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Courses

Dr. Bryan Glass

History 4318S: Britain and the World
From the seventeenth century onward, the histories of Britain and the world became increasingly intertwined. Yet mainstream British history still neglects the world’s influence upon domestic developments, and British overseas history remains largely confined to the study of the British Empire. This course takes a broader approach, investigating Britain’s interactions with the wider world from 1688 to the present.

History 4350S: Piracy Through the Ages
An activity based on greed, and sometimes survival, piracy has existed since humans took to the seas. This course investigates the global history of piracy beginning with the Vikings. The history of piracy in the Caribbean, Asia, and the Mediterranean is covered and compared to the piracy of today.


Dr. Gary Hartman

History 3368R: History of Rock and Roll
This course traces the various ethnic, social, cultural, political, economic, and demographic forces in American society that helped shape Rock and Roll music. Students will also explore how this uniquely American cultural idiom mirrors the historical evolution of the United States in the second half of the twentieth century.

History 4376 / 5345: History of Texas Music
Examination of the evolution of music in Texas and the American Southwest, emphasizing how music reflects the richly diverse ethnic and cultural heritage of the region. It also considers the importance of ethnic identity and other social, political, and economic factors in shaping the Southwest, its people, and its music.


Dr. Bryan Mann

History 4318T: Special Topics in Roman/Medieval Britain
This course will investigate Roman and Medieval history related to the city of Chester, the Welsh Marches and the Northwest of England. Through readings, classroom discussions, close analysis of photos and videos of the sites, this course will detail the history of this problematic and often rebellious region.

History 4318U: Special Topics in Industrial Britain
This course will examine the physical impact that industrialization had on the Great Britain--bridges, canals, factories—and the cultural/ social effects on factory and seaside resort towns and ocean ports. The class will address what role did industrialization play in turning Britain into world’s dominant industrial and imperial power.

History 5309: Special Topics in Early Modern European History 1450-1815
A seminar based on selected topics in Early Modern European history. May be repeated with a different emphasis.


Dr. Jessica Pliley

HIST 3373 – Topics in Women’s History
This course surveys the history of European women from 1700 to present. We will examine how women’s roles both in the public and private spheres have been constructed; how ideas about motherhood have shaped the public and private roles of women and women’s citizenship; how women’s activism has drawn on arguments for equal rights on the one hand, and arguments for women’s unique obligations to the family on the other hand; and how women have influenced politics, even before they had the ballot. We will explore continuity in women’s reproductive labor even as women’s working lives have changed. Finally, the course will necessarily take a comparative approach, given that European women lived in different national, imperial, and ethnic contexts.

HIST 4350U – SLAVERIES: PAST & PRESENT

Recent research has revealed that today over 27 million people live in slavery today, constituting one of the single greatest human rights challenges of this century. President Obama declared, “Our fight against human trafficking is one of the great human rights causes of our time, and the United States will continue to lead it.” This course explores the significance of slavery in American history from the colonial period to today, from the emergence of racial slavery in the 17th century to human trafficking and modern-day slavery now. We will read the works of historians, journalists, and activists, as well as personal narratives of enslaved peoples of the past and the present.

HIST 5345 – WOMEN AND CITIZENSHIP
This course surveys the history of European women from 1700 to present, with a special focus on how citizenship has been constructed as a male right. We will examine how women’s roles both in the public and private spheres have been constructed; how ideas about motherhood have shaped the public and private roles of women and women’s citizenship; how women’s activism has drawn on arguments for equal rights on the one hand, and arguments for women’s unique obligations to the family on the other hand; and how women have influenced politics, even before they had the ballot. We will explore continuity in women’s reproductive labor even as women’s working lives have changed. Finally, the course will necessarily take a comparative approach, given that European women lived in different national, imperial, and ethnic contexts.