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Rebecca Montgomery


Rebecca_Montgomery_editOffice: TMH-217
Email: rm53@txstate.edu
Phone: 512.245.2116


Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Montgomery is an alumnus of Southwest Texas State University who received her MA and PhD from the University of Missouri-Columbia. She taught in Georgia and Mississippi before returning to San Marcos. Her research and teaching interests lie primarily in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era United States, with emphasis on gender, race, and education in the New South. Several of her publications, including The Politics of Education in the New South: Women and Reform in Georgia, 1890-1930 (Louisiana State University Press, January 2006), have examined southern women's role in Progressive educational reform movements. Her current book project, a biography of educational reformer Celeste Parrish, examines the intersection of race and gender in shaping postbellum educational reform and the place of southern women within the larger national framework of Progressive political culture. This project has been funded by two Mellon Research Fellowships from the Virginia Historical Society and a university Research Enhancement Grant. Dr. Montgomery also is interested in the history of rural women. Her essay, "'We are Practicable, Sensible Women': The Missouri Women Farmers' Club and the Professionalization of Agriculture, 1900-1915," published in Women in Missouri History: In Search of Power and Influence, eds. Mary Neth and LeeAnn Whites (University of Missouri Press, 2004), examines the obstacles women farmers have faced in trying to lay claim to a fair share of public services aimed at promoting scientific commercial agriculture.

Areas of Interest: Gilded Age and Progressive Era, The New South, Education


Courses Taught

HIST 1310 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1877
A survey of United States social, cultural, economic, and political history from the beginning of European settlement through the Civil War and Reconstruction. It examines the historical events of colonization, the Revolution, nation-building, and the Civil War from diverse cultural perspectives. Much of course content focuses on the significance of gender, race, and ethnicity in the development of American identity, culture, and institutions, and how diverse groups have worked to expand American concepts of freedom and democracy.

HIST 1320 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 1877-PRESENT
A survey of United States social, cultural, economic, and political history from the end of Reconstruction to the present. Central themes include industrialization and the movements of dissent and reform that occurred in response, the impact of wars on domestic and foreign policy, the significance of the social movements of the 1960s, and changing concepts of the role of government. Much of course content focuses on the significance of gender, race, and ethnicity in the development of American identity, culture, and institutions, and how diverse groups have worked to expand American concepts of freedom and democracy.

HIST 3340 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 1877-1914
An advanced undergraduate lecture course that examines major historical themes from the end of Reconstruction through the beginning of the First World War. It examines the impact of westward expansion, industrialization, urbanization, and global economic competition, as well Americans’ conflicting notions of how citizenship, liberty, and democracy would be defined in the new social order.

HIST3368G DEMOCRACY AND EDUCATION
An advanced undergraduate lecture course that provides an overview of the relationship between democracy and education in the U.S. between 1865 and 1930, when emancipation, westward expansion, rural poverty, and growing immigrant and working-class populations motivated reassessment and reform of public education in an attempt to meet both individual and societal needs. It examines the tensions between democracy and education and the role of educators, parents, intellectuals, and philanthropists in addressing those tensions.

HIST3373C WOMEN IN RURAL AMERICA
An advanced undergraduate lecture course on the history of rural women in the U.S. from the founding of the nation to the present. Central topics include the structure of the rural household, the nature of women’s work in the agricultural economy, the scope of female influence in rural organizations, and the relationship between rural women and the state. The course examines what all rural women have in common as well as the ways in which their experiences diverge, and includes regional, national, and global perspectives.

HIST 5351A POLITICS AND REFORM IN THE PROGRESSIVE ERA
A graduate seminar exploring the interplay of domestic forces that shaped politics and reform movements between the 1890s and 1918. Readings generally take a social history approach in which class, race, ethnicity, gender, and regional difference are used as categories of analysis to explain the nature of change and the strengths and weaknesses of Progressivism as a democratic movement for reform.

HIST 5357 THE GILDED AGE
A graduate seminar on major themes in U.S. history between 1865 and 1900. These themes include: the rise of industrial capitalism and laissez faire ideology; the emergence of "outsider" worker and farmer movements and the "insider" political response; the development of new concepts of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality, and the ways in which these concepts shaped national identity as well as domestic and foreign policy; and the overlapping nature of economic, political, and social factors in influencing the transformation of American institutions and culture.