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Anadelia Romo


Dr. RomoOffice: TMH-210
Email: ar23@txstate.edu
Phone: 512.245.2123


Curriculum Vitae

Anadelia Romo received her B.A. in History from Princeton University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in History at Harvard University. Her area of specialty is Latin America and her research has focused on gender in early 20th century Chile and race relations in modern Brazil. Her dissertation examined race and primary education in post-abolition Bahia, Brazil, and traced how regional identities and transatlantic intellectual connections shaped the impact of racial thought. Her first book, Brazil’s Living Museum, examines ideas of race in Bahia across the twentieth century. She is particularly interested in the social and intellectual history of Latin America.

Educational Background :
Ph.D. - Harvard University, 2004
M.A. - Harvard University, 1999
B.A. - Princeton University, 1996

Areas of Interest:
Latin American history; race and gender; and the history of anthropology

Recent Research Topics :
Racial ideas in post-abolition Bahia, Brazil

Previous Publications :
Brazil's Living Museum: Race, Reform and Tradition in Bahia. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 2010.

"O que é que a Bahia representa? O Museu do Estado da Bahia e as disputas em torno da definição da cultura baiana (O que é que a Bahia representa? Bahia's State Museum and the Struggles to Define Bahian Culture)." Afro-Ásia 39 (2009): 115-152.

"Rethinking Race and Culture in Brazil’s First Afro-Brazilian Congress of 1934." Journal of Latin American Studies 39, no. 1 (2007): 31-54.

Awards and Accomplishments :
Texas State University Presidential Excellence Award in Teaching, Assistant Professor Level, 2006-2007
Texas State University Dean's Golden Apple Award in Teaching, Assistant Professor Level, 2006-2007
Departmental nominee for Texas State University Teaching Award 2005-2006
Texas State University Research Enhancement Grant 2005
Texas State University Department Travel and Research Grant 2004, 2005
Spencer Foundation Fellowship 2003-2004
Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship (declined) 2003-2004
Harvard Mellon Fellowship 2002-2003, 2001-2002, 1999-2000
Fulbright Fellowship recipient (declined) 2001
Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship 2000-2001

Professional Memberships :
AHA, American History Association
BRASA, Brazilian Studies Association
LASA, Latin American Studies Association


Courses Taught

HIST 2311 WORLD CIVILIZATION TO 1700
This course provides an overview of world cultures until the early 17th century. Students will gain a greater familiarity with cultures beyond their own and a broad, historically-informed international perspective. Student will be expected to think historically about the course material and engage in critical interpretations of primary and secondary sources. The course requires extensive analysis of primary sources, enabling students to participate in and reflect upon the practice of history.

HIST 2312 WORLD CIVILIZATION SINCE 1700
This course provides an overview of world cultures from the 14th century to the present. Students will gain a greater familiarity with cultures beyond their own and a broad, historically-informed international perspective. Student will be expected to think historically about the course material and engage in critical interpretations of primary and secondary sources. The course requires extensive analysis of primary sources, enabling students to participate in and reflect upon the practice of history.

HIST 4350A SLAVERY AND EMANCIPATION IN THE AMERICAS
This course examines Atlantic slavery and the societies that it shaped in the Americas. By focusing on the cases of Cuba, Brazil, and the United States it provides a broad and comparative context on the nature of slavery in the New World and analyzes the ways in which different structures of labor create different societies. The course also pays particular attention to the new culture in the Americas that arose from the forced migration of Africans. Discussion of primary and secondary texts, as well as critical writing, form a major component of this course.

HIST 4350E GENDER IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
This course surveys the role of gender in Latin American history, from pre-conquest to the present. It analyzes Latin American politics, culture, and economics, and gives particular attention to the creation and resistance of social norms. The objectives of this course are to emphasize the importance of gender in understanding the culture, economics, and politics of different societies at different historical moments and to expose students to a variety of historical approaches to gender in Latin America. The course strengthens analytical skills through extensive discussion and writing.

HIST 5324C SLAVERY AND EMANCIPATION IN THE AMERICAS
This graduate seminar examines slavery in the Americas in its full social, political, and economic context. Students will enlarge their understanding of slavery by using an international, transatlantic framework for comparison. The course strengthens analytical skills through extensive discussion as well as significant writing and research.