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The Indus Civilization of Pakistan and western India (2600-1900 BCE): New Discoveries on urbanism, trade and ideology

Location:
Taylor-Murphy History Building (TMH); Room 101
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Leah Renold
Campus Sponsor:
Department of History

The Department of History

presents

The Indus Civilization of Pakistan and Western India (2600-1900 BCE):
New Discoveries on Urbanism, Trade and Ideology

by

Jonathan Mark Kenoyer
Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin, Madison

This lecture on the Indus Civilization will focus on some of the most important new discoveries made at Harappa and other sites in Pakistan, India as well as in neighboring regions such as Oman. The new findings reveal a shift in perspectives on how the Indus Civilization emerged around 2600-1900 BC. We now know that the origins of this culture can be traced to much earlier periods along the Indus and adjacent regions. New discoveries indicate that different regions contributed to the emergence of early urban society, rather than just one site or area. Regional variations also suggest that this culture adjusted to different local environments and socio-economic and political developments. The shared character of the Indus cities can also be understood through the study of the distinctive technology, ornaments, textiles, ceramics, architecture, art and ideology. Between 1900-1000 BC the cities and settlements of this civilization began to change. Major issues that contributed to these changes will be discussed along with the important legacy of the Indus Civilization that has impacted later cultures and continues up to the present.

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The Gods of Indian Country: Religion and the Struggle for the American West

Location:
Taylor-Murphy History Building (TMH); Swinney Conference Room (TMH 105)
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Joshua Paddison
Campus Sponsor:
Department of History

The History Department

presents

Jennifer Graber

The Gods of Indian Country: Religion and the Struggle for the American West

Thursday, April 5, 2018 | 6:30-8:00 pm | TMH 105

During the nineteenth century, white Americans sought the cultural transformation and physical displacement of Native people. Though this process was certainly a clash of rival economic systems and racial ideologies, it was also a profound spiritual struggle. The fight over Indian Country sparked religious crises among both Natives and Americans. In "The Gods of Indian Country: Religion and the Struggle for the American West," Jennifer Graber tells the story of the Kiowa Indians during Anglo-Americans' hundred-year effort to seize their homeland. Like Native people across the American West, Kiowas had known struggle and dislocation before. But the forces bearing down on them -- soldiers, missionaries, and government officials -- were unrelenting. With pressure mounting, Kiowas adapted their ritual practices in the hope that they could use sacred power to save their lands and community.

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Center for the Study of the Soutwest

Houston Bound: Culture and Color in a Jim Crow City

Location:
Brazos Hall (BRAZ)
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Tammy Gonzales, 512.245.2224
Campus Sponsor:
The Center for the Study of the Southwest

The Center for the Study of the Southwest

presents

Dr. Tyina Steptoe

Dr. Steptoe will be hosting two events for the Center for the Study of the Southwest

Houston Bound: Culture and Color in a Jim Crow City
Reception | Q&A | Book Sale + Signing
February 22 | 12:30 pm | Brazos Hall

and

History in the Key of Life: Listening to Houston’s Polycultural Pasts
Reception | Talk | Q&A
February 22 | 6:00 pm | Calaboose African American Museum, 200 W. MLK Drive

Tyina Steptoe is an associate professor in the Department of History at the University of Arizona in Tucson. She earned a PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She completed her undergraduate work at the University of Texas at Austin, where she received a BS in Radio-Television-Film and a BA in History.

Steptoe’s work focuses on race, gender, and popular culture in the United States. Her book, Houston Bound: Culture and Color in a Jim Crow City (2016),won theKenneth Jackson Award for Best Book (North American) from the Urban History Association, the W. Turrentine Jackson Book Prize from the Western History Association, and the Julia Ideson Award from the Friends of the Texas Room at the Houston Metropolitan Research Center. Her writing has also been published in the American Quarterly, Journal of African American History, Journal of the West, Oxford American, and the Houston Chronicle.

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