the foundation to develop a realistic project, find a supportive thesis supervisor, build a bibliography and outline, and complete the review of literature. Most students who take HON 4390A do so prior to taking HON 4390B during their junior or senior year.

HON 4390B, Honors Thesis
Substitution:  Advanced elective
Professor:  H. Galloway
Semesters Offered:  Every fall, spring, and summer
Course Description:  Students enrolled in HON 4390B work with the guidance of their supervising professor to complete their honors thesis. In addition, thesis students present their thesis project at the Honors thesis forum or undergraduate research conference.
 
HON 4391, Honors Independent Study
Substitutions:  Arranged
Professors:  Arranged
Semesters Offered:  Every semester
Course Description:  Individual study under direct supervision of a professor for Honors credit.