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History Department

Arab Cyborgs: The Post-Humanist Narrative of Return in al-Shanfara and Huda Barakat

Mar 02, 7:00PM - 9:00PM
Arab Cyborgs: The Post-Humanist Narrative of Return in al-Shanfara and Huda BarakatTarek El-Ariss
presents

Arab Cyborgs: The Post-Humanist Narrative of Return in al-Shanfarā and Hudā Barakāt"

Tarek El-Ariss is UT/Austin's specialist in contemporary Arabic letters, visual culture, and new media; he's also one of the leading contributors to the growing field of "Queer Arab studies," and associate editor of the Journal of Arabic Literature.

(al-Shanfarā was a pre-Islamic poet; Barakāt is a Lebanese novelist active during that country's civil war.
Location:
Cost:
Free
Campus Sponsor:
Department of English, Center for Diversity and Gender and the Department of History
Contact:
[add to your calendar]

Presencias Urgentes: Latino Communities and the 25th Anniversary of the ADA

Mar 06, 1:00PM - 5:00PM
Presencias Urgentes: Latino Communities and the 25th Anniversary of the ADALatino communities in the USA have become increasingly present in the last 25 years, making Latino demands, needs, and desires an important part of American culture. Disabilities are an important part of life and a focus on disability and race can expand our understanding of the history and culture of the United States.

This is the 25th anniversary of a key moment in civil rights and American citizenship: the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. This symposium – Presencias Urgentes – will focus on Latino participation in this broad shift in American culture.

By discussing the links Americans make between bodies, culture, and citizenship, the panelists in Presencias Urgentes seek to make disabilities more present in our perceptions of the world, our injuries, our abilities, our families, our movements, our histories, the institutions we share, and the journeys we take.

Location:
Cost:
Free
Campus Sponsor:
Department of History
Contact:
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American Soldiers, Panpan girls, and Sexual Danger in US-Occupied Japan, 1945-1952

Mar 24, 3:30PM - 5:00PM
American Soldiers, Panpan girls, and Sexual Danger in US-Occupied Japan, 1945-1952American Soldiers, Panpan girls, and Sexual Danger
in
US-Occupied Japan

Robert Kramm,
The Swiss Institute of Technology

Sex sold well in U.S. occupied Japan. In Tokyo alone about fifty-to-seventy thousand sex workers catered to American servicemen during the occupation period (1945-1952). Young women contemporarily known as “panpan girls,” “women of the night” (yoru no onna), or “streetwalkers” became—both in numbers and visibility—the most prominent agents of sex work in postwar Japan. American occupiers heatedly debated efforts to control those young women, who were perceived as the main source of venereal disease and would thus pose a threat to the health and morale of the occupation troops. Japanese administrators and feminist anti-prostitution activists likewise uttered their concern about Japan’s public morals and social stability. Japanese journalists, academics, writers, and photographers also showed much interest in the “panpan girl,” who became a protagonist in novels and short stories, and photographic images of her circulated in Japanese newspapers and journals. Although some
saw liberating potential in the streetwalking prostitute—socially, morally, and sexually—, in general, the panpan became object of a spectatorship of “sexual danger” (J. Walkowitz) that oscillated between interest and anxiety, fascination and repulsion, desire and stigma. Within this discourse, the figure of the panpan was nevertheless a constitutive signifier of loss and decay to imagine a better Japan for those desperate to overcome Japan’s post-surrender despair.
Location:
Comal (CMAL); Room 116
Cost:
Free
Campus Sponsor:
Department of History
Contact:
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The Life and Music of MANUEL “COWBOY” DONLEY

Apr 16, 6:30PM - 9:00PM
In June 2014, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded Manuel “Cowboy” Donley the National Heritage Fellowship in recognition of his contributions to American music. Performing in Austin since the 1940s, Donley’s career reflects the rich history of Mexican-American music in Texas from traditional ballads to orquesta tejana and even the electrical amplification of rock ‘n’ roll. Join the Wittliff and the Center for Texas Music History for an evening of conversation, performance, and celebration with musicians and scholars Evaliza Fuentes, Kim Simpson, and Cowboy Donley.

Location:
Cost:
free
Campus Sponsor:
The Wittliff Collections and the Center for Texas Music History
Contact:
Kathleen O'Keefe, 512-245-6465
[add to your calendar]