Common Experience Calendar 2006 - 2007

2006: October | November
2007: January | February | March | April

 

September 11, 2006

Gandhi
University Seminar Film Series

6:30pm, Alkek Teaching Theater

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September 12, 2006

Zoot Suit (The Hollywood Film version)
This is the film stars Edward James Olmos, who is the featured speaker for the Fall 2006 Common Experience. Zoot Suit is a landmark Latino work from the pre-indie period, directed by Luis Valdez, who will be on the Texas State campus September 20th. Valdez's brother, Daniel Valdez, plays the hero but the big draw here is the sensational performance of Edward James Olmos. A brooding actor just beginning his screen career, Olmos plays a flamboyant, hectoring, all-seeing figure called El Pachuco.

8:15pm, Recital Hall - Music Building -- Seating is limited (150 seats)!

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September 14, 2006

The Bajío Project

The Bajío Project is a 60-minute documentary shot primarily in Mexico. It covers the impact of globalization on migration trends and how migration has impacted the women of the Bajío Region in Mexico. The documentary will cover critical issues such as micro enterprising as a new economy in Mexico, the changing role of women within the community, and how we understand the United States from the Mexican perspective. -- The documentary will be aired and will be followed by a question-and-anser session with two of the filmmakers, Martina Guzman and Monique Velasquez.

6:30-8:30pm, Centennial Hall Teaching Theater

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September 14, 2006

Dr. John Carlos

A presentation for the university community.

7pm LBJSC Ballroom

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September 15, 2006

Exhibit Reception for Latino Presence

The exhibit will feature memorabilia and information about the Latino faculty, staff and students who have been a part of the Texas State community over the last 100 years. The reception will be an opportunity for individuals to see the exhibit while also enjoying some light refreshments.

5-7pm Alkek Library

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September 16, 2006

Dr. John Carlos
Keynote luncheon speaker.

This luncheon is free and open to the public.

Noon, LBJSC Ballroom

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September 18, 2006

Milagro Beanfield War
SACA Film Series

7pm, LBJ Teaching Theater

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September 18-22, 2006

Dissenting Voices: Philosophy Dialogue Series

Tuesday, Sept. 19, 12:30pm, 126 Psychology Bldg.: Exemplars of Nonviolent Protest: Gandhi, King, and Thoreau, Open Dialogue with Sophists and Sages

Tuesday, Sept. 19, 3:30pm, 126 Psychology Bldg.: Nonviolence in a Violent World: The Dissenting Voice of Gandhi by Prof. Peter Siegenthaler, History

Wednesday, Sept. 20, 12:00noon, 126 Psychology Bldg.: This Dialogue Will Offend You: Comedy as Social Criticism by Sean Wardwell, Mass Comm major

Thurdsay, Sept. 21, 12:30pm, 126 Psychology Bldg.: Feminists before Feminism, Open Dialogue with Sophists and Sages

Friday, Sept. 22, 12:00noon, 126 Psychology Bldg.: Gender Identity by Prof. Rebekah Ross-Fountain, Philosophy

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September 20, 2006

Luis Valdez
American playwright and film director will speak about his play Zoot Suit and the infamous "Pachuco Riots" that unfolded during WWII.

7pm, Evans Auditorium

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September 25, 2006

Shostakovich Mini-Symposium
Composer D. Shostakovich -- "A mini-symposium with presentations by Paul Cohen, Nico Schüler, and Theron Stimell

4:30 - 6pm, Recital Hall (Music Building): Free admission

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September 28, 2006

Zoot Suit (The Hollywood Film version)
This is the film stars Edward James Olmos, who is the featured speaker for the Fall 2006 Common Experience. Zoot Suit is a landmark Latino work from the pre-indie period, directed by Luis Valdez, who will be on the Texas State campus September 20th. Valdez's brother, Daniel Valdez, plays the hero but the big draw here is the sensational performance of Edward James Olmos. A brooding actor just beginning his screen career, Olmos plays a flamboyant, hectoring, all-seeing figure called El Pachuco.

7pm, Alkek Teaching Theatre

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October 2, 2006

Edward James Olmos
Award-Winning Hispanic American Actor, Producer, and Civic Activist.

Known as the "Olivier of the Latino world," Edward James Olmos is an individual flowing with talent and creativity. The multi-talented actor, producer, director, and community activist was born and raised in East Los Angeles and spent many years in theatrical roles until his mesmerizing performance in the musical play Zoot Suit, which led to a Tony Award nomination. He later recreated the role for film and went on to star in such films as Wolfen and Blade Runner. He then scored a personal success with his role as a Mexican cowboy in The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez, directed by Robert M. Young, who also directed Olmos in Saving Grace, Triumph of the Spirit, Talent for the Game, and Caught. Olmos recently starred as Jess Gonzalez, a Korean War veteran, on the PBS show American Family, but can now be seen as Commander Adama on the Sci-Fi Channel series Battlestar Galactica. He recently directed the HBO film Walkout, based on a true story about a young activist who decides in 1968 to stage a walkout of 10,000 Latino students from five East Los Angeles high schools in protest of educational conditions and complaints of anti-Mexican educational bias. - In April 1999, Olmos launched a nationwide multimedia project called Americanos: Latino Life in the United States, a celebration of Latino culture through photography, film, music, and the printed word. The project is co-sponsored by Time Warner Inc., and is designed to inspire Latino pride and to build bridges among Latinos and others. Americanos includes a five-year traveling photography exhibition organized by the Smithsonian Institution; a music CD featuring Latino artists; a documentary to air on HBO; and a book of essays, photos, and commentary by today's most notable figures in the Hispanic community co-edited by Olmos. - In 1997, Olmos starred as Abraham Quintanilla in the much-anticipated Warner Bros. feature film release of Selena. He also starred in the acclaimed film 12 Angry Men for Showtime television, directed by William Friedkin. - In 1996, he starred in the ABC miniseries Dead Man's Walk, which was the prequel to Lonesome Dove. He also completed the movie The Limbic Region, and starred in the critically acclaimed Sony Pictures Classic thriller Caught.

8pm, LBJSC Mall

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October 3, 2006

Tomás Rivera Documentary
The Tomás Rivera Documentary honors the 10th anniversary of the Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children's Book Award, established by Texas State's College of Education to encourage more children's books that "authentically depict the lives of Mexican Americans." It features conversations with all the authors and illustrators who have won the award and tells the story of Tomás Rivera. It also includes an interview with Dr. Rosalinda Barrera.

7pm, San Marcos Public Library (Large Meeting Room)

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October 4, 2006

Syrianna
SACA Film Series

7pm, LBJ Teaching Theater

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October 5, 2006

The Guantanamo Teach-In: A National Teach-In
A Project of Seton Hall University Law School

10am to 6pm, Location TBA

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October 10, 2006

Zoot Suit (The Hollywood Film version)
This is the film stars Edward James Olmos, who is the featured speaker for the Fall 2006 Common Experience. Zoot Suit is a landmark Latino work from the pre-indie period, directed by Luis Valdez, who will be on the Texas State campus September 20th. Valdez's brother, Daniel Valdez, plays the hero but the big draw here is the sensational performance of Edward James Olmos. A brooding actor just beginning his screen career, Olmos plays a flamboyant, hectoring, all-seeing figure called El Pachuco.

8:15pm, Recital Hall - Music Building -- Seating is limited (150 seats)!

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October 14, 2006

Tejano Leadership in Mexican and Revolutionary Texas
Symposium

October 2006 will mark the 200th birthday of Juan Seguín, the leading Tejano military figure of the Texas Revolution. In recognition of the anniversary, a one-day symposium on Tejano leaders of that era will be held. While the names of Stephen F. Austin, Sam Houston, William Travis and other Anglo-American leaders of the period are well known, the names of Tejano political, economic, and military leaders of the time are all but unknown. The goal of the conference is to present papers on a select group of Tejanos who had a major impact on the development of Texas in the period from Mexican independence in 1821 through the Republic era (1836-1845). The idea is to present the history of Mexican Texas from the Tejano perspective, employing a collective biographical approach.

8:15am - 5pm, LBJSC Teaching Theater

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October 14, 2006

Fiesta de Cien Anos

The Fiesta de Cien Anos will be the culminating activity for the Latino Presence Celebration and Hispanic Heritage Month. The event will include an evening of food, entertainment and dancing.

6-9 pm, LBJSC Ballroom

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October 16, 2006

Dr. John Schmidt: "Adolf Fuchs: A German Pioneer Composer in Texas"

Music Lecture Series. Abstract: Among the nearly 30,000 German immigrants who arrived in Texas during the 1840s and 1850s were the Lutheran pastor Adolf Fuchs and his family, who settled in Cat Spring, northwest of Houston, in 1846. He had deplored the political situation in Germany of that day, with its unequal division of wealth and property, its overpopulation, and the resulting poverty of many of its residents. Fuchs also had grown increasingly frustrated with the organized church in Germany, and abandoned his clerical calling when he left, supporting his family as a teacher and farmer. He was close friends with the revolutionary poet Hoffmann von Fallersleben, and had periodically sheltered him from charges of treason. Hoffmann, the author of "Deutschland über alles," briefly considered joining with the Fuchs family in emigrating to Texas. -- Fuchs was an accomplished singer and an active composer, and a manuscript of 52 Lieder, duets, and partsongs has survived in several copies. Most songs are in German, setting poems by classical poets; others treat several of Hoffman von Fallersleben's Texanische Lieder and some of Fuchs's own poems, giving a real flavor of pioneer life in Texas, and celebrating the freedoms that were denied them in Germany.

8:00pm, Music Building Recital Hall

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October 17, 2006

Debate - The LBJ Debate Society

The LBJ Debate Society is hosting a debate on the following resolution: This House Believes dissent in the public sphere should be an essential guardian of democracy. This will be a town hall type debate with a set of primary debaters. The audience will also have a chance to participate.

6 pm, G02 Centennial Hall

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October 24, 2006

Thomas Patterson: Why Americans Have Come to Dislike Elections and Mistrust the Media

Thomas Patterson is Bradlee Professor of Government and the Press at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. His most recent book, The Vanishing Voter, looks at the causes and consequences of declining electoral participation. -- This event is presented by SACA.

6-9 pm, Alkek Teaching Theater

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October 25, 2006

David Redmon: Mardi Gras: Made in China
David Redmon studied visual sociology at the State University of New York Mardi Gras: Made in China is his first documentary. He is currently completing Alvar Street: A Neighborhood in Post-Katrina New Orleans and Intimidad with producer Ashley Sabin. Ashley Sabin graduated from the Pratt Institute in 2005 with a degree in Art History. She is currently co-directing two documentaries (see above) with David Redmon. -- The award winning documentary Mardi Gras: Made in China swiftly follows the path of Mardi Gras beads from the naked streets of New Orleans during Carnival, where revelers party 24/7, to the disciplined factories in Fuzhou, China, where teenage laborers live and thread beads 24/7. Told with humor and curiosity, Mardi Gras: Made in China provides a global connection by introducing workers and revelers to each other through a disposable commodity: Mardi Gras beads. Mardi Gras: Made in China is the winner of 18 domestic (U.S.) and International awards and has been nominated for Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary at the Sundance Film Festival. Visit also http://www.mardigrasmadeinchina.com

7:00 pm, Centennial Hall Teaching Theater

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October 26, 3-5pm

The Fine Art of Protest and Dissent - Exhibition Opening

The turbulence generated by the historically complex relationship between Mexican culture and US culture has inspired many of the images in this exhibit of original serigraphs in the new Gallery of Common Experience. The exhibit displays 32 of the more than 150 prints created through the Austin non-profit Serie Project, Inc., founded by artist Sam Coronado in 1993. Gaspar Enriquz' signature piece (as seen on this poster) seems to express both cultural pride and defiance -- not unlike the stance of the Zoot Suiter's (in reference to the signature reading for this year's Common Experience). The exhibit was curated and hung by a Common Experience student group, working with Art & Design lecturer Linda Kelsey-Jones: Orquidea Morales, Jodi Flores, Michelle Sotolongo, Louie D'Valencia, Nicholas Klein, Katie Abott, Jennifer Miesse, Melarie Benson, and Reagan Pugh. Specific prints were selected to reflect the concerns of both the Common Experience theme of Protest and Dissent and to support this year's Celebration of the Latino Presence on Campus. -- Sam Coronado will talk about the artists and their works and discuss his mission to support and promote Hispanic and other diverse artists through the Serie Project at the opening reception, Thursday, October 26, 3-5 p.m. The Gallery of the Common Experience is located in the Mitte Honors Coffee Forum in the Lampasas Building. The exhibit will be on display through December 15, and is open Mondays through Fridays from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Mitte Honors Forum, Lampasas Building

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November 1-4, 2006

Race, Ethnicity, and Place Conference

For more information, click HERE.

Please see website for specific times and locations.

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November 2, 2006

Hettie Jones

Activist, editor, poet, and author Hettie Jones, one of the founding figures of the Beat Movement of the 1950s, is best known for her memoir How I Became Hettie Jones, which chronicles her years with former husband Amiri Baraka and her own growing desires as an artist. Jones has also published such works as Drive, an award-winning collection of poetry, Aliens at the Border, a collection of poetry published by female prisoners, and No Woman, No Cry: My Life with Bob Marley, which she wrote with Marley's widow, Rita Marley.

5:00pm, Mitte Honors Coffee House

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November 7-11 and 14-18, 2006

The Rocky Horror Show

Musical by Richard O'Brian, directed by Jay Jennings. Tickets $10 & $5 student, Theatre Box Office 512.245.2204. -- Is everyone ready to do the time warp again? This campy, cult classic immortalized on film is even more enjoyable in a live performance! Join Bard and Janet as they stumble into the strange world of the castle of Dr. Frank-N-Furter, that sweet transvestite who is cooking up his latest creation, Rocky. Rocky Horror is an audience-participation musical that pays kitschy homage to 1950s sci-fi B-movies wiht a winking nod at the sexual revolution. For mature audiences. -- For more information, contact the Theatre and Dance Departmental Office at 512-245-2147.

7:30pm, Main Stage - Theatre Building

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November 13, 2006

"Music and Revolution: Cultural Change in Socialist Cuba"
A Lecture by Dr. Robin D. Moore, University of Texas at Austin

This public lecture (free admission) provides an introduction to the most prominent artists and musical styles that have emerged in Cuba since 1959 and to the policies that have shaped artistic life. Robin D. Moore will give the audience an overview of the first decades after the Cuban Revolution, documenting the many ways performance has changed and emphasizing the close links between political and cultural activity. The speaker will describe how the fall of the Soviet Union has affected Cuba in material, ideological, and musical terms and considers the effect of tense international relations on culture. Most importantly, the lecture will chronicle how the arts have become a point of negotiation between individuals, with their unique backgrounds and interests, and official organizations. It uses music to explore how Cubans have responded to the priorities of the revolution and have created spaces for their individual concerns. -- Dr. Robin D. Moore is Associate Professor of Music History at the University of Texas at Austin and the author of books on Nationalizing Blackness: Afrocubanismo and Artistic Revolution in Havana, 1920-1940 (1997) and Music and Revolution: Cultural Change in Socialist Cuba (2006).

6pm, Music Building Recital Hall

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November 14, 2006

Protest & Dissent: Immigration - A Panel Discussion

Curious about what compelled groups to rally at the capital this spring? The RRHEC is proud to host a panel discussion of the theme "protest and dissent" by focusing on immigration -- a subject that provokes passionate responses. Representatives from the community will be sharing their diverse viewpoints on the issue and university professors will weigh in on the philosophical influences and the economic impact. Panelists include: Roberto "Bob" Bailon (owner of a private consulting company and member of the Brazos River Authority Board of Directors), Jim Harrington (Director of the Texas Civil Rights Project), Dr. Jack Mogab (Director of the Center for Latin American Commerce), Dr. Jeffrey Gordon (Professor of Philosophy at Texas State University-San Marcos), and Dr. Jorge Valadez (writer and Professor of Philosophy at Our Lady of the Lake University). This is an interactive event and questions from the audience will be encouraged. Join us in this community discussion.

7:00-8:30pm, Round Rock Higher Education Center, Avery Building Theatre, Room 252

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November 15, 2006

Hotel Rwanda
SACA Film Series


7pm, LBJ Teaching Theater

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November 18, 2006

Pastures of Plenty: The Music of Woody Guthrie
This full concert work, created by Bill and Livia Vanaver is a celebration in music, song, and dance of Woody Guthrie the balladeer, and Woody Guthrie the man. For more information, visit the Supple Folk Series website.


7:30pm, Evans Auditorium - General $10 / Students $5

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January 17, 2007

"If MLK Could Walk a Mile Today"
23rd Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemoration Celebration

The Calaboose Museum of African American History, located at 200 Martin Luther King, will be open all day and is free to the public. The museum offers a unique look at the roles that African Americans have played in law, medicine, science, and exploration. -- On campus events include a faculty and staff (invitation-only) luncheon from 12:00 to 1:30 pm in the LBJ Student Center, a candle light march at 6:30 pm that begins at the LBJ Ballroom and continues to Evans auditorium where the celebration program will be held from 7:00 to 8:30 pm.

Calaboose Museum of African American History, LBJ Student Center, & Evans Auditorium

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January 23, 2007

Zoot Suit (The Hollywood Film version)
This is the film stars Edward James Olmos, who was the featured speaker for the Fall 2006 Common Experience. Zoot Suit is a landmark Latino work from the pre-indie period, directed by Luis Valdez, who will be on the Texas State campus September 20th. Valdez's brother, Daniel Valdez, plays the hero but the big draw here is the sensational performance of Edward James Olmos. A brooding actor just beginning his screen career, Olmos plays a flamboyant, hectoring, all-seeing figure called El Pachuco.

7:00pm, Centennial Hall

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January 25, 2007

An Inconvenient Truth
SACA Film Series

Al Gore has traveled the world delivering a presentation on the global climate change, proving that humankind must confront global warming now or face devastating consequences--this film captures his journey as a worldwide environmental champion.

7:00pm, LBJ Ballroom

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January 26 - February 28, 2007

Voting Rights: The Struggle in the South" [1963-1964]
Civil Rights Exhibition

A photography exhibit in the Gallery of the Common Experience located in the Mitte Honors Program in Lampasas 407 is featuring the work of photographer Matt Herron. Titled "Voting Rights: The Struggle in the South," the powerful pictures make visible the central issue of the Civil Rights Movement. Taken in Selma, Alabama, where only 2% of eligible black voters had managed to register by 1964, Herronís pictures depict voter intimidation and efforts to resist the intimidation. His work won the World Press Photo Contest in Brussels in 1966 for Best New Photograph, and has been featured in Life, Look, Time, Newsweek, and the Saturday Evening Post. -- Also on exhibit are two paintings by Texas State students Joshua-Scott Clements and Christopher Reckner as well as a pictorial tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr., borrowed from San Marcos community archives.

9am to 8pm daily; Mitte Honors Forum, Lampasas 407; free admission

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January 29, 2007

Eyes on the Prize Series - Part I & II
Film Series

Part I: Awakenings (1954-1956). Individual acts of courage inspire black Southerners to fight for their rights: Moses Wright testifies against the white men who murdered young Emmett Till, and Rosa Parks refuses to give up her bus seat to a white man in Montgomery, Alabama. -- Part II: Fighting Back (1957-1962). States' rights loyalists and federal authorities collide in the 1957 battle to integrate Little Rock's Central High School, and again in James Meredith's 1962 challenge to segregation at the University of Mississippi. Both times, a Southern governor squares off with a U.S. president, violence erupts -- and integration is carried out.

7:00pm, Alkek Teaching Theatre; free admission

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January 29, 2007

Protest & Dissent: German Workers' Songs of the Late 1920s and Early 1930s
Music Lecture Series, with Dr. Nico Schüler, musicologist, and Sunnie Oh, pianist.

A strong movement against political and economic hardship developed during the late 1920s and early 1930s in Germany. Part of this movement was a strong Worker’s Music Movement. This lecture-recital will give insights into this movement and the songs written for it. Several musical examples will support the historical explanations.   

8:00pm, Recital Hall (Music Building); free admission

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January 31, 2007

Zoot Suit (The Hollywood Film version)
This is the film stars Edward James Olmos, who was the featured speaker for the Fall 2006 Common Experience. Zoot Suit is a landmark Latino work from the pre-indie period, directed by Luis Valdez, who will be on the Texas State campus September 20th. Valdez's brother, Daniel Valdez, plays the hero but the big draw here is the sensational performance of Edward James Olmos. A brooding actor just beginning his screen career, Olmos plays a flamboyant, hectoring, all-seeing figure called El Pachuco.

7:30pm, Recital Hall - Music Building

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February 1, 2007

Berkeley in the 60s
US 1100 - Film

The 1960s alumni of the Berkeley campus tell their stories about how the quiet school became the site of massive political activism on the part of students fighting for their right of political expression on campus and then against the Vietnam War.

7:00pm, Centennial Hall; free admission

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February 5, 2007

German Protest Songs before World War II
Dr. Nico Schüler, School of Music

An event of the Philosophical Dialogue Series. For additional information please contact Ms. Beverly Pairett in the Department of Philosophy at (512) 245-2285.

12:00pm, Psychology Building, Room 132 (Dialogue Room)

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February 5, 2007

Eyes on the Prize Series - Part III & IV
Film Series

Part III: Ain't Scared of Your Jails (1960-1961). Black college students take a leadership role in the civil rights movement as lunch counter sit-ins spread across the South. "Freedom Riders" also try to desegregate interstate buses, but they are brutally attacked as they travel. -- Part IV: No Easy Walk (1961-1963). The civil rights movement discovers the power of mass demonstrations as the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. emerges as its most visible leader. Some demonstrations succeed; others fail. But the triumphant March on Washington, D.C., under King's leadership, shows a mounting national support for civil rights. President John F. Kennedy proposes the Civil Rights Act.

7:00pm, Alkek Teaching Theatre; free admission

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February 6, 2007

Words Mightier Than the Sword: Political Satire as Protest and Dissent
Sophists and Sages (Student Presenters, Philosophy Dialogue Class)

An event of the Philosophical Dialogue Series. For additional information please contact Ms. Beverly Pairett in the Department of Philosophy at (512) 245-2285.

1:00pm, Psychology Building, Room 132 (Dialogue Room)

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February 7, 2007

Dissent and Dissenters: From Left to Right and Back Again
Dr. Gwynne Ash, Curriculum & Instruction

An event of the Philosophical Dialogue Series. For additional information please contact Ms. Beverly Pairett in the Department of Philosophy at (512) 245-2285.

2:00pm, Psychology Building, Room 132 (Dialogue Room)

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February 7, 2007

9/11: The Official View and the Alternatives
Will Compton, Biology major

An event of the Philosophical Dialogue Series. For additional information please contact Ms. Beverly Pairett in the Department of Philosophy at (512) 245-2285.

3:00pm, Psychology Building, Room 132 (Dialogue Room)

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February 7, 2007

The Continuing Importance of African American History Month
A Lecture by Lonnie Bunch, Founding Director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture

Mr. Bunch previously served as president of the Chicago Historical Society, Associate Director for curatorial affairs at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, Education Specialist with the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, and Curator of History for the California African American Museum in Los Angeles. He has written several books, including the exhibition catalog The American Presidency: A Glorious Burden (2000).

6:30pm, Flowers Hall 341

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February 8, 2007

Satire from Juvenal to Jon Stewart
Sophists and Sages (Student Presenters, Philosophy Dialogue Class)

An event of the Philosophical Dialogue Series. For additional information please contact Ms. Beverly Pairett in the Department of Philosophy at (512) 245-2285.

11:00am, Psychology Building, Room 132

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February 12, 2007

Voting Rights: The Struggle in the South" [1963-1964]
Civil Rights Exhibition & Presentation

A photography exhibit in the Gallery of the Common Experience located in the Mitte Honors Program in Lampasas 407 is featuring the work of photographer Matt Herron. Titled "Voting Rights: The Struggle in the South," the powerful pictures make visible the central issue of the Civil Rights Movement. Taken in Selma, Alabama, where only 2% of eligible black voters had managed to register by 1964, Herronís pictures depict voter intimidation and efforts to resist the intimidation. His work won the World Press Photo Contest in Brussels in 1966 for Best New Photograph, and has been featured in Life, Look, Time, Newsweek, and the Saturday Evening Post. -- Also on exhibit are two paintings by Texas State students Joshua-Scott Clements and Christopher Reckner as well as a pictorial tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr., borrowed from San Marcos community archives. -- A reception for Matt Herron will take place in the Mitte Honors Forum (Lampasas 407), where his show is exhibited through the end of February. The reception will be held February 12, 2007, from 4-6 p.m., and Matt Herron will talk about his work and show additional slides. Afterwards, at 6 p.m. in the Alkek Teaching Theatre, the Eyes on the Prize documentary will feature "Mississippi: Is This America (1963-1964)." There, at 7 p.m., Matt Herron will talk about his photographs in the film and take questions. Following from 8-9 p.m., another Eyes on the Prize film will be shown" "Bridge to Freedom."

4-6pm; Mitte Honors Forum, Lampasas 407; free admission

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February 12, 2007

Eyes on the Prize Series - Part V & VI
Film Series

Part V: Mississippi: Is This America? (1963-1964). Mississippi's grass-roots civil rights movement becomes an American concern when college students travel south to help register black voters and three activists are murdered. The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party challenges the regular Mississippi delegation at the Democratic Convention in Atlantic City. -- Part VI: Bridge to Freedom (1965). A decade of lessons is applied in the climactic and bloody march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. A major victory is won when the federal Voting Rights Bill passes, but civil rights leaders know they have new challenges ahead.

7:00pm, Alkek Teaching Theatre; free admission

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February 15, 2007

Andrea Powell and MTV Exit: End Exploitation and Trafficking
Film showing and discussion: Texas State and Honors Alumna Andrea Powell, Co-Founder of FAIR Fund, will introduce MTV Exit and lead a discussion following the film.

Andrea Powell, Texas State graduate and Honors Program graduate (International Studies/Geography, 1999), is Co-Founder of FAIR Fund, an international organization that supports young women's civic engagement and activism to better their lives and communities. The majority of FAIR Fundís work centers on ending gender violence and engaging young women in politics. Andreaís work has taken her to Belarus, Bosnia, Serbia, Macedonia, Kosovo, Uzbekistan, Armenia, and the United States. She has presented her work at Tufts University, Suffolk Law School, Harvard Law School, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the University of Texas Public Policy Program, Yale University, Texas State University, and San Marcos High School. See http://www.fairfund.org for more information. -- Andrea will be in San Marcos the week of February 15-21 to receive the Walter Richter Humanitarian Award from Alumni Affairs on Saturday, February 17, 2007. On 15 February, 2007, at 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall, Andrea will introduce the short film MTV Exit and lead a discussion following the film. The film is associated with actress Angelina Jolie and deals with human trafficking. For more information, see http://217.69.40.171/english/protect/.

7:00pm, Centennial Hall Teaching Theatre

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February 15, 2007

Religion and Civil Rights in the African American Community
Roundtable Discussion with Bishop John J. McCarthy and Mr. Nelson Linder

The purpose of the Student Center's forum is to provide a venue for reasoned, civil, and meaningful engagement of contemporary issues, especially insofar as social, cultural, and intellectual issues relate to the university and its religious dimensions. The goal of the forum is less to arrive at a single correct answer and more to open new questions and lines of thought for all in attendance. This Roundtable Discussion will examine the history of protest and dissent as it has developed in American society, specifically as regards issues of civil rights and social justice for African American citizens. Invited speakers are Bishop John J. McCarthy and Mr. Nelson Linder (current President of Austin Chapter of the NAACP). For additional information, contact the event coordinator, Dr. Dan Lochman, at Lochman@txstate.edu or 245-9168.

7:00pm to 8:30pm; H. L. Grant Catholic Student Center - 100 Concho Street - 392-5925

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February 19, 2007

A Reception for Andrea Powell
Texas State and Honors Alumna Andrea Powell, Co-Founder of FAIR Fund, will be honored with a reception.

Andrea Powell, Texas State graduate and Honors Program graduate (International Studies/Geography, 1999), is Co-Founder of FAIR Fund, an international organization that supports young women's civic engagement and activism to better their lives and communities. The majority of FAIR Fundís work centers on ending gender violence and engaging young women in politics. Andreaís work has taken her to Belarus, Bosnia, Serbia, Macedonia, Kosovo, Uzbekistan, Armenia, and the United States. She has presented her work at Tufts University, Suffolk Law School, Harvard Law School, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the University of Texas Public Policy Program, Yale University, Texas State University, and San Marcos High School. See http://www.fairfund.org for more information. -- Andrea will be in San Marcos the week of February 15-21 to receive the Walter Richter Humanitarian Award from Alumni Affairs on Saturday, February 17, 2007. On 19 February, 2007, from 5p, to 7pm, the Mitte Honors Program will hold a reception to honor Andrea Powell.

5:00pm, Honors Forum (Lampasas 407, next to Old Main)

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February 19, 2007

Eyes on the Prize Series - Part VII & VIII
Film Series

Part VII: The Time Has Come (1964-1966). After a decade-long cry for justice, a new sound is heard in the civil rights movement: the insistent call for power. Malcolm X takes an eloquent nationalism to urban streets as a younger generation of black leaders listens. In the South, Stokely Carmichael and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) move from "Freedom Now!" to "Black Power!" as the fabric of the traditional movement changes. -- Part VIII: Two Societies (1965-1968). Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) come north to help Chicago's civil rights leaders in their nonviolent struggle against segregated housing. Their efforts pit them against Chicago's powerful mayor, Richard Daley. When a series of marches through all-white neighborhoods draws violence, King and Daley negotiate with mixed results. In Detroit, a police raid in a black neighborhood sparks an urban uprising that lasts five days, leaving 43 people dead. The Kerner Commission finds that America is becoming "two societies, one black, one white, separate and unequal." President Lyndon Johnson, who appointed the commission, ignores the report.

7:00pm, Alkek Teaching Theatre; free admission

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February 21, 2007

Zoot Suit (The Hollywood Film version)
This is the film stars Edward James Olmos, who was the featured speaker for the Fall 2006 Common Experience. Zoot Suit is a landmark Latino work from the pre-indie period, directed by Luis Valdez, who will be on the Texas State campus September 20th. Valdez's brother, Daniel Valdez, plays the hero but the big draw here is the sensational performance of Edward James Olmos. A brooding actor just beginning his screen career, Olmos plays a flamboyant, hectoring, all-seeing figure called El Pachuco.

8:30pm, Recital Hall - Music Building

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February 20 - March 27, 2007

Protest and Dissent Art Exhibition
Mary Mikel Stump, Curator

The exhibition will host a collective of 21 artists, from emerging to mid-career, and will be a survey of different media (printmaking, painting, photography, scuplture, fibers, metals). Most of the works are about issues regarding social ills: racism, immigration, justice, consumption, gay rights, animal processing, death penatly, Apharteid, politics, and war.

9am to 10pm daily; Art Gallery (Joann Cole Mitte Building); free admission

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February 26, 2007

Eyes on the Prize Series - Part IX & X
Film Series

Part IX: Power! (1966-1968). The call for Black Power takes various forms across communities in black America. In Cleveland, Carl Stokes wins election as the first black mayor of a major American city. The Black Panther Party, armed with law books, breakfast programs, and guns, is born in Oakland. Substandard teaching practices prompt parents to gain educational control of a Brooklyn school district but then lead them to a showdown with New York City's teachers' union. -- Part X: The Promised Land (1967-1968). Martin Luther King stakes out new ground for himself and the rapidly fragmenting civil rights movement. One year before his death, he publicly opposes the war in Vietnam. His Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) embarks on an ambitious Poor People's Campaign. In the midst of political organizing, King detours to support striking sanitation workers in Memphis, where he is assassinated. King's death and the failure of his final campaign mark the end of a major stream of the movement.

7:00pm, Alkek Teaching Theatre; free admission

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March 3, 2007

Composition: Utopian Traces in Dissent
Mark Sullivan, Michigan State University

Mark Sullivan is one of the most refreshing and well-known American contemporary composers.

4pm, Recital Hall (Music Building); free admission

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March 5, 2007

Eyes on the Prize Series - Part XI & XII
Film Series

Part XI: Ain't Gonna Shuffle No More (1964-1972). A call to pride and a renewed push for unity galvanize black America. World heavyweight champion Cassius Clay challenges America to accept him as Muhammad Ali, a minister of Islam who refuses to fight in Vietnam. Students at Howard University in Washington, D.C., fight to bring the growing black consciousness movement and their African heritage inside the walls of this prominent black institution. Black elected officials and community activists organize the National Black Political Convention in Gary, Indiana, in an attempt to create a unified black response to growing repression against the movement. -- Part XII: A Nation of Law? (1968-1971). Black activism is increasingly met with a sometimes violent and unethical response from local and federal law enforcement agencies. In Chicago, two Black Panther Party leaders are killed in a pre-dawn raid by police acting on information supplied by an FBI informant. In the wake of President Nixon's call to "law and order," stepped-up arrests push the already poor conditions at New York's Attica State Prison to the limit. A five-day inmate takeover calling the public's attention to the conditions leaves 43 men dead: four killed by inmates, 39 by police.

7:00pm, Alkek Teaching Theatre; free admission

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March 8, 2007

Protest and Dissent: Juilliard Joins Texas State for a Common Experience in the Arts
Performing artists from the Juilliard School directed by Wayne Oquin, with the Texas State Symphony under the Direction of Howard Hudiburg. With compositions by Tony Kushner, Oliver Messiaen, Wayne Oquin, Charles Wuorinen, and Iannis Xenakis.

8pm, Evans Auditorium; free admission

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March 19, 2007

Eyes on the Prize Series - Part XIII & XIV
Film Series

Part XIII: The Keys to the Kingdom (1974-1980). In the 1970s, antidiscrimination legal rights gained in past decades by the civil rights movement are put to the test. In Boston, some whites violently resist a federal court school desegregation order. Atlanta's first black mayor, Maynard Jackson, proves that affirmative action can work, but the Bakke Supreme Court case challenges that policy. -- Part XIV: Back to the Movement (1979-mid 1980s). Power and powerlessness. Miami's black community -- pummeled by urban renewal, a lack of jobs, and police harassment -- explodes in rioting. But in Chicago, an unprecedented grassroots movement triumphs. Frustrated by decades of unfulfilled promises made by the city's Democratic political machine, reformers install Harold Washington as Chicago's first black mayor.

7:00pm, Alkek Teaching Theatre; free admission

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March 20, 2007

Fight in the Fields
SACA Film Series

More than two years in the making, The Fight in the Fields: Cesar Chávez and the Farmworkers' Struggle is the first film to cover the full arc of Cesar Chávez' life. The Fight in the Fields follows the first successful organizing drive of farm workers in the United States, while recounting the many failed and dramatic attempts to unionize that led up to this victory.

7:00pm, Centennial Hall

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March 21, 2007

Catch A Fire
SACA Film Series

Based on a true story, "Catch a Fire" is a tense political thriller set in South Africa from the makers of "The Interpreter" and award-winning director Phillip Noyce (The Quiet American, Rabbit-Proof Fence). Patrick Chamusso (played by Derek Luke) has a nice life, a loving family and an good job. But when he is wrongly accused of a crime he didn't commit, his life and that of his family are put in danger. His self-respect, deep love for family and survival instinct force him to put everything on the line to fight back. But opposing him is chief investigating officer Nic Vos (Academy Award winner Tim Robbins), who will do anything to stop Chamusso, who now has become his most dangerous enemy.

7:00pm, LBJ Amphitheatre

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March 21, 2007

Zoot Suit (The Hollywood Film version)
This is the film stars Edward James Olmos, who was the featured speaker for the Fall 2006 Common Experience. Zoot Suit is a landmark Latino work from the pre-indie period, directed by Luis Valdez, who will be on the Texas State campus September 20th. Valdez's brother, Daniel Valdez, plays the hero but the big draw here is the sensational performance of Edward James Olmos. A brooding actor just beginning his screen career, Olmos plays a flamboyant, hectoring, all-seeing figure called El Pachuco.

7:30pm, Recital Hall - Music Building

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March 27, 2007

Protest and Dissent Art Exhibition - Roundtable Discussion
Mary Mikel Stump, Curator

At this last day of the Protest & Dissent Exhibition, several artists, critics, curators, and educators will participate in a Roundtable discussion. The exhibition itself is a collective of 21 artists, from emerging to mid-career, and is a survey of different media (printmaking, painting, photography, scuplture, fibers, metals). Most of the works are about issues regarding social ills: racism, immigration, justice, consumption, gay rights, animal processing, death penatly, Apharteid, politics, and war.

11:00am, Joann Cole Mitte Building, Room 2121

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April 9, 2007

United 93
SACA Film Series

A drama that tells the story of the passengers and crew, their families on the ground and the flight controllers who watched in dawning horror as United Airlines Flight 93 became the fourth hijacked plane on the day of the worst terrorist attacks on American soil: September 11, 2001. 'United 93' recreates the doomed trip in actual time, from takeoff to hijacking to the realization by those onboard.

7:00pm, LBJ TT

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April 11, 2007

Isabel Allende
Chilean author will speak about "Protest & Dissent".

For more information on Ms. Allende's work, click HERE.

7:00pm, LBJ Student Center Mall

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April 16, 2007

Earth Day: "Silent Spring, Insecticides, and the Origins of Earth Day"
a Lecture by James McWilliams

James McWilliams is an assistant professor of history at Texas State University, who has written two books, A Revolution in Eating: How the Quest for Food Shaped America and Building the Bay Colony: Local Economy and Culture in Early Massachusetts. His next book, tentatively titled The Bug Wars: Four Hundred Years of Insect Control in America will be released in 2008. Dr. McWilliams will be a visiting fellow at Yale University during the 2007-2008 academic year.

1:00pm, Evans Liberal Arts, Room 116