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Anadelia Romo

Dr. RomoOffice: TMH-210
Email: ar23@txstate.edu
Phone: 512.245.2123

Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Anadelia Romo received her B.A. in History from Princeton University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in History from Harvard University. Her area of specialty is Latin America and her research examines race in modern Brazil. She is also interested in the broader African diaspora in Latin America, with a particular focus on questions of race and inequality. Her latest research explores the intersections between modernist art and race in Brazil.

Dr. Romo’s first book, Brazil's Living Museum: Race, Reform and Tradition in Bahia (UNC Press, 2010), examines the discourse among Bahian intellectuals and state officials from the abolition of slavery in 1888 to the start of Brazil's military regime in 1964. In the book she uncovers how the state's nonwhite majority moved from being viewed as a source of embarrassment by the elite to being a critical component of Bahia's identity.

Her current book project, Viewing Brazil’s Racial Democracy: Modernism and the Iconography of Bahia’s Black Metropolis, reveals how the mid-century modernist movement in Bahia worked together with budding tourist promotions to establish a racialized visual culture that continues to dominate the city today. This project explores the tangled connections between race, representation, and tourism that have shaped the structure of modern racial inequality in Brazil. It recently earned the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH Faculty Grant, 2017).

Dr. Romo’s teaching has received multiple awards across the university. In 2007 she was awarded the Presidential Excellence in Teaching, an award granted to only one professor at the assistant level annually. In 2008 she was selected as one of ten favorite professors at the university for the PAWS Preview freshman orientation. In 2015 she was awarded the Presidential Excellence Award in Teaching for the College of Liberal Arts. She teaches courses in world and Latin American history at the undergraduate and graduate level. With a strong focus on primary source analysis and active learning, Dr. Romo encourages students to see history as a dynamic practice with room for debate.

Educational Background :
Ph.D. - Harvard University, 2004
M.A. - Harvard University, 1999
B.A. - Princeton University, 1996

Areas of Interest:
Latin America, Race, Modern Brazil, Afro-Latin America, Modernism, Inequality

Recent Research Topics :
Modernism and race in Brazil; racial ideas in Bahia, Brazil

Previous Publications

Books
Brazil's Living Museum: Race, Reform and Tradition in Bahia. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 2010.

Brazil’s Living Museum (Portuguese Translation). Accepted for publication in Portuguese translation by the press at the Universidade Federal da Bahia. Accepted, slated publication 2018.

(in progress) Viewing Brazil’s Racial Democracy: Modernism and the Iconography of Bahia’s Black Metropolis. This research project reveals how the mid-century modernist movement in Bahia helped consolidate national ideals of racial democracy in Brazil.

Refereed Articles and Book Chapters

“Reinventing Roots: From Athens to Africa in the Making of Salvador’s Identity.” In Axé Bahia: The Power of Art in an Afro-Brazilian Metropolis, edited by Patrick Polk, Sabrina Gledhill and Randall Johnson. Los Angeles, CA: Fowler Museum at UCLA, 2018.

“Writing Bahian Identity: Crafting New Narratives of Blackness in Salvador, Brazil, 1940s-50s.” Journal of Latin American Studies. Accepted for publication, 2017.

“O que é que a Bahia representa? Bahia’s State Museum and the Struggles to Define Bahian Culture.” Reprint of 2009 article published in Portuguese. In The Making of Brazil’s Black Mecca, edited by Bernd Reiter and Scott Ickes. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University Press, 2018 (in press).

"O que é que a Bahia representa? O Museu do Estado da Bahia e as disputas em torno da definição da cultura baiana (O que é que a Bahia representa? Bahia's State Museum and the Struggles to Define Bahian Culture)." Afro-Ásia 39 (2009): 115-152.

"Rethinking Race and Culture in Brazil’s First Afro-Brazilian Congress of 1934." Journal of Latin American Studies 39, no. 1 (2007): 31-54.

Awards and Accomplishments

  • President of Brazilian Studies Committee 2017, Conference of Latin American History (elected).
  • Secretary of Brazilian Studies Committee 2016, Conference of Latin American History (elected).
  • Invited adviser to the museum exhibit on display 2017-18, “The Roads that Lead to Bahia: Visual Arts and the Emergence of Brazil’s Black Rome,” Proposal funded by the Getty Foundation and organized by the John Fowler Museum at UCLA, spring 2014-present.
  • Texas State University Research Enhancement Grant 2005, 2007, 2016 (acceptance rate 30%)

Texas State University Teaching Awards
Presidential Excellence Award in Teaching, Liberal Arts College Award, Associate Professor level, 2014-2015
Presidential Excellence Award in Teaching, University Award, Assistant Professor level, 2006-2007 (one award granted annually)
Dean’s Golden Apple Award in Teaching, Assistant Professor level, 2006-2007 (one award granted annually)
Departmental nominee for Texas State University Presidential Excellence Award in Teaching 2005-2006, 2006-2007, 2014-15 (one nominee chosen annually by department at each rank)
Texas State University Department Travel and Research Grant 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2013, 2014
Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship 2003-2004
Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship (declined) 2003-2004
Harvard Mellon Fellowship 2002-2003, 2001-2002, 1999-2000
Fulbright Fellowship recipient (declined) 2001
Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship 2000-2001

Professional Memberships
AHA, American History Association
BRASA, Brazilian Studies Association
LASA, Latin American Studies Association


Courses Taught

HIST 2311 WORLD CIVILIZATION TO 1700
This course provides an overview of world cultures until the early 17th century. Students will gain a greater familiarity with cultures beyond their own and a broad, historically-informed international perspective. Student will be expected to think historically about the course material and engage in critical interpretations of primary and secondary sources. The course requires extensive analysis of primary sources, enabling students to participate in and reflect upon the practice of history.

HIST 2312 WORLD CIVILIZATION SINCE 1700
This course provides an overview of world cultures from the 14th century to the present. Students will gain a greater familiarity with cultures beyond their own and a broad, historically-informed international perspective. Student will be expected to think historically about the course material and engage in critical interpretations of primary and secondary sources. The course requires extensive analysis of primary sources, enabling students to participate in and reflect upon the practice of history.

HIST 4350A SLAVERY AND EMANCIPATION IN THE AMERICAS
This course examines Atlantic slavery and the societies that it shaped in the Americas. By focusing on the cases of Cuba, Brazil, and the United States it provides a broad and comparative context on the nature of slavery in the New World and analyzes the ways in which different structures of labor create different societies. The course also pays particular attention to the new culture in the Americas that arose from the forced migration of Africans. Discussion of primary and secondary texts, as well as critical writing, form a major component of this course.

HIST 4350E GENDER IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
This course surveys the role of gender in Latin American history, from pre-conquest to the present. It analyzes Latin American politics, culture, and economics, and gives particular attention to the creation and resistance of social norms. The objectives of this course are to emphasize the importance of gender in understanding the culture, economics, and politics of different societies at different historical moments and to expose students to a variety of historical approaches to gender in Latin America. The course strengthens analytical skills through extensive discussion and writing.

HIST 4399 SENIOR SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
This course is intended to make you think, research and write like a historian.  By the end of the semester you will produce a masterful twenty-page research paper that will show a thoughtful thesis, insightful sources, and provocative conclusions.  The subject of our research this semester will be modern Latin America, but reading of primary and secondary sources may be done in English.  Students may work on their choices of topics within modern Latin America.

HIST 5323A: SOCIETY AND CULTURE IN BRAZIL
This graduate reading seminar examines the social history of Latin America with a focus on modern Brazil from the nineteenth century forward.  Brazil severed its colonial ties and became independent in the nineteenth century like much of Latin America.  It distinguished itself, however, by a marked resistance to republicanism (forming the only empire in South America) and by a particularly extended reliance upon slavery, with final emancipation only in 1888.  Questions of political rights and racial justice have continued to dominate the history of the region to the present, and have created rich debates in the field of history.  Students will read broadly in the social and cultural history of Brazil and gain exposure to key historiographical debates, with special attention given to ideals of modernization and development.  This course provides an understanding of the diverse forces and tensions that have shaped Brazil's modern trajectory.

HIST 5323B: HISTORY OF RACE AND SLAVERY IN BRAZIL
This course assesses the literature on race relations and slavery in Brazil.  It situates the topic within a comparative, Atlantic framework and provides a critical understanding of the chief issues and debates in the field.  Students will begin with the development of slavery in colonial Brazil and its importance in the demographics of the colony.  We will then move on to examine the role of slavery in Brazil’s Empire, the causes for its exceptionally late abolition, and its continued legacy in Brazil.  In addition, the nature of race relations in Brazil will be critically assessed, from the colonial to contemporary era.  Students will gain a critical understanding of the particular nature of slavery and race in Brazil compared to other regions of the New World.

HIST 5324B AFRO-LATIN AMERICA 1800-2016: RACE AND REPRESENTATION
This graduate seminar surveys the African diaspora in Latin America, with a focus on shifting ideas of race, national inclusion, and representation.  Latin America imported more African slaves than any other part of the Americas, and its racial landscape forms an interesting comparison to that of the United States.  This course unravels the dynamics of inclusion and exclusion with a comparative framework that examines Afro-Latin America broadly, but with particular focus on Cuba, Brazil, and Colombia.  Further, it uses the arts and culture as a critical site for understanding these debates and unraveling the relationships between race and power.

HIST 5324C SLAVERY AND EMANCIPATION IN THE AMERICAS
This graduate seminar examines slavery in the Americas in its full social, political, and economic context. Students will enlarge their understanding of slavery by using an international, transatlantic framework for comparison. The course strengthens analytical skills through extensive discussion as well as significant writing and research.