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News 2013

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Students Celebrate Eid Banquet

Students_Celebrate_Eid_Banquet_2013Texas State students celebrated their second "Eid Festival" on Thursday 7 November 2013. The Muslim Students' Association organized this evening of entertainment and learning, celebrating the Abrahamic faiths with henna tattoos and food.

Pursuing Texas State's mission as a university, we value diversity of people and ideas, a spirit of inclusiveness, a global perspective, and a sense of community as being essential elements of campus life.

The MSA acknowledges the generous support of the History Department, Anthropology Department, Philosophy Department, Sociology Department, and Center for Multicultural and Gender Studies.

History Department faculty member Dr. Elizabeth Bishop is advisor for the Muslim Students' Association. For information on future MSA events, please email her (eb26@txstate.edu).

Dressing Modern Maternity: The Frankfurt Sisters of Dallas and the Page Boy Label

Kay GoldmanKay Goldman, a Texas State History alumna, will speak Friday November, 15 at 10 a.m. in the Family and Consumer Sciences Building, room 158. She will discuss her 2013 book, Dressing Modern Maternity: The Frankfurt Sisters of Dallas and the Page Boy Label (Texas Tech University Press), winner of the Lou Halsell Rodenberger Prize in Texas History and Literature.

A coffee and reception, styled in the manner of promotions used by Page Boy, will begin at 9:30 a.m. A brief gallery talk and opportunity to view a Page Boy exhibition in the Historic Textiles and Apparel Gallery as well as a preview of new collection acquisitions will follow. Kay Goldman will be available to sign copies of the book at 11 a.m.

Model Arab League Star Delegate Moves on to United Nations

Nora_Lisa_Cavazos_MALRepresenting Texas State University, Nora Lisa Cavazos has garnered awards at Model Arab League (MAL) competitions in California, Massachusetts, and Texas. On the right in this photo from the recent Mills College competition in Oakland CA, she poses with MAL alumna Alanna Torrez.

The United States State Department chose Cavazos to intern with the U.S. Mission to the United Nations in New York, NY. She feels extremely honored to be one of seven participants, and the only one from Texas.

About her new responsibilities, Cavazos says: "I have been selected as an executive office intern for the 68th United Nations' General Assembly, where I will be working under the United States ambassadors while promoting democracy and American values." While at the UN, she hopes to learn more about foreign policy and the United Nations as a whole.

The MAL program is grateful to the History Department's ongoing support. Dr. Elizabeth Bishop, of the Department of History, mentors Texas State University's program; for further information, you can email her at eb26@txstate.edu.

Professor explores 200 years of African-American history with NEH

Posted by Jayme Blaschke
University News Service
August 12, 2013

Ronald Johnson, of the Department of History at Texas State University, recently participated in a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute hosted by the Georgia Historical Society (GHS) that explored two centuries of African-American life and culture in Savannah and Georgia's coastal islands.

Through scholarly lectures, site visits, community presentations and guided tours, Johnson, along with 22 other program participants, examined the centrality of place in the African-American experience in Georgia’s lowcountry and the larger Atlantic world.

“I wanted to be part of the GHS/NEH Summer Institute to expand my thinking and to enhance my teaching experience in the contentious areas of race relations and slavery in the United Sates,” said Johnson. “The city of Savannah, the people of the Georgia Lowcountry, and the research materials at the Georgia Historical Society have encouraged me to feature Savannah as a prominent place in my second book, which will examine religion and immigration in the United States during the 19th Century."

Johnson was chosen from more than one hundred applicants for the two-week institute, funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and selected as an NEH Summer Institute for 2013 which addressed broad themes of race and slavery in American history by focusing on site-specific experiences of communities in and around Savannah from the late 18th through the early 20th centuries. In addition to lectures from leading academics, participants were taken to Ossabaw and Sapelo Islands, the coastal community of Pin Point, and spent an afternoon at the location of “The Weeping Time,” Savannah’s Ten Broeck Race Course, where one of the largest sales of enslaved persons in U.S. history took place in 1859.

“It is important to bring these professors together to explore the history of the African-American experience and the Gullah-Geechee culture in particular,” said Stan Deaton, senior historian at GHS and program director for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Institute. “By bringing together experts in the field as well as the descendants and keepers of the Gullah-Geechee traditions, we can open up this part of American history in a very dynamic way, giving each of them the tools necessary to facilitate discussions in their own classrooms.”

For more information, contact Johnson at rj26@txstate.edu.

Cephas House, Eddie Durham Park dedications

berlageDr. Nancy Berlage visited the Cephas House at the recently dedicated Eddie Durham Park in San Marcos. She can be seen browsing various artifacts including a portrait of Ulysses Cephas. Cephas, a son of slaves, was born in San Marcos and went on to become a communty leader.

For more information, view the Statesman event coverage here.

Local Jazz Great Eddie Durham gets Historical Road Marker Thanks to History Graduate Student

As part of a class on Local and Community History taught by Mr. Dan Utley, Megan Galindo researched, documented and completed the application for a state historical marker to honor San Marcos native Eddie Durham. Although no funds were immediately available, recently the county marker chair, Dr. Betty Harrison (Texas State Education Department), learned that the Texas Historical Commission is taking care of the expense through a grant from its undertold marker program. The selection process is competitive, with only 14 topics from across the state chosen for the special funding. So, the county commission got a completed (and approvable) marker application, thanks to Megan, and a free marker thanks to the Texas Historical Commission. Additionally, the city got to fill in a gap in its historical narrative and, as a result of the process, lots of folks now have a better understanding of the value of public history.

Margerison named Piper Professor

McWilliams_Margerison_Piper_ProfessorThis month, President Trauth announced that History Professor Kenneth Magerison has been named a Piper Professor by the Minnie Stevens Piper Foundation. Each year the Foundation awards 10 professors from around the state this distinction. The awards are given to professors whose outstanding teaching has had a significant impact on their students and community.

History faculty and students have long known of Professor Margerison’s ability to mentor, challenge and educate students; we are thrilled to have him acknowledged with this prestigious award.

Freshman history major, Evan Ingersoll, won the grand prize at the Liberal Arts’ Majors event on Wednesday, April 10th

Evan Ingersoll The first-ever Post-PACE transition event for Liberal Arts majors has just concluded. We had a very successful turnout with 120 students coming and browsing the majors and university services available to them in Liberal Arts and across the campus. People too numerous to mention helped to ensure the event was coordinated and successful. So, “thank you” to everyone single one of you who helped bring this event to fruition. Please thank the individuals in your area who stepped up and assisted with the event. The door prize winners were:

2nd Prize – Bobcat Embroidered Messenger Bag = Dezmond K. Thomas

Grand Prize – Kona Dew Bicycle and Accessory Package from The Hub Bicycle Lounge, paid for by Dean and Academic Departments of Liberal Arts = Evan Ingersoll

Book Signing

Date/Time: April 17, 2013, 12:30 p.m.
Location: TMH 105, Swinney Conference Room

Join Dr. Elizabeth Makowski and Mr. Dan Utley for a book signing of their most recent publications.
Dr. Makowski will be signing, English Nuns and the Law in the Middle Ages.
Mr. Utley will be singing two recent publications, Faded Glory: A Century of Forgotten Texas Military Sites, Then and Now, & History along the Way: Stories Beyond the Texas Roadside Markers.

                                            Book_Signing_collage

Homefront as Battlefield: Reconsidering the Role fo Women in the Civil War - LeeAnn Whites

Guest lecturer Dr. LeeAnn Whites examines the many roles women played during the Civil War.

Dr. Whites is a Professor of History at the University of Missouri-Columbia, and author of:
The Civil War as a Crisis in Gender: Augusta, Georgia, 1860-1890 (1995)
Gender Matters: Civil War, Reconstruction, and the Making of the New South (2005)
Occupied Women: Gender, Military Occupation, and the American Civil War (2009)

Click here to view lecture.

The Real American Empire - A.G. Hopkins

What is the “American Empire”? While historically the term has been applied to both the colonial era and the age of the superpower dominance after 1945, it is both correct and incorrect. A perspective from imperial history compels a reassessment of the long period between 1783 and 1945. This lecture explores the acquisition of a territorial empire, the decolonization after 1945, and the misnomer of labeling the United States as an empire. It also delves into America as a superpower, and brings the discussion current by reviewing the invasion of Iraq, and how it was doomed to failure before it started.

Click here to view lecture.

The Curious Case of Mary Felton - Elizabeth Makowski

Dr. Elizabeth Makowski give her Ingram Professorship lecture.

The Middle English word ‘sometime’ might have been coined for Mary Felton (circa 13561398). At one point or another during her short life she was married to Edmund Hemgrave, Thomas Breton, Geoffrey Worsley, and John Curson , consecutively, though not always exclusively; she was also ‘sometime’ widow, mistress, divorcée, nun, apostate, and mother. Mary’s story parallels and finally surpasses that of her more famous contemporary, the Fair Maid of Kent, in terms of matrimonial intrigues and legal entanglements. In this article, I present some of my findings concerning the ecclesiastical response to Mary’s alleged apostacy in the context of her complex life.

Click here to view lecture.

The Intellectual Consequences of Decolonization - Stephen Howe

Between the 1940s and the 1970s the European colonial empires almost entirely disappeared. Theorists and advocates of the process - and of subsequent 'postcolonial' and 'decolonial' moments - believed this would or should be followed by a global intellectual transformation, a decolonization of minds and of being. Professor Howe asks how far and in what ways - mainly in the fields of historical and political studies - these expectations and hopes have been fulfilled.

Click here to view lecture.

Muslim Students' Association Sponsors 'Global Odyssey' Event

The Muslim Student Association promotes open dialogue at their fourth-annual “Hijab for a Day” event, the Global_Odyssey_Eventafternoon of 26 March 2013.

Fashion-forward MSA stylists offered a selection of modish scarves, transforming anyone who would like to see what it's like to wear hijab-- if only for a day. Texas State University is a public, student-centered, doctoral-granting institution dedicated to excellence in serving the educational needs of the diverse population of Texas and the world beyond.

In pursuing our mission as a university, we value diversity of people and ideas, a spirit of inclusiveness, a global perspective, and a sense of community as essential for campus life. The MSA program acknowledges the support of "A Global Odyssey: Exploring our Connections to the Changing World" Common Experience mini-grant.

Dr. Elizabeth Bishop is faculty advisor for this group; for information on future events, you can email her at eb26@txstate.edu.

Texas State Enjoys Moment in Sun at Bilateral Model Arab League in Houston

Ten Texas State students and a faculty member returned from the Bilateral University Model Arab League event at the University of Houston Honors College with awards. Ten universities (among them Louisiana State University, Stephen F. Austin State University, Texas A&M University, University of Arkansas - Little Rock, and the University of Houston - Clear Lake) were represented at the competition, which took place 16-17 February 2013.

The Bilateral US/Arab Chamber of Commerce and the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations organize these events at which students debate in five councils: Palestinian Affairs, Social Affairs, Political Affairs, Economic Affairs, and Joint Defense. At these competitions, students sharpened their skills in diplomacy and public speech. For this year's competition, Texas State students took the added challenge of representing Syria's government, and three individuals brought home honors

Bita Razavimaleki and Nora Lisa Cavazos received "Outstanding Delegation" for their representation of the Syrian Arab Republic on the Social Affairs council. Razavimaleki described one of the team's resolutions in response to the ongoing crisis in Syria: "While it had to convey the importance of human rights and security and safety of Syrian civilians, refugees and affected people in neighboring countries, we also had to preserve our rights and interests." She acknowledged, "It is a challenge to protect the rights of the country you represent in the Model and cooperate with other countries at the same time!"

Matt Korn received "Outstanding Chair" for his leadership of the Joint Defense council. Of his contribution, Korn remarked, "the role of the Chair is to ensure the Model runs smoothly." While delegates representing differing states worked together, Korn enjoined them to "craft well-written resolutions that address real-world situations."
Reflecting on this particular competition, he said; "I enjoy the chance to help this process and see the novel ways delegates propose to tackle these issues: delegates to the real Arab League might do well to follow some of their advice."

The MAL program acknowledges the support of the College of Education, the College of Liberal Arts, the Office of Equity and Access, the Anthropology Department, the History Department, and the Political Science Department. Dr. Elizabeth Bishop, of the Department of History, mentors Texas State University's program. For further information, you can email her at eb26@txstate.edu.

         Texas State Enjoys Moment in Sun at Bilateral Model Arab League in Houston  

Model Arab League Garners Awards at Northeast Regional University Model Arab League in Boston

Model Arab LeagueTen Texas State students and a faculty member returned from the Northeast Regional Model Arab League event at Northeastern University with awards. Nineteen universities (among them Bard College, Colby College, Converse College, Simmons College, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and two campuses of the University of Massachusetts in Boston and Lowell) were represented at the competition, which took place 2-4 November 2012.

The Bilateral US/Arab Chamber of Commerce and the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations organized this event, at which students debated in five councils: Palestinian Affairs, Social Affairs, Political Affairs, Economic Affairs, and Joint Defense. In this way, students sharpened their skills in diplomacy and public speech. For this year's competition, Texas State students took the added challenge of representing Syria's government, and four individuals brought honors back home. In alphabetical order, Nora Lisa Cavazos, Jay Judeh, Bita Razavimaleki, and Lauren Michelle Roig received "honorable mention" awards for their representation of this controversial country's regional policies.

When the Council of Social Affairs discussed media policy in member states regarding press freedom, shifts in digital, print, and new media, delegates Cavazos and Roig advanced a resolution "based on the concept of uniting Arab journalists, communicators, academia professionals." Cavazos explains, "to highlight the positive things happening in the Arab world. We felt that because bad press is always surrounding the Arab world, we need to change the perceptions of outsiders with insuring positive work from our very own region."

The MAL program acknowledges the support of the College of Education, the College of Liberal Arts, the Office of Equity and Access, the Anthropology Department, the History Department, and the Political Science Department. Dr. Elizabeth Bishop, of the Department of History, mentors Texas State University's program. For further information, you can email her at eb26@txstate.edu.

Dr. James McWilliams named Ingram Professor of History beginning Fall 2013

As the Ingram Professor of History, Dr. McWilliams will work on a book to be titled A Graceful Distance: The Cultural Origins of Animal Factory Farming in the United States, 1750-1906. This work ultimately demonstrates how the convergence of culture, science, and ideas influenced the human-animal bond in a critical way and at a critical time in American agricultural history.

Dr. McWilliams has been a member of the Texas State faculty since 2000, teaching Early American and Environmental history in the Department of History and in the Honors Program. He is the author of numerous articles, book chapters, and five previous books, including Just Food: Where Locavores Get it Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly (Little, Brown 2009) which won the 2009 Books for a Better Life Award. In 2009, he won both the Presidential Award for Scholarly Research and the Hiett Prize in the Humanities.

The Ingram Professorship, which carries a $10,000 research stipend, was established by Mrs. Callie Ingram and family to recognize a faculty member’s scholarly contribution to the discipline of history and to further the study of history at Texas State. Mr. Ralph Ingram, longtime senior lecturer in the department, explained that this professorship is another way to honor his father’s belief that education was the key to the future.